National Recovery Month – Join The Voices

National Recovery MonthTogether, we can, and do recover from addiction. Those who suffer from substance use disorder are not lost, but rather they are living with a debilitating mental health disorder which, left untreated, can be deadly. There was a time when recovering from addiction consisted of what is known as “white knuckling” it, that is when one gives up drugs and alcohol but has nothing to replace it with. Those who fell into that category were often considered to be a glum lot, angry about being unable to use mind altering substances the way “normal” people can. Suffice it to say, they are not considered fun to be around. The advent of 12-Step recovery programs was a paradigm shift with regard to breaking the cycle of addiction. To put it simply, those living with addiction had a metaphorical hole that alcohol and drugs filled; by working the 12-Steps people could fill that hole by connecting with a higher power and helping others find recovery. Naturally, there are 12-Steps for a reason, and recovery under that model requires working them all—and reworking them in order to maintain constant contact with the higher power of each person’s choosing. Sadly, some addicts and alcoholics are unable to be completely honest with themselves and others, and work a program; maybe they will be able to surrender down the road, but it does not always happen the first time around. For those who have been able to do the work, stick to the principles of recovery and help others—the sky’s the limit. There is no cap on the amount of gifts that a program of recovery can provide—sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. Everyone who continues to recover from drug and alcohol abuse, day in and day out, should take a moment to be proud of how far they have come—especially since National Recovery Month happens every September.

National Recovery Month

Over the last 27 years, September has been designated as National Recovery Month. Over the next 30 days there will be recovery related events held all over the United States with several different goals. Of top concern are efforts to break the stigma of addiction, which is a clinically accepted form of mental health disorder. What’s more, bringing to the attention of those still abusing drugs and alcohol that not only is help available, recovery is possible. By acknowledging and applauding the efforts of those who have managed to get and stay sober, we can encourage others to seek help. In 2016, the theme is Join the Voices for Recovery: Our Families, Our Stories, Our Recovery! Which, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), is about pointing out the value of family support throughout recovery.

Family Addiction and Family Recovery

Addiction is like a bomb. Ground-zero being the addict or alcoholic. And just like a bomb there is fallout, i.e. friends and family. Addiction can, and does, wreak havoc on the entire family. Recovery is as important for the person living with a substance use disorder, as it is for the family. National Recovery Month 2016 encourages individuals in recovery and their family to share their personal stories of heartache and successes in recovery they have made, with the hope that it will encourage others to seek the help they so desperately need. If you would like to Join the Voices of Recovery to help inspire others, please click here. If you would like to watch personal stories of recovery on Recovery Month's YouTube, please click here. Below is an example of one young man’s story: If you are having trouble viewing the video, please click here.

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