10 Quotes to Inspire Your Recovery in 2016

Happy New Year Pace Recovery Here are 10 quotes to help inspire your recovery in 2016. The men of Pace Recovery wish you a happy and successful New Year.
  1. “We have it in our power to begin the world over again.” –Thomas Paine
  2. “There will come a time when you believe everything is finished. That will be the beginning.” -Louis L'Amour
  3. “Every accomplishment starts with the decision to try.” –Unknown
  4. “Go the extra mile, it’s never crowded.” –Unknown
  5. “If I quit now I will soon be back to where I started, and when I started I was desperately wishing to be where I am now.” –Unknown
  6. “Success is not owned. It’s leased, and rent is due every day.” –JJ Watt
  7. “Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage.” –Anais Nin
  8. “The most important thing is this; to be able to be able at any moment to sacrifice what you are, for what you will become.” –Eric Thomas
  9. “The best way out is always through.” –Robert Frost
  10. An old Cherokee told his grandson, “My son there is a battle between two wolves inside us all. One is evil. It is anger, jealousy, greed, resentment, inferiority, lies, and ego. The other is good. It is joy, peace, love, hope, humanity, kindness, empathy, and truth.”
The boy thought about it and asked, “Grandfather, which wolf wins?” The old man replied “The one you feed.”  

Staying Sober This Christmas

christmasOn the eve of Christmas those in recovery need to prepare themselves for what may be a tumultuous day. It is fair to say that holidays are extremely difficult for people working a program. While everyone wants to be around their family and take part in the celebration, spending time with family can be stressful - especially if alcohol is part of the equation. A significant amount of alcohol is typically consumed during the major holidays and for people in recovery, especially those who are new; it can be difficult to be around. However, if you implement the tools that working a program has given you, it is possible to get through the day with a smile on your face and not pick up a drink. Avoiding high risk situations that could put your recovery at risk is ever important, even if your family falls into that category. Naturally, just because you have stopped drinking and are creating a new life for yourself, does not mean that others will understand or be conscientious of what you are doing and they may convince you that you can have a drink without consequences. If you are in recovery, you know that if you drink you could lose everything wonderful that the program has given you - which is why you don’t drink no matter what. Even if you are new to recovery, you are probably aware of what you can and cannot be around. Dangerous people, places and things could jeopardize your recovery. It is likely that you have been invited to some parties being held between now and the New Year, if you must attend it is always wise to bring a recovery peer with you. If that option is not available, it is wise to limit the amount of time that you are at a holiday party. The longer you are around alcohol, the greater the likelihood of experiencing cravings. It always sound to leave parties early. 12-step meetings will be held all day long tomorrow; attending at least one is advised. Being around your family may bring up some emotions that are painful. If you go to a meeting, you can discuss how your feeling with your recovery peers; there is a good chance that others are experiencing the same thing. Talking about how your feeling is the best way to work through the problem and move forward; letting emotions fester is a sure path to a bottle. Always remember that you are not alone, there is entire network of people all working towards the same end. If you are struggling, reach out. We at Pace Recovery Center would like to wish everyone a Merry Christmas. We hope that you have a safe and sober holiday.

