Category Archives: Uncategorized

Mental Health Program for Young Men

Mental Health Program for Young Men

At PACE Recovery Center, we are pleased to announce the creation of our residential, mental health program for young men. Utilizing our proven treatment philosophy, along with evidence-based therapies, we help men make inroads in recovery. PACE’s multi-faceted approach to addressing mental illness helps adult males set recovery objectives and plot a course toward realizing their goals.

Mental health disorders are not a simple matter. Most individuals are unwilling to talk about their symptoms, let alone feel comfortable seeking assistance. The stigma surrounding mental diseases is pervasive, even though more than 300 million people face depression, globally. Anxiety disorders affect more than 260 million people. It is worth noting that major or persistent depressive disorder is just one form of mental health illness. Other common mental diseases include post-traumatic stress disorder or PTSD, bipolar disorder, and dual diagnosis.

Any mental illness (AMI) can significantly disrupt the course of a person’s life. Symptoms worsen, and overall health diminishes when AMI goes without treatment. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), depressive disorder is the leading cause of disability around the world. Men contending with untreated mental disease are at severe risk of self-medicating, self-harm, and suicidal ideation. It is critical that men battling mind diseases come to understand that treatment works, and recovery is within reaching distance.

Our CARF-accredited mental health program helps emerging young men build bridges to a life of productivity, relational healing and independence.

Empowering males caught in the grips of mental illness to ignore stigma and seek help is a challenging task. Although, the effort becomes easier when such people discover that effective, recovery support services exist. Supportive environments like the PACE Mental Health Program for Young Men.

You Are Not Alone

Mental health and the ability to access evidence-based treatment is a worldwide priority, to be sure. The most recent data indicates that millions of people in the United States are especially vulnerable. WHO reports that mental illness or disorder will affect 50 percent of Americans in their lifetime. Moreover, 1 in 25 Americans grapples with a severe mental illness, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depression, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Mental health treatment availability is slowly improving across the U.S. Unfortunately, 56.4 percent of adults with a mental illness have not received treatment, according to Mental Health America. More than 24 million Americans are living with untreated mental health disorders.

The statistics above are startling, and they can also help people gain perspective. However, data can be both abstract and meaningless for the person living with AMI. When one is on the baneful end of mental disease, it can be trying to relate to others’ problems. Once in recovery, on the other hand, men find that healing is a most collective endeavor. A realization that crops up first in treatment.

PACE is a brotherhood of men sharing common goals of managing mental health conditions and healing from trauma.

Under our care, clients find themselves in an environment that isn’t constricted by the societal stigma found elsewhere. The gender-specific program at PACE offers men a forum to discuss their symptoms with other men who face similar mood disorders. Adult males work together to adopt personal programs of recovery. Aided by a compassionate support staff – clinicians, psychiatrists, and clinical psychologists – and judgment-free environs, young men can openly share their feelings of doubt, fear, guilt, shame or sadness.

PACE Mental Health Program for Young Men

PACE’s highly credentialed clinical staff can help you or a loved one navigate, manage, and recover from mental health disorder(s). The clinical practices our team of experts employs are specifically tailored to the needs of each client’s diagnosis. If you would like to acquire more information about our residential or extended-care programs, please contact us today. PACE admissions counselors are standing by at your convenience: 877.405.9411.

Addiction Recovery Asks Us to Give Back

Addiction recovery involves taking care of yourself and then turning your attention toward helping others find the courage to do the same. It is a simple formula that can produce remarkable results. Seeking assistance, breaking the cycle of self-destructive behaviors, and working a program is a second chance. No one takes the journey alone; together we have an opportunity to strive for a productive future.

In the realm of Alcoholics Anonymous, there exist a list of 12 Promises. Number three reads as follows, ’We will not regret the past nor wish to shut the door on it.’ Instead, people in recovery learn from it; our past experiences serve as a reminder of where we hope never to be again. Men and women can share their story with heads held high to inspire courage in the newcomer.

Individuals who traverse addiction treatment and dedicate themselves to a program of recovery have enormous potential. Early on, people learn that if they stay the course they will have few limitations. College degrees, dream jobs, and starting families are some prime examples. No matter which path one chooses, there is a constant: long-term recovery depends on finding some avenue of giving back. Whether it be in the Rooms, or volunteering to share at a treatment center, each person’s story is the embodiment of hope.

Upon completing treatment, persons often decide to take steps to work in the field of addiction recovery. Their experience proves invaluable in serving as behavioral technicians, counselors, or doctors. However, there are other lines of work – outside of rehab centers – that people get into to “pay it forward.”

