Addiction Recovery: A Year In Review

addiction recovery

As the year inches closer to a conclusion, most Americans are looking forward to 2021. This year has been extraordinarily challenging, and life as we know it has changed drastically. We have all had to make enormous sacrifices in order to safeguard our health and safety. Those of you in addiction recovery have also had to change how you work a program.

2020 has been a year that technology has been indispensable; without video conferencing platforms, it would have been nearly impossible for most people to keep their recovery intact. Addiction recovery programs rely on working closely with others to make progress. If you are unable to connect with others, it isn’t easy to stay accountable. Smartphones and computers have become outlets of accountability.

There is no way of knowing when life will resume some semblance of normality. Thankfully, the fellowship rose to the occasion; countless men and women across the country organized thousands of virtual 12 Step meetings. You can now attend a meeting and share your experience, strength, and hope from your home or on a morning walk.

Take a moment to recognize the gift that is virtual Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous. Online 12 Step meetings are a novelty worth being grateful for today. In recovery, expressing gratitude is always beneficial.

Addiction Recovery: A Year in Review

The end of the year is an excellent opportunity to look back and acknowledge your progress. Every day clean and sober is an accomplishment, to be sure, but there are other things worth taking stock of as you close out the year. You can ask yourself, ‘have I practiced the principles of recovery in all my affairs?’

Are there areas of your life that could use adjustment? Are you on track to achieve your short and long-term goals? Are you doing everything in your power to maintain a positive attitude, even when times are challenging?

The truth is that there is always room for improvement, but it’s still worth your time to review your successes. Taking stock of your big and small accomplishments is empowering. The activity is a reminder of why you do the work—day in and day out.

Maybe you have celebrated a recovery milestone; perhaps 2020 is when you got a year sober, or perhaps it was five years. This might have been the year when you first achieved 30, 60, or 90 days of sobriety.

Not every milestone is measured in years. 2020 might have been the year that you began paying it forward by sponsoring. Carrying the message and walking others through the Steps for the first time is a significant achievement. Becoming someone’s sponsor is worth recognition; it’s a sign that you are fully enmeshed in a program of addiction recovery.

Staying Positive Matters

With all the challenges we’ve faced this year and continue to push through, it’s easy to become disillusioned. Working a program of addiction recovery can be complicated by outside influences such as losing a job; tens of millions of Americans are currently out of work. Maybe you lost your job this year and have found it challenging to maintain a positive attitude. Perhaps you find it challenging to see some higher plan in the adversity you face.

It’s understandable to look back at the previous 350 days and despair. However, you must continue to put your addiction recovery first despite hardship. It’s critical to do everything in your power to maintain a positive attitude, especially when it’s darkest before the dawn. Simply trusting that the sun also rises will help.

Times are hard for countless Americans right now, but we are in this together. This too shall pass, remember that and you will be alright. We know it’s trying to keep a sunny disposition when facing adversity, but a positive attitude changes everything.

If you keep putting your addiction recovery first and your best foot forward, an opportunity will present itself eventually. Now more than ever, it’s essential to lean on the fellowship for support and guidance. If you need help, ask for it; trust and believe that another member will rise to the occasion.

Some men see things as they are and say why—I dream things that never were and say why not.” —George Bernard Shaw

Gender-Specific Addiction and Mental Health Treatment

One of the unfortunate byproducts of 2020 is a significant rise in drug and alcohol misuse. What’s more, more people than ever are battling anxiety and depression. Hardship begets despair.

If you are struggling with substance abuse or mental illness, please contact PACE Recovery Center to learn more about our programs and services. We offer gender-specific treatment for men who have a desire to turn their life around. Recovery is possible, and we can help.

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