Recovery Demands Your Honesty

recovery

Honesty is a real lifesaver for people in addiction recovery; truthfulness, with yourself and others, is key to long-term sobriety. Most people working a program would probably agree that it’s not always easy telling the truth. After years of duplicitous behavior, many find it trying to let others know what is bouncing around their mind. For some, dishonesty is ostensibly second nature, and turning it off takes practice.

In most cases, a failure in forthrightness is venial, or forgivable. Case in point: Did you call your sponsor today? Answering yes (when the opposite is true), isn’t necessarily going to result in returning to drug or alcohol use. However, making a practice of telling even white lies, can come back to haunt a person. Being mendacious – in certain circumstances – may not be inherently harmful; but, even half-truths and omissions can set a dangerous precedent. Men and women in recovery who present delusive impressions to their peers, subvert progress!

People incapable of being honest with their peers or sponsor about doing the Work are likely going to be the same individuals who keep a relapse to him or herself. It's exceedingly common; a relapse occurs, and a series of charades follows closely behind—indefinitely. Fear of social consequences drives some to continue attending meetings and sharing; they feel unable to divulge the fact their program has eroded. Such instances are the epitome of the disease of addiction at work; too sick to pull back the curtain, too prideful to ask for help.

Reasons for Being Dishonest (In an Honest Program)

A couple of idioms that hold water in recovery: honesty is the best policy and pride comes before the fall. Each person in the program, whether he or she has a week or ten years sober, wants to succeed. Everyone would like to be free from the bondage of self, a veritable ball-and-chain keeping one from fulfilling his or her real potential. Even though telling the truth is more straightforward than dishonesty, human beings tend to convince themselves that the opposite is factual. Unfortunately, for addicts and alcoholics, the above mindset carries with it a substantial and pernicious cost.

Myriad kinds of deceit exist and why one feels the compulsion to be deceitful is subjective. However, in the rooms of recovery, lying is often the byproduct of desiring to meet other people's expectations. Or, better still, what one believes is expected of a person in recovery. Both men and women have a way of gauging their successes in life on other’s perceptions. This reality can create an echo chamber of sorts or opposing mirror effect. Justifying a deception now and again becomes more comfortable to stomach, as such. If one’s peers think they are doing well, it’s possible to internalize and convince oneself that everything is OK.

In early recovery, there is an internal power struggle for control between the disease and the spirit. An apt characterization of addiction is ‘self-will run riot,’ the misconception that one holds dominion over their existence. Sometimes people lie because honesty can feel like ceding control. Many individuals think that they alone must influence the narrative of life. Moreover, such people are willing to go to great lengths to achieve that goal. Persons deluding themselves and others in recovery may find that truth is inconvenient!

Cascading Lies Lead to Relapse

Dishonesty is defendable, at times, when hoping to avoid offending others. Duplicity is, after all, a human behavior; it is likely that nobody is honest all the time. We all know that established social, and behavioral norms almost demand one lie on occasion. Still, all who contend with mental illness needs be wary of being misleading or lying by omission.

Those who omit specific details with their support network tend to experience enormous guilt and shame. Motivations for lying aside, individuals who keep unhealthy thoughts or feelings from their peers become mired in stress. Each person in recovery has shortcomings they must contend with; and, the program provides recourse for addressing imperfections. Downplaying weaknesses for fear of judgment or social persecution is counterproductive. Minimizing deficiencies to your peers will destabilize the mission to heal and erodes any advancements.

In recovery, as in life, men can and do struggle with sharing emotions and vulnerabilities. An inability to open oneself up entirely to their support group has unintended consequences. Guarded individuals are more vulnerable to relapse. Those unable to practice honesty in every affair will find being accountable to and responsible for a program an impossibility. Each of us learns at a young age that lies beget lies, untruths snowball quickly and become hard to contain.

If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything.” —Mark Twain

A single drop of dishonesty can honestly morph into a torrential downpour of negative emotions. People who can't find the strength to come clean, with haste, put more than their recovery at risk.

Addiction Recovery

Please reach out to PACE Recovery Center to take the first step toward recovery and leading a life of authenticity. We offer a safe place, for men in the grips of alcohol or substance use disorder, to delve into the underlying issues of their illness. We can provide tools and teach you skills to live honest, happy, joyous, and free.