A Different Kind of Barber Shop

Naturally, not everyone desires to work in a substance use disorder treatment center. It is possible to help people struggling with addiction beyond rehab. Some individuals, who provide services that every person needs, are using their unique forums to help others overcome the devastating effects of drugs and alcohol.

Two young people in recovery who have a passion for cutting men’s hair also believe in the power of community. Luke Noreen and Rocco Danieli own and operate Over The Top Barbershop in Wakefield, Massachusetts, NBC 10 reports. On the surface, Over The Top appears to be similar to other urban barbershops. Although, closer observation reveals that more than hair is being cut in Noreen and Danieli’s business. These men are shearing the stigma of addiction plaguing people in their area, and helping others break free.

Mr. Noreen and Danieli are in addiction recovery. They do not shy from taking the risk of hiring people with similar stories. While most barbers display family photos on their mirrors, these two men feature pictures of young overdose death victims, according to the article. They both understand the dangers of substance use and relapse. At Over The Top, the overdose reversal drug Naloxone is on hand in case of an emergency.

Unfortunately, one of the barber chairs in the shop is currently unmanned. In the seat, there is a picture of a former employee named Dean who recently died of an overdose. Noreen and Danieli supported Dean in his recovery, and now they are helping Dean’s father overcome grief.

With the epidemic it is crazy out here I got I don’t know how many. This is happening all around us," said Danieli.

Giving Back In Addiction Recovery

Mr. Danieli is sober from alcohol now for three years, and he keeps his “Big Book” on hand at the shop. He’s played witness to the devastating effects of drug addiction on more than just people in the community. His brother is also in recovery, the article reports. Sadly, his two sisters are victims of fatal overdoses.

Being a barber is about taking care of the people.” – Anthony Hamilton

Co-founder, Luke Noreen, has a similar story to tell; although, his path involved drug use. He starting using as a teenager and almost didn't make it out; but, today he has a vision thanks to working a program. He has a future and helps others realize similar prospects.

We are always looking out for one another. We know everyone by their first name. We know their families. We know what their cousin is going through. We are making phone calls trying to get their friends their family member into a detox into a rehab," said Noreen.

Down the road, the two young men hope to do even more for their community. They envision a place to host meetings; where people can talk about the epidemic, without stigma.

"I was given a second chance, and I am not going to waste it. I want to help others," Danieli said.

Addiction Treatment for Men

At PACE Recovery Center, our clinical staff can help you or a loved one take steps to lead a life that is happy, joyous and free. We specialize in the treatment of addiction and co-occurring mental health disorders. Please reach out to us today to learn more about our programs.

Mental Health, Adoption, and Nature v. Nurture

In the field of mental health, there has long been a debate about nature versus nurture. What is more salient to the development of young people? Is it a person's genetic history or the environment of cultivation? Naturally, people find little ease in attempting to answer such questions. These types of queries have puzzled experts in the field of psychology for years.

Such lines of inquiry are attractive for many reasons. Who among us has not had questions about what makes you who you are? We can look to our parents for answers, and we can evaluate the environs of our upbringing. And yet, we can still come away with more questions than answers. This outcome can happen to just about anyone. However, it is especially the case for those who do not have a clear picture of their history, i.e., adopted people.

When probing for a deeper understanding of our existence, many are prone to concern themselves with why they do things a particular way. Others, those contending with mental illness, might try to make sense of their struggles with a sense of urgency. When doing so, the obvious starting point is one's mother and father. Studies frequently conclude that mental illness can run in the family. However, children do not always inherit their parents' mental diseases. Some mental health experts argue that other factors must be the catalyst of psychological struggle.

There are those too who present with mental health disorders, yet do not have a clear link to mental health disorders in their family tree. Making sense of all this is a difficult undertaking. Any attempts at understanding the origins of mental strife are roughly equivalent to disentangling a Gordian knot—unpacking an intractable problem.

Nature v. Nurture

Unraveling what makes you who you are is a trying task for anybody. Unfortunately, when a person hasn't any concrete knowledge about their genetic roots, it is an overwhelming endeavor. Potentially disheartening, too. Nobody perhaps understands this more than the adopted. People who are placed for adoption at birth have little to go on when attempting to get some clarity.

The desire to follow the bread crumbs of one's past is not uncommon for adopted men and women. Such pursuits can be eye-opening experiences. But, they can also reveal aspects of one's early history that are bound to induce pain. There is a fascinating example of adoption that drives this point home. It involves an unexpected discovery that irrevocably changes the lives of three young men living in New York in the 1980s.

