Addiction Recovery Resolutions You Can Keep

addiction recovery

One of the first things people working a program of addiction recovery recognizes is that nobody is perfect. Believe it or not, striving for perfection is one of the markers of many individual's diseases. Each of us – in recovery or not – are works-in-progress. As long as we are working towards continual growth, then we are on the right track.

Men and women in early recovery have much to consider on a daily basis. Each day, one sets him or herself to task by always putting sobriety first. We manage such a goal by prioritizing selflessness, responsibility, and accountability to your program and support network. If you endeavor to be an active participant in your recovery, and that of others, it is harder to entertain detrimental thoughts. When a person stresses the importance of being useful to their peers, others will reciprocate. The road to lasting recovery is paved together.

In the twelfth hour of 2018, some of you are probably thinking about the previous 300 plus days. You may be contemplating how far you have come since deciding to break the cycle of addiction. Maybe you are thinking about the ways your life has changed in a relatively short period? Transformation can happen, at times, without us even realizing; the rigmarole of routine can blind us to advancements. Still, reviewing the past year with an eye for improvements is an excellent practice. Moreover, now is also an ideal opportunity to consider areas in your life that still require fine-tuning. Again, there is no pinnacle in recovery; we are always growing in addiction recovery.

Another Day In Addiction Recovery

Another valuable bit of wisdom individuals glean in early sobriety is to stay present. Progress happens at its own pace for each; so, spending too much time thinking about what's next can be hazardous. That's not to say you can't set goals for yourself; you can, it's just that one must do so with caution. One's ambitions are more likely to come to fruition if they are reasonable. Setting unrealistic targets can result in an upset; and, upset can beget guilt and shame. The latter two emotions are a recipe for relapse.

With the New Year drawing nearer, people in addiction recovery can benefit from planning out the next two weeks or so. Hanukkah is behind some people, but Christmas is on the horizon for many more. Of course, December 31 is a day of note for everyone.

With celebratory days in mind, creating a schedule for the coming weeks is perhaps more vital than ever for people working a program. Those who are brand new to recovery can benefit from staying especially close to their peers at this time. Heed the advice of your support group, and you will find yourself in 2019 with sobriety intact. When Christmas and New Year's Eve knock at the door, ever remind yourself that each is just another day in recovery.

Taking power out of something like a holiday will alleviate some of the stress that accompanies extraordinary times of the year. The less turmoil you have to manage, the more time you can spend meeting your objectives. Lastly, let's consider making resolutions for the year to come and healthy methods of setting targets for oneself.

Reasonable Resolutions for Addiction Recovery

If you find yourself with some downtime shortly, grab pen and paper and jot down some thoughts. Think long and honestly about your current strengths and that which might be holding you back. As mentioned above, it's critical to avoid unrealistic targets. For instance, someone racked with a colossal amount of debt is probably not going to get out of arrears entirely in 2019. Setting one's sights too high will almost certainly precipitate disappointment. Instead, prioritizing saving money each month in 2019 to put towards one's deficit is a more reasonable objective.

Set flexible and adjustable resolutions for yourself and avoid either-or scenarios. Remember that few things are black or white and don't etch the achievements you hope to make in stone. Targets for advancements should be malleable; life changes invariably, so will your aspirations.

Missions that people in early recovery can complete can include eating healthier or exercising a few days a week. Giving up tobacco, perhaps? Another realistic target is chiseling out time for volunteering your services to the recovery community once a week. Maybe you'd like to explore other meetings outside your standard circuit; you can resolve to attend one new group a week, for example. Having the goal of introducing yourself to newcomers more often is one that is manageable. Set resolutions that are not monumental in size and scope.

Always remember that resolutions are more attainable when you make adaptations for yourself, not someone else. It's nice to want to make others happy, but you must be wary of your motives. People often find that when they make personal improvements, it has the effect of making others joyful. Throughout the coming year take time to acknowledge the small victories and milestones, doing so will incentivize continued effort in addiction recovery.

Southern California Addiction Treatment

We invite men, in the grips of alcohol or substance use disorder, to contact us to learn more about PACE Recovery Center. We address all components of addiction and mental health; our multi-dimensional approach to recovery helps males lead a life that is happy, joyous and free.

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