Addiction Recovery: Reaching New Heights

addiction recovery

Addiction recovery is many things and working a program asks a certain height of individuals. Those who commit themselves to a program learn that if they can adhere to certain principles, there is no limit. Naturally, such discoveries are welcome news to individuals who – in some case, have been in the grips of despair for years and even decades.

Believe it or not, the fact is, that some in recovery have gone on to lead extraordinary existences. Men and women who are willing, to be honest, find him or herself able to accomplish what was once unthinkable. There are others who, after losing touch with their aspirations of yesteryear, now have the tools to see their dreams come to fruition.

There exist plenty of clichés to describe what is achievable through a daily commitment to sobriety. Perhaps, too many to list. People new to the program may be apt to disregard what “old timers” claim they will achieve if they stay the course, at first. However, with each milestone in the program, the very same individuals learn that what they heard early on is correct. Addiction recovery carries with it endless possibilities. Inside all of us is a near infinite limit of potential!

Addiction Recovery Inspires

Any human, regardless of their background, can be touched by a debilitating illness of the mind. While the disease of addiction skips over most people, affliction is the unfortunate reality of hundreds of millions of people around the globe. Just as anyone can feel the impact mental illness, each of us can recover, provided however we work together.

Using one of several codices of addiction recovery, guided by those who came before, men women can dream of something better. They learn if they do the work, emphasize honesty, and never give up no matter how difficult life is at times the doors of opportunity will open. The dream of addiction recovery realized, begets new aspirations. The fire of ambition stifled by past drug and alcohol use is reignited by committing oneself to live life on life’s terms.

At PACE Recovery Center, we see the blessings of sobriety take young men out of the abyss of Self and enable them to fulfill their potential. Embracing recovery, our clients see both old and new goals realized; they excel in school, reconnect with their families, land dream jobs, and help others accomplish the same. Each person in recovery receives the gift of being a beacon of hope for countless others still “out there” or new to abstinence.

The Realization of Near Infinite Potential

Men and women who are preparing to embark upon a journey of recovery often require a nudge to take the next step. Those already doing the work are at risk of becoming impatient; some will stray as a result. There are individuals too – with years of sobriety – who find their existence stagnate and their drive for progress in a state of dormancy. Recovery, after all, is rarely a flat line; the flames of ambition can dim even when one is doing all the work.

A new documentary aims to not only inspire people to take the journey of addiction recovery for the first time, but, what’s more, the filmmakers seek to galvanize those with significant lengths of continuous sobriety, as well. ‘Six Gifts’ follows surfer Ben Gravy, snowboarder Scott French, skier Rebecca Selig, endurance athlete Chris Vargo, yogi Monica Lebansky, and cross-fitter Melody Schofield. Sober and Stoked produced the movie.

The movie is meant to inspire people currently suffering from addiction and those who are unable to find that missing piece to the puzzle to help finally get them sober. It's also for people who are already sober and feel like they need something else to get them motivated and out enjoying life, so they don’t fall back into previous traps and pitfalls.”

Sober and Stoked co-founders, Scott French and Eugene Stiltner, plan to use the proceeds, according to the website, from the movie for launching the "Sober and Stoked" non-profit:

to help equip halfway houses throughout the country with athletic gear, art supplies, instruments, and more, so that those new to recovery can have a chance to rediscover a lost passion, or finally discover their purpose!”

Please take a moment to watch the ‘6 Gifts’ trailer:


If you are having trouble watching, please click here.

Addiction Recovery Can Be Yours, Too

Please reach out to our gender-specific, men’s addiction treatment, if you are ready to make changes in your life. PACE Recovery Center can teach you how to lead a life free from drugs and alcohol, and go on to realize your goals. It would be our great pleasure to be part of your incredible journey into recovery.