This Sunday, CNN is presenting a new documentary shining a spotlight on how the pursuit of knowledge can have ineluctable consequences. We want to be careful here to not spoil or misrepresent the documentarians nor their subjects. So, in the following paragraphs, some basic facts will be put forth to pique your interest. Please prepare yourself for asking some tough questions about the age-old argument of nature vs. nurture.

The environment and our experiences influence who we become, right? Three young men had to face what that means in the wake of a monumental discovery. Robert Shafran, David Kellman, and Eddy Galland all grew up in separate households located within a hundred-mile radius. Then, at the nascent age of 19, they came to discover – by sheer luck – that they share a biological link. Directed by Tim Wardle, Three Identical Strangers shows what follows from a chance discovery. It is a story of joy and is cause for utter outrage.

Three Identical Strangers

By now, you may be asking why would an adoption agency separate the triplets? The answer, a study! A research project, cloaked in secrecy, to settle long-standing theories about the role genetic and environmental factors have on our lives.

Nothing, though, would prove easy or obvious about their stories, which grow darker and more disturbing as “Three Identical Strangers” develops into a shocker," writes Manohla Dargis, the co-chief film critic for The New York Times since 2004. "Puzzle piece by piece, interview by interview, Mr. Wardle fits together a grim story of hubristic doctors and their grotesquely unprincipled enablers who played with human lives in the name of science."

Three Identical Strangers is a lot to unpack, and at times hard to watch. People with experience in adoption and mental health disorders may begin asking themselves new types of questions about their past. The film will give you a first-hand look at the impact adoption can have on a person's life. It will show what can happen to individuals when they are separated, after spending the first six months of their lives by each other's side. It is highly likely that you will never contemplate the nature v. nurture question the same way again.


If you are having trouble watching, please click here.

Three Identical Strangers premieres on CNN Sunday, January 27, 2019, at 9 p.m. ET.

Adoption-Related Mental Health Treatment

At PACE Recovery Center, we give adopted men the tools to heal from mental health and adoption issues. Mental illness affects many people who are the product of adoption; even those who grow up in loving households face real challenges that can shape who they become.

Adopted individuals can struggle with a fear of rejection and connection; they are at high risk of developing insecure attachment styles which can precipitate anxiety and depression, emotional dysregulation, and substance abuse. Please contact us today to learn how treatment can transform your life and set you on a course toward long-term recovery.

Addiction Recovery Opens Career Doors

addiction recovery

When mind-altering substances are out of a person’s system, and a program of addiction recovery is established, many will ask, “What’s next?” Of course, the answer to that question is purely subjective. What is certain is that whatever people in recovery put their minds to can be accomplished.

Another truism for a good number of people in recovery is that they can’t go back to doing what they did before they broke the cycle of addiction. After undergoing treatment, there are some who find their previous lines of work or study untenable when leading a life in recovery. That’s not to say that there are not sober bartenders, for instance, but it’s not challenging to see why certain types of employment could jeopardize progress.

There are also young men and women in sobriety who have never held down a job. There are others who started college only to have their disease stymie the endeavor. So, with few points to jump off from in life after treatment, it is only natural that young adults will consider working in the field of addiction medicine. Moreover, people in recovery learn early on that to keep what they have they must also give it away—pay it forward. What better way to give back to the addiction recovery community than to help others find serenity, too?

In fact, it is quite common for treatment alums to volunteer their services at the very center that had a hand in saving their lives. Such individuals realize that by staying close to the source of their addiction recovery, they strengthen the foundation of their recovery. Going back home – for many people – is not always the best option following treatment.

Giving Back to The Addiction Recovery Community

Over time, volunteers or just those dedicated to sobriety often decide that the field of addiction medicine is a viable career path. One can be a productive member of society, reciprocate the gift of recovery to other willing people, and safeguard their sobriety in one fell swoop.

As one would expect, working in the substance use disorder workforce will require some education; or, a lot of schooling depending on how far one wants to go. Doctors in recovery, after all, are not unheard of, which is again a testament to the door-opening potential of working a program.

It goes without saying that attending college to become a counselor or a medical doctor will cost a significant amount of money. Except for a small demographic in America, higher education will call for student loans; and, such debts can accumulate quickly. However, we have some excellent news for anyone who is interested in working in the field of addiction recovery and medicine.

The Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Workforce Loan Repayment Program can help addiction treatment clinicians repay up to $75K in student loans, in exchange for a three-year commitment to provide substance use disorder treatment services at National Health Service Corps-approved sites. The Health Resources and Services Administration, an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, writes:

The purpose of the National Health Service Corps (NHSC) Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Workforce Loan Repayment Program (LRP) (hereafter referred to as the NHSC SUD Workforce LRP) is to recruit and retain medical, nursing, and behavioral/mental health clinicians with specific training and credentials to provide evidence-based SUD treatment and counselling [sic] in eligible communities of need designated as Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSAs).