Young People In Recovery – The Sky’s The Limit

recovery, young peopleYoung people, who find that they have a problem with drugs and/or alcohol, often discover themselves in a position that can be hard to believe or accept. They know that help is required, but they say to themselves, “I’m a young person, how can I live the rest of my life free from all mind altering substances?” When a person forms a relationship with a chemical substance, like any serious relationship that is unhealthy, it is extremely painful to break that tie, even though their future depends upon it. Recovery, if it happens, occurs at different times in people’s lives. Some people do not address the problem until they are middle aged, while others’ addiction progresses so quickly that intervention is necessary much earlier. Young adults in need of addiction treatment often find it unfair that they cannot use drugs and alcohol in the same way that “normal” people do; that is mind altering substances are all consuming for them. What’s more, it can be difficult for them to believe that anything is possible as long as they refrain from using drugs and alcohol - that the sky's the limit. It is often said in programs of recovery, “Don’t leave before the miracle happens;” unfortunately, the reality is that many young people will relapse before that are able to enjoy the gifts of addiction recovery, and it can take years for some to turn to recovery again. Thankfully, that is not always the case, young people can recover, maintain their sobriety for years and years to come, and achieve what they would of once thought was impossible. Michael Botticelli, is a perfect example of a person who battled with the demons of addiction as a young adult, found recovery, and went on to achieve great things. For those who may not be aware, Botticelli went from alcoholic to the President’s “drug czar,” the Director of National Drug Control Policy. Yes, that’s right; the person in charge of how we, as a nation, address addiction is himself in recovery. Botticelli has been alcohol free for 27 years, after a driving under the influence arrest. The judge gave him the option of treatment or jail - he chose the former. Now, he manages a $26 billion budget across 16 government agencies, CBS News reports. Botticelli believes that we need to bring addiction out of the shadows, breaking the stigma and changing the language.
Director Michael Botticelli
Director Botticelli
Please take a moment to watch an interview with Director Botticelli on 60 Minutes. His personal story is remarkable. PACE Recovery Center is an exclusive, gender-specific, extended care, alcohol and drug rehab for men struggling with chemical dependency and behavioral health issues. Please contact PACE if you or a loved one would like to like to learn about our inpatient or outpatient programs. The miracle of recovery is real.

Trading One Addiction for Another

addictionIt is a common occurrence for alcoholics who sober up from alcohol to think that they can still use drugs. Conversely, many addicts who stop using drugs believe that they can still consume alcohol. Such misconceptions have led to countless relapses among people working programs of recovery. It is safe to say that if someone has developed an addiction to one substance or action, the potential for becoming addicted to another is exponentially increased, and the likelihood that a person will return to the addiction of choice is great. People with a propensity for developing harmful relationships with things that give them pleasure should be wary of all mind altering substance/actions. Many addicts and alcoholics, upon sobering up, often have cravings for a release which can lead to harmful behaviors riding a wave of impulse. While a large percentage of alcoholics/addicts in early recovery know they cannot and should not swap booze for drugs and vice versa, many will turn to sugary foods and drink, promiscuous sexual activity, et al. Such behaviors can lead to new habits that can morph into an addiction, and potentially lead to an eventual relapse to their substance of choice. It is vital that people who are new to recovery be extra vigilant when it comes to the activities they find themselves craving. In addition to walking you through the “steps,” sponsors are excellent sounding boards for determining if what you're doing, or thinking of doing, is conducive to a sound program of recovery. There are reasons why many alcoholics crave sugar upon sobering up; alcohol is loaded with sugar and carbohydrates. Nine times out of ten if you attend a 12-step meeting you will likely see cookies and coffee (with plenty of sugar to accompany the drink) on the center table, you will see a number of people with an energy drink in their hand. While the use of alcohol actually lowers one’s blood sugar level, the drink is chock-full of sugar; when many people stop drinking, after years of continued use, they can be faced with an insatiable craving from sugar. Alcoholics and addicts carry the D2 dopamine receptor, the gene that identifies addiction; sugar addicts share the same gene. If sugar cravings are not kept in check, it can lead to overeating, which is accompanied by its own list side effects. Sugar is one example; there are many other addictions that can fill in for one’s substance of choice. It is for that reason that recovering addicts need to be especially conscientious of their behaviors and if you are noticing unhealthy trends developing, it is crucial that you speak with your sponsor or therapist. Recovery is about progress, not switching one harmful behavior for another. At PACE Recovery Center our treatment team works with our clients to examine cultural, social and personal relapse triggers and develop a relapse prevention plan with acquired and practiced skills. Relapse analysis and relapse prevention are extremely effective with clients who have substance addictions, compulsive behaviors, and mental health disorders. That is why relapse prevention is an essential component of our men’s addiction treatment program.