PTSD and Addiction Treatment for Veterans

PTSD

Veterans Day 2018 in the United States of America is Sunday, November 11; but, the country will officially observe the holiday on Monday. Each year, the Gentlemen of PACE Recovery Center like to express our gratitude for those who serve bravely in the military. As a treatment center specializing in bringing the light of addiction recovery into the lives of young men, the coming holiday is acutely important. We understand that many people who come back from armed conflict overseas struggle in civilian life. The prevalence of mental illness among such people is high, conditions that include anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress or PTSD, and substance use disorder.

The rates of substance abuse or use disorders for male veterans aged 18–25 years are higher compared to civilians, according to a recent study. Substance use disorders can precipitate the development of coöccurring mental illness or can emerge secondary to conditions like depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is common among individuals who witness or experience trauma; without evidence-based treatment, men and women are more likely to self-medicate.

The order in which a psychological disorder presents itself pales in importance compared to the need for therapy. Veterans who are unable to access the care they need are likely to continue misusing drugs and alcohol. Continued substance abuse does little to ameliorate PTSD symptoms, leads to or worsens a substance use disorder, and significantly increases one’s risk of self-harm. Veterans who commit suicide have drugs and alcohol in the system regularly.

Young males, struggling with substance use and coöccurring mental illness like PTSD, are encouraged to seek help. Immediately! The more extended treatment is put off, the more deleterious it is to the individual.

PTSD Treatment That’s Right For You

A new study appearing in the American Journal of Psychiatry shows that PTSD patients, including veterans and survivors of sexual assault, who have a say in the form of treatment they receive, fare better. The researchers found that patient preference in the course of treatment impacts the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy and use of antidepressants, according to a University of Washington press release. The study was the first large-scale trial of hundreds of PTSD patients.

This research suggests that prolonged exposure and Sertraline are both good, evidence-based options for PTSD treatment -- and that providing information to make an informed choice enhances long-term outcomes," said study lead author, Lori Zoellner, a UW professor of psychology and director of the Center for Anxiety & Traumatic Stress.

Analysis indicates that SSRI antidepressants and prolonged exposure therapy show promise in mitigating the symptoms of PTSD. However, the group of patients who were offered a choice in the type of treatment they receive exhibited:

  • Fewer symptoms;
  • a greater ability to follow their treatment plan;
  • and, some no longer met the criteria for PTSD two-years later.

Almost 75 percent of patients who underwent their preferred method of treatment, completed the program, according to the article. Whereas, fewer than half in the non-preferred group saw their therapy through to the end.

Dr. Zoellner and our team showed that we've got two effective, very different interventions for chronic PTSD and associated difficulties," said study co-author Norah Feeny, a psychology professor at Case Western Reserve University. "Given this, and the fact that getting a treatment you prefer confers significant benefit, we are now able to move toward better personalized treatment for those suffering after trauma. These findings have significant public health impact and should inform practice."

Addiction and Dual Diagnosis Treatment

Approximately 50 percent of veterans who need treatment for mental health conditions seek it, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration. However, just more than half who receive treatment receive adequate care. Mental health conditions among veterans are no small issue; approximately 18.5% of service members returning from Iraq or Afghanistan have PTSD or depression. According to the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, more than 2 of 10 Veterans with PTSD also have substance use disorder.

Studies, like the UW/Case Western, are vital and should help guide screening, diagnosis, and the determination of a treatment plan. It’s also worth mentioning that a large number of veterans are unable to access evidence-based treatment where they live. Such individuals can benefit from seeking help in another area. If you are a male veteran who is struggling with substance use disorder or coöccuring mental illness (dual diagnosis), please contact PACE Recovery Center.

Veterans Day 2018, we would like to honor two of our staff members who served in the U.S. Marine Corp, our Chief Operations Officer Sean Kelly and our Lead Resident Manager Victor Calzada. Additionally, our PACE team members Helen O’Mahony, Ph.D., Hisham Korraa, M.D., and Ryan Wright, M.D. all have extensive experience working with veterans with PTSD and substance abuse issues.

Again, the gender-specific environment at PACE enables men to share openly and without fear of judgment or social pressure. Our team works together with referring physicians and healthcare providers to create individualized dual-diagnosis treatment plans that emphasize continuity of care. Please call 800-526-1851 or submit a confidential online inquiry, to learn more about our innovative program for men.