A Career In Addiction Medicine

HSC SUD Workforce LRP participants have a choice between three years of full-time or part-time service. Those eligible will receive funds to repay their outstanding, qualifying, educational loans. One caveat is that those serving in a private facility are not eligible to practice half-time.

Dr. Gabriel Wishik, who works for Boston Health Care for the Homeless, took part in a loan repayment program from the same federal agency, according to MassLive. He points out that such programs do two things: help lure qualified candidates and increase the number of clinicians in a field that struggles to fill positions in many areas. He said, “there is a shortage at every single level in the treatment continuum.”

There are lots of competing career paths. It’s one way to get people into this career,” he said.

People in their first years of addiction recovery who have an interest in working in the field can benefit from looking to the HSC SUD Workforce LRP. At PACE Recovery Center, we encourage our clients to pursue higher education and know that men in their first years of recovery can make excellent substance use disorder technicians and clinicians. In fact, we have current team members who were once PACE Recovery Center clients.

PACE Academy

We understand that that pursuing higher education in recovery can be complicated; university culture, for instance, can put a person’s sobriety at risk. With that in mind, our PACE Academy program helps young men in early sobriety pursue their dreams and protect their sobriety. PACE Academy also provides Certified Alcohol Drug & Alcohol Associate credentialing for those interested in working in the field of addiction medicine.

Please contact us today to learn more about how you can reach your recovery and academic goals at Pace Academy.

Adoption Trauma, Mental Illness, and Addiction

adoption trauma

A study from 2012, appearing in the journal PLOS | ONE, demonstrates an increased risk of lifetime substance use disorders in adopted adults. A team of researchers from the University of Minnesota found that adoptees are at 1.87 times more significant risk of developing a SUD, compared to non-adoptees. The research indicates that this demographic is also more likely to contend with other psychiatric disorders as well.

While the above study is somewhat dated, the findings are as relevant today as when they were first published. Why adoptees are at greater risk often comes down to adoption trauma. According to PsychCentral, “adoption trauma is defined as the shock and pain of being permanently, abruptly separated from one’s family member.” The article notes that this form of trauma can be exacerbated by the “societal expectation that it [adoption trauma] shouldn’t exist at all. The article’s author cites a keen quote on this subject.

Adoption loss is the only trauma in the world where the victims are expected by the whole of society to be grateful.” –Reverend Keith C. Griffith

It isn’t difficult to grasp some of the struggles that adopted people face. Introspection can lead some individuals to believe that they are unwanted or unloved. The question of where a person came from – the genetic breadcrumb trail – can loom large. Not knowing one’s biological parents can cause distress as people age. If such people don’t have a method of coping with adoption trauma they are at a heightened risk of problems in the future.

Adoption Trauma, Mental Illness, and Addiction

Loss can lead to grief, to anger. Even those who never knew their biological parents can mourn their loss. Internal suffering early in life and into adulthood can position someone to cope with mental anguish in an unhealthy manner. What’s more, adoptees – whose birth parents (one or both) have a history of substance use issues – are significantly more likely to have their own struggles with drugs and alcohol. An unstable adoptive home is also a factor that can precipitate a person developing unhealthy coping mechanisms.

Research shows that 4.5% of adoptees had drug-abuse problems, compared to 2.9% of people in the general population, Health Magazine reports. Moreover, 8.6% with at least one biological parent who had substance issues, had their own drug problems. The findings – appearing in the Archives of General Psychiatry in 2016 – come from data on 18,115 adoptees born in Sweden between 1950 and 1993.

The link between adoption and mental illness often stems from insecure attachment styles. Young people who go into foster care or are adopted, or both, face many uncertainties. They are forced to adapt to many situations. Not knowing what the future holds or where a person will end up, for instance, can wreak havoc on one’s psyche. Insecure attachment styles include:

  • Anxious-preoccupied: a negative view of self and positive view of others.
  • Dismissive-avoidant: a positive view of self and negative view of others.
  • Fearful-avoidant: an unstable fluctuating/confused view of self and view of others.

Insecure, inconsistent attachment styles can result in mental health conditions developing, i.e., anxiety and depression. What’s more, such experiences can bring about unhealthy coping mechanisms such as substance use. It is paramount that both mental health, and how a person copes, are addressed simultaneously for successful outcomes.

PACE Adoption-Related Treatment

Stigma accompanies both adoption and mental illness. The shame that many adoptees have about their past, the guilt that people have about their mental illness, can stand in the way of seeking help. While challenging, it is still possible to break through stigma and access treatment.