Spirituality: The Search for A Higher Power

higher-powerDrugs and alcohol are powerful substances that can strip people of their identity, taking one to places that they swore they would never go. Paradoxically, a person in the grips of addiction often feels that they are in control of their life, when in fact the reality is quite different. The illusion of control that addicts and alcoholics maintain is often a top reason for not seeking help sooner, a misconception that can prove fatal. Coming to terms with the fact that you have become a slave to drink or drugs, and that there is a power greater than oneself, is a pivotal component in finding recovery. Reconnecting, or establishing for the first time a relationship, with a higher power can be a hard pill to swallow for many people new to recovery. Wrapping your head around having a “god” in your life can be difficult, after struggling with addiction for years it is easy to convince yourself that god has turned his/her back on you. Failure to create a relationship with a higher power will hinder a successful recovery.

Let Go, and Let…

Spirituality is the glue that holds one’s recovery together. Without a connection to a power greater than oneself, everything will fall apart. There is a reason why twelve-step programs put so much emphasis on creating and maintaining a relationship with a higher power of some kind. In order to work the steps, one has to let go of their illusions of control and put their faith and trust in something outside themselves. Surrendering to a higher power can prove difficult, people struggle to let go and accept that no one is in control of life’s outcome, especially after many years of living on self will alone. However, when someone comes to terms with the fact that their mindset of being in control was a major component of their addiction - letting go becomes a little bit easier, and one finds that their mind and spirit has been freed. Being relieved of the burden of control allows one to channel their energies in other directions, a necessity when working a program of recovery. Living a spiritual life will help you develop a relationship with recovery, the recovery community, and your higher power. Having the feeling that you are connected to something greater than yourself, helps you live one day at time free from drugs and alcohol.

Finding A Connection

Many who have begun a journey of recovery using the twelve step modality, have some kind of history with religion (for good or bad); this can be a shortcut to reestablishing belief, as there is a foundation in place to build on. On the other hand, there are number of people who have no history with spirituality or belief in a god. If you fall into that realm, do not be discouraged, for you are not alone. Hopefully you have begun working with or seeking a sponsor, a person who will prove pivotal to your recovery. A sponsor can help guide you in your search for a power greater than yourself, and they will inform you that a higher power does not have be a religious deity. A higher power can, in effect, be anything from the universe right down to the recovery group that you attend. One’s higher power is purely subjective, and there is an infinite multitude of things one can put their faith into and receive guidance from. Establishing a connection will not necessarily happen overnight, everyone’s experience is different; what’s important is that one stays active in fostering a relationship with something greater than themselves

There are a few things that you can do that may help you with your search:

Meditation/Prayer: Taking sometime throughout the day to sit quietly, free from the distractions of day to day life, allows you to open your mind to the spiritual world: An act that can put you in a position to practice having a dialogue with something greater. Even if you feel like no one is listening, do not be discouraged, it is important to practice communicating and seeking guidance from outside of yourself. More times, than not, you will feel better after having taking the time to do such a simple task. Being of Service: If you are attending meetings, volunteering your help is great way to get outside of yourself. Selfless acts have a reciprocal effect. Helping others, helps you live in the sunshine of the spirit. When you help others it makes you feel good, you forget about the multitude of things that have been weighing you down. Being connected to others is a great way to practice connecting to a higher power. Don’t Give Up: You often hear the saying “progress, not perfection.” Recovery is a process that can take time to fully grasp. It is important that you listen to your peers with an open mind; they can prove instrumental in your having made a connection with an outside power. Establishing a spiritual relationship will happen in its own time, trust in the program and your desire to live differently than you have in the past. At PACE Recovery Center our motto is a Positive Attitude Changes Everything and our program offers our clients the ability to reintegrate back into a life that emphasizes the true transformation out of one’s addicted identity and into a life of recovery through integrative education, insight and relapse prevention.

Contact Us