Addiction to Recovery: A Young Man’s Journey

addiction

Who better to inspire young men in the grips of addiction to take a leap of faith and embark on a quest of recovery then a young man. Addicts and alcoholics – seemingly by nature – feel disconnected from the world around them; such individuals convince themselves that no one else can understand their struggle. As a result, men and women battling the disease consider the desolate course they are on as being the only option. Even when friends and family encourage a loved one to seek help, their pleas can fall on deaf ears.

The sad and unfortunate reality is that too many people believe recovery is impossible. Alternatively, if it is attainable, thoughts of not having what it takes abound; they become convinced that their disease is too advanced or worse, they do not deserve freedom from the scourge of addiction. Driven by countless forms of guilt, shame, and regret, some will spurn recovery services and continue on a path typified by self-defeating and destructive behaviors.

In many ways, it is more onerous to encourage young men and women to seek treatment. College-aged persons have a difficult time believing that they meet the criteria for addiction, even in the face of life spinning more and more out of control. It is easy to persuade one’s self that you are too young to have drunk and drugged yourself to the point of developing a progressive, incurable disease. Young folk who’ve seen movies with recovery themes, picture older people sitting in circles identifying as addicts and alcoholics; when applying the images they have in their head to their reality, it can be grueling to relate.

Never Again?

There are some young people, meeting the criteria for a use disorder, who have a hard time reconciling with the fact that recovery means total abstinence. Explaining to someone in their twenties that a fulfilling and productive life depends on never drinking or drugging again (among other things), is news that some struggle to welcome. The disease, while inanimate, is always pushing people away from making decisions that are in one’s best interest. Even those looking up at the bottom of despair will put limits on the sacrifices they are willing to make to lead a healthy life.

Not everyone who needs addiction treatment is willing to admit it to him or herself. Perhaps the most significant paradox of addiction that people who appear to have lost everything think that they can stand to lose more before they surrender. The lengths a person will go to continue down a path toward almost certain death is astonishing. Even in the 21st Century, in a country devastated by an overdose death toll, addicts and alcoholics persuade themselves into thinking that it can’t happen to them; such people consider themselves somehow different.

Being unwilling to commit to a life of total abstinence or being too young, are just two of many reasons given by individuals to avoid seeking help; there are myriad excuses one can put forth to skirt making the courageous decision to seek help. If you are a young person who thinks himself too young-in-age, we implore you to think again. Please understand that thousands and thousands of young men are currently working programs of lasting recovery; they are both inspired and given direction by the young men who came before.

A Young Man In Addiction Recovery

Millions of Americans, many of whom are young men, are battling addiction and coöccurring mental illness. There exist treatment centers, fellowships, and support groups which guide these young men out of the abyss of self and into the selfless light of recovery. There are men in their late twenties with more than ten years clean and sober.

One young man in long-term recovery is an author, Nic Sheff. If you follow and read this blog regularly, then you are probably aware that Nic’s story is the subject of a new film in theaters now, “Beautiful Boy.” We covered some of the details of the film last month and are pleased that it is well received by both moviegoers and Nic and David Sheff. Recently, Nic sat down with actor Timothée Chalamet for a Q&A; Chalamet plays Nic in the movie. Please take a moment to watch and listen to Nic as he shares about his inspiring experience. If you are a young man dealing with active addiction, perhaps you will derive hope from the young man's experience with the disease and recovery. Nic rightly points out, “As long as there is life there is always hope.”


If you are having trouble watching, please click here.
With addiction, when you get sober, it’s not like your life just goes back to the way that it was before. Your life gets so much better than it ever had been,” says Nic during the Q&A. “It’s a really amazing life that’s possible sober. The fact that addiction is not a death sentence, and that the love that a family has is always there even after everything that we all went through, to have that love, in the end, is beautiful.

If you are new to recovery, Nic advises that you ‘take things slow and just hold on,’ things will not always be this way.

Young Adult Rehab Program

At PACE Recovery Center, the goal of our gender-specific, young adult rehab program is to equip our clients with the tools and skills to live healthy, happy, and balanced lives free from substances. If you or a male loved one needs assistance for a substance use disorder and/or coöccurring mental illness, please contact us today.

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