At PACE Recovery Center, we have helped many adopted people find long-term recovery. We offer a track that caters specifically to adopted men who are struggling with mental illness. Led by Brett Furst, M.A., MFTI, our adoption-related treatment utilizes several specialized approaches to help clients address the underlying causes of mental health issues and addiction. Aided by a safe and supportive environment, PACE assists adopted men in fostering healthy, secure attachment styles.

Please contact us today to learn more about our program and how we can help you manage adoption trauma, mental illness, and addiction.

Mental Illness Impacts Physical Health

mental illness

With 2019 underway some Americans are scheduled for their annual medical physical. A yearly checkup for all-things-health is strongly advised, especially for people with preëxisting conditions. The majority of adults know what to expect when they see their primary care physician or PCP for a physical. A trip to the scale is to see if one is overweight, a reflex hammer to the knee, and saying aah. A litany of questions may follow about an individual's physical health, but there is little guarantee that the patient is asked about mental illness. Will your doctor ask if you are depressed or anxious?

Why is inquiring about mental illness significant during an annual physical? Because the mind and body are inextricably linked. Many people may not understand that diseases of the brain can wreak havoc on the body over time. When conditions like depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and post-traumatic stress do not receive treatment—a person's life can take a turn for the worse.

Over the years, researchers have sought to identify a link between mental health illness and poor physical wellbeing with mixed results. However, a new study compares the effect of anxiety and depression on the body to that of smoking and obesity. The latter two are usually a top concern among PCPs, whereas the former couple is not.

Mental Illness May Be Leading Predictors Physical Health Problems

Researchers Andrea Niles, Ph.D., and Aoife O'Donovan, Ph.D., of the UCSF Department of Psychiatry and the San Francisco VA Medical Center, found that patients with high levels of anxiety and depression are at severe risk of physical sickness, according to a UCSF news release. Of more than 15,000 patients, 2,225 suffered from high levels of anxiety and depression. First author Niles and senior author O'Donovan found that such patients are:

  • 65 percent more likely to face heart condition;
  • 64 percent for stroke;
  • 50 percent for high blood pressure; and,
  • 87 for arthritis.

Dr. Niles and O'Donovan observed that people with untreated depression and anxiety face similar risks to experience the above conditions as smokers and obese people, the article reports. The study appears in the journal Health Psychology.

Anxiety and depression symptoms are strongly linked to poor physical health, yet these conditions continue to receive limited attention in primary care settings, compared to smoking and obesity," said Niles. "To our knowledge this is the first study that directly compared anxiety and depression to obesity and smoking as prospective risk factors for disease onset in long-term studies."

Interestingly, and contrary to popular belief, the researchers found no associations between high levels of anxiety and depression and cancer. On the other hand, those affected by these issues are exponentially more likely to contend with a headache, stomach upset, back pain, and shortness of breath.

"On top of highlighting that mental health matters for a whole host of medical illnesses, it is important that we promote these null findings,” said O'Donovan. “We need to stop attributing cancer diagnoses to histories of stress, depression and anxiety."

The research highlights the need for PCPs to inquire about symptoms of mental illness. Diagnosing anxiety and depression conditions is the first step toward treatment and recovery.

Orange County Mental Health Treatment

We invite adult males who are struggling with mental illness to reach out to PACE Recovery Center to learn more about our mental health intensive outpatient program (IOP). Our team can advocate for your wellbeing and give you the tools for managing your illness.

We are always available at 800-526-1851, to answer any questions; or, you can submit a confidential online inquiry here.

Addiction Recovery Strengthened Through Exercise

addiction

As an addiction treatment center, PACE Recovery Center hopes that everyone working a program has a plan for New Year’s Eve. Our most recent posts provide some guidance for keeping recovery intact and setting resolutions you can follow. 2019 is about to get underway, and it can be a year of continued progress.

People who undergo addiction treatment learn that physical and spiritual health is a top priority. Men and women who seek to overcome and recover from mental illness benefit from leading a healthier life. Many addiction treatment centers encourage clients to engage in athletic activities as a means of facilitating healing. Persistent drug and alcohol use takes a toll on both mind and body, requiring healing. To that end, allotting a few hours each week to exercise establishes a healthy behavior and promotes wellbeing.

Substance use is a behavior that carries severe risks to one's health. However, once drugs and alcohol are out of the picture doesn't mean necessarily that an individual's mind and body will bounce right back. Encouraging wellbeing means eating nutritional foods and making an exercise routine. People living with physical disabilities will have to scale back such activities some, but they can benefit from physical fitness too.

Each year, at this time, many people in recovery resolve themselves to make physical fitness a priority. It is possible to lead a healthier existence in recovery and strengthen other areas of one's life just by taking a little time to get the heart beating faster. Naturally, routines should be realistic; no need to overdo it and risk burning out or worse, get hurt. Individuals currently in addiction treatment should ask counselors for guidance. Those working a program outside rehab can turn to their support group for support and perhaps an exercise partner.

How Can Exercise Help My Addiction Recovery?

Research regarding the benefits of exercise, in recovery, can be difficult to unpack. There are several studies on the topic. There are many approaches, each person has to find a routine that works well. Whichever one decides (i.e., jogging, biking, or swimming) most experts agree, physical fitness aids recovery outcomes. While working out alone will by no means lead to recovery, exercising in conjunction with psychotherapy and mutual-help groups, for instance, is quite beneficial.

Claire Twark M.D., writing for the Harvard Health Blog, points out some of the positives of exercise in recovery. Dr. Twark works at Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital Addiction Recovery Program in Massachusetts. She has found that "exercise helps to distract them [patients with various substance use disorders] from cravings. Workouts add structure to the day. They help with forming positive social connections, and help treat depression and anxiety in combination with other therapies."

In her article, Dr. Twark highlights nonprofit organizations advocating for physical activity for people in recovery. As such, individuals can do more than just promote physical wellbeing, they can exercise for a sense of community. The Boston Bulldogs Running Club is for people with addiction and their friends and families. The Phoenix is a community of sober individuals bonding through peer-led CrossFit, yoga, rock climbing, boxing, running, and hiking events. Such activities occur across the country, as well as in the area north and south of PACE, in Long Beach and Costa Mesa, CA.

Those thinking of incorporating an exercise routine into their program of recovery will experience health benefits. Continuing to promote physical well-being outside of addiction treatment, provides an outlet for a more significant sense of community. If exercise is a resolution of yours, again, please consult with your support group. There is always strength in numbers.

Addiction Treatment In 2019

Many men who are currently struggling with alcohol or substance use disorder would like 2019 to be a year of change. However, embarking on a quest for healing is an objective that requires assistance. At PACE Recovery Center, it would be our great pleasure to be part of your incredible journey into recovery. Please contact us today to make the New Year one of progress.

The Gentlemen of PACE Recovery Center would like to wish everyone a safe and recovery-focused New Year’s Eve.

Addiction Recovery Comes First On Holidays

addiction recovery

Last week, we wrote at length about people in addiction recovery making flexible and adjustable resolutions. We also included a brief section about observing major holidays as one might any other day of the year. It is critical to avoid giving specific days of the year more power than they deserve. Stress and emotional turmoil can accompany holidays, but such feelings should not be an excuse to use drugs and alcohol.

Christmas is drawing near, and New Year's Eve is close behind. It is vital to go over some techniques for keeping your recovery intact into 2019. Each person working a program of recovery has tools at their disposal for coping with trying situations. For many people, being around family can precipitate mental strain. Fortunately, individuals who practice the principles of recovery can make it through any holiday.

Conversely, some individuals whose families are not currently a part of their lives are prone to melancholy. Active addiction steals much from a person. The choices one makes in service to their disease can result in familial estrangement. Having the knowledge that you are not welcome at a holiday gathering can lead to mental fatigue. Such people are more apt to start feeling sorry for themselves and are at a heightened risk of experiencing problems.

Protecting Your Addiction Recovery During The Holidays

Each individual in addiction recovery has different life circumstances, and nothing is set in stone. Recovering addicts' lives change regularly. One must do their best to manage and cope with family-induced stress or loneliness. It's possible to avoid recovery pitfalls during Christmas and New Year's, and your support network can help. Those who stay close to their circle and are honest about their limitations can stay on track. Below you will find some helpful tips for preventing relapse this Christmas and New Year's Eve.

First, develop tactics for attending family gatherings. Also, have a plan for weathering the blues that can come from not being in the company of relatives. A strategy for either for each must include attending meetings of recovery. Groups are held around the clock during every significant holiday. Prioritize catching a meeting both before and after attending family events. Those who are not expected at the Christmas dinner can use the free time to be in the company of recovery peers. People in addiction recovery will often host sober holiday gatherings, too. It is imperative to ask around and find ways to fill your holiday schedule.

Second, the holiday season is notorious for overeating and lounging around the house. Prioritizing self-care is helpful. People in recovery can never lose sight of the importance of maintaining their spiritual and physical exercise routines. Addiction recovery is about balance, and prayer and meditation help keep one's equilibrium. Individuals who exercise daily can benefit from finding time for light exercise on Christmas. Not giving certain days of the year power means sticking to one's normal recovery routine as much as possible.

Positive Attitude Changes Everything

Each person is at a different point in addiction recovery. Meaning, some people may not yet be where they want to be. The gifts of uninterrupted sobriety, after all, come when the time is right—not a moment sooner. In the meantime, it is essential to maintain a positive attitude regardless of having family in your life or not.

Those not yet where they would like to be in life can take comfort in recognizing the progress made thus far. Each day clean and sober is a source of pride. People in their first year of sobriety should be able to easily remember how unfortunate life was just a short time ago. The coming holidays may not look the way one hopes, but it will seem significantly better than what would be without recovery.

Whatever one's schedule looks like on December 25th or 31st, family time or not, everything will be copacetic if you keep doing the next right thing for your addiction recovery throughout the day. Remind yourself of the importance of maintaining an open mind. Be accepting of those around you and minimize expectations. Most importantly, remember that a positive attitude changes everything.

Christmas is a season for kindling the fire for hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.” ―Washington Irving

The Gentlemen of PACE Recovery Center would like to wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. We are hopeful that people in recovery will practice the principles and utilize their toolbox for a safe and sober holiday. Please contact us if you require assistance for alcohol or substance use disorder.

Addiction Recovery Resolutions You Can Keep

addiction recovery

One of the first things people working a program of addiction recovery recognizes is that nobody is perfect. Believe it or not, striving for perfection is one of the markers of many individual's diseases. Each of us – in recovery or not – are works-in-progress. As long as we are working towards continual growth, then we are on the right track.

Men and women in early recovery have much to consider on a daily basis. Each day, one sets him or herself to task by always putting sobriety first. We manage such a goal by prioritizing selflessness, responsibility, and accountability to your program and support network. If you endeavor to be an active participant in your recovery, and that of others, it is harder to entertain detrimental thoughts. When a person stresses the importance of being useful to their peers, others will reciprocate. The road to lasting recovery is paved together.

In the twelfth hour of 2018, some of you are probably thinking about the previous 300 plus days. You may be contemplating how far you have come since deciding to break the cycle of addiction. Maybe you are thinking about the ways your life has changed in a relatively short period? Transformation can happen, at times, without us even realizing; the rigmarole of routine can blind us to advancements. Still, reviewing the past year with an eye for improvements is an excellent practice. Moreover, now is also an ideal opportunity to consider areas in your life that still require fine-tuning. Again, there is no pinnacle in recovery; we are always growing in addiction recovery.

Another Day In Addiction Recovery

Another valuable bit of wisdom individuals glean in early sobriety is to stay present. Progress happens at its own pace for each; so, spending too much time thinking about what's next can be hazardous. That's not to say you can't set goals for yourself; you can, it's just that one must do so with caution. One's ambitions are more likely to come to fruition if they are reasonable. Setting unrealistic targets can result in an upset; and, upset can beget guilt and shame. The latter two emotions are a recipe for relapse.

With the New Year drawing nearer, people in addiction recovery can benefit from planning out the next two weeks or so. Hanukkah is behind some people, but Christmas is on the horizon for many more. Of course, December 31 is a day of note for everyone.

With celebratory days in mind, creating a schedule for the coming weeks is perhaps more vital than ever for people working a program. Those who are brand new to recovery can benefit from staying especially close to their peers at this time. Heed the advice of your support group, and you will find yourself in 2019 with sobriety intact. When Christmas and New Year's Eve knock at the door, ever remind yourself that each is just another day in recovery.

Taking power out of something like a holiday will alleviate some of the stress that accompanies extraordinary times of the year. The less turmoil you have to manage, the more time you can spend meeting your objectives. Lastly, let's consider making resolutions for the year to come and healthy methods of setting targets for oneself.

Reasonable Resolutions for Addiction Recovery

If you find yourself with some downtime shortly, grab pen and paper and jot down some thoughts. Think long and honestly about your current strengths and that which might be holding you back. As mentioned above, it's critical to avoid unrealistic targets. For instance, someone racked with a colossal amount of debt is probably not going to get out of arrears entirely in 2019. Setting one's sights too high will almost certainly precipitate disappointment. Instead, prioritizing saving money each month in 2019 to put towards one's deficit is a more reasonable objective.

Set flexible and adjustable resolutions for yourself and avoid either-or scenarios. Remember that few things are black or white and don't etch the achievements you hope to make in stone. Targets for advancements should be malleable; life changes invariably, so will your aspirations.

Missions that people in early recovery can complete can include eating healthier or exercising a few days a week. Giving up tobacco, perhaps? Another realistic target is chiseling out time for volunteering your services to the recovery community once a week. Maybe you'd like to explore other meetings outside your standard circuit; you can resolve to attend one new group a week, for example. Having the goal of introducing yourself to newcomers more often is one that is manageable. Set resolutions that are not monumental in size and scope.

Always remember that resolutions are more attainable when you make adaptations for yourself, not someone else. It's nice to want to make others happy, but you must be wary of your motives. People often find that when they make personal improvements, it has the effect of making others joyful. Throughout the coming year take time to acknowledge the small victories and milestones, doing so will incentivize continued effort in addiction recovery.

Southern California Addiction Treatment

We invite men, in the grips of alcohol or substance use disorder, to contact us to learn more about PACE Recovery Center. We address all components of addiction and mental health; our multi-dimensional approach to recovery helps males lead a life that is happy, joyous and free.

Recovery-Friendly Employment In America

recovery

Being a young man in addiction recovery means starting drug and alcohol use as a teen. Maintaining an unhealthy relationship with substances leaves little time for life skills proficiency. Meaning, the above demographic is often ill-equipped for the workforce at the onset of recovery.

A significant aspect of evidence-based addiction treatment is preparing clients for what comes next. Leading a life of abstinence is critical to recovery, but so is being a productive member of society. Achieving long-term sobriety is contingent upon prioritizing usefulness to society. With employment opportunity comes a sense of responsibility, to work and peers. Those who emphasize the importance of accountability are also far more likely to stay on track in their program. When it feels like you are of value to your coworkers, it increases your feeling of self-worth.

Many young men who enter treatment have never held down a job. Even those who manage to eke out a college degree can find themselves unprepared for the mortal coil of employment. Addiction treatment gives such people the opportunity to learn how to manage stress without resorting to drugs and alcohol. At PACE, we impress upon men that long-term recovery is more than not using alcohol or drugs, it's about living life.

Working In Recovery

In early sobriety, landing and holding down employment is paramount to successful outcomes. One of the most significant obstacles to progress is idle time. Individuals without purpose are far more likely to regress into selfishness and self-centeredness. Seeking a job (when healthy enough) gets people out of their head when life in recovery is still fresh. Rejoining the community is a rewarding experience and is a source of pride.

Finding methods of staying productive is critical. Those who are struggling to secure employment can still find healthy outlets through volunteering. After all, finding a stable job can prove challenging to some men with addictive pasts. One unfortunate byproduct of substance use is often a criminal record; a hindrance, yes, a job stopper, no!

Today, several American employers take a different stance when it comes to hiring people. They no longer see the value of flatly denying opportunities to people with a history of addiction. People in recovery are finding that lying on applications is no longer necessary to land jobs. The above reality is especially true in states with small hiring pools and heightened rates of use disorder.

Addiction Recovery-Friendly Employers

Hypertherm is a company making industrial cutting tools in New Hampshire. What makes Hypertherm unique, it is one of 70 "recovery-friendly" employers in the state, The Washington Post reports. What does recovery-friendly mean? It indicates a corporation is eroding the stigma of addiction and empowering people in sobriety. Such organizations achieve those ends by turning a blind eye to employment gaps and criminal records stemming from drug use.

Companies like Hypertherm, handle drug use and relapse the way other employers make exceptions for medical issues in the workplace, according to the article. Instead of terminating an employee whose substance use becomes active again, Hypertherm is supportive.

We’re here. We understand,” said Jenny Levy, Hypertherm’s vice president of people, community and environment. “If you’re seeking recovery, we’re here for you.”

Employers have an appreciation for the statistics of addiction and recovery in the U.S. Federal data makes clear that about 22 million Americans are in recovery. Refusing to hire people with substance use in their past can make it hard to fill positions. Hopefully, more companies will adopt Hypertherm's approach to recruiting and encourage personal progress. When hires don't have to disguise their mental illness they prosper, as does the company. We all benefit when Americans living with addiction are given a chance to be productive.

As a nation, we have a long way to go with encouraging more companies to look past substance use disorder. A 2017 study by the Recovery Research Institute at Massachusetts General Hospital indicates 9.2 percent of people in recovery are unemployed, involuntarily.

Addiction Treatment for Young Adults

At PACE Recovery Center, our priority is to equip men with the tools and skills to live healthy, happy, and balanced lives. Our licensed professional counselors and therapists help young men set goals and learn to manage their time and budget finances. The structured program at PACE provides young adults with the support necessary for acquiring employment.

We welcome adult males seeking long-term recovery to contact us to learn more about PACE. 800-526-1851