Recovery-Friendly Employment In America

recovery

Being a young man in addiction recovery means starting drug and alcohol use as a teen. Maintaining an unhealthy relationship with substances leaves little time for life skills proficiency. Meaning, the above demographic is often ill-equipped for the workforce at the onset of recovery.

A significant aspect of evidence-based addiction treatment is preparing clients for what comes next. Leading a life of abstinence is critical to recovery, but so is being a productive member of society. Achieving long-term sobriety is contingent upon prioritizing usefulness to society. With employment opportunity comes a sense of responsibility, to work and peers. Those who emphasize the importance of accountability are also far more likely to stay on track in their program. When it feels like you are of value to your coworkers, it increases your feeling of self-worth.

Many young men who enter treatment have never held down a job. Even those who manage to eke out a college degree can find themselves unprepared for the mortal coil of employment. Addiction treatment gives such people the opportunity to learn how to manage stress without resorting to drugs and alcohol. At PACE, we impress upon men that long-term recovery is more than not using alcohol or drugs, it's about living life.

Working In Recovery

In early sobriety, landing and holding down employment is paramount to successful outcomes. One of the most significant obstacles to progress is idle time. Individuals without purpose are far more likely to regress into selfishness and self-centeredness. Seeking a job (when healthy enough) gets people out of their head when life in recovery is still fresh. Rejoining the community is a rewarding experience and is a source of pride.

Finding methods of staying productive is critical. Those who are struggling to secure employment can still find healthy outlets through volunteering. After all, finding a stable job can prove challenging to some men with addictive pasts. One unfortunate byproduct of substance use is often a criminal record; a hindrance, yes, a job stopper, no!

Today, several American employers take a different stance when it comes to hiring people. They no longer see the value of flatly denying opportunities to people with a history of addiction. People in recovery are finding that lying on applications is no longer necessary to land jobs. The above reality is especially true in states with small hiring pools and heightened rates of use disorder.

Addiction Recovery-Friendly Employers

Hypertherm is a company making industrial cutting tools in New Hampshire. What makes Hypertherm unique, it is one of 70 "recovery-friendly" employers in the state, The Washington Post reports. What does recovery-friendly mean? It indicates a corporation is eroding the stigma of addiction and empowering people in sobriety. Such organizations achieve those ends by turning a blind eye to employment gaps and criminal records stemming from drug use.

Companies like Hypertherm, handle drug use and relapse the way other employers make exceptions for medical issues in the workplace, according to the article. Instead of terminating an employee whose substance use becomes active again, Hypertherm is supportive.

We’re here. We understand,” said Jenny Levy, Hypertherm’s vice president of people, community and environment. “If you’re seeking recovery, we’re here for you.”

Employers have an appreciation for the statistics of addiction and recovery in the U.S. Federal data makes clear that about 22 million Americans are in recovery. Refusing to hire people with substance use in their past can make it hard to fill positions. Hopefully, more companies will adopt Hypertherm's approach to recruiting and encourage personal progress. When hires don't have to disguise their mental illness they prosper, as does the company. We all benefit when Americans living with addiction are given a chance to be productive.

As a nation, we have a long way to go with encouraging more companies to look past substance use disorder. A 2017 study by the Recovery Research Institute at Massachusetts General Hospital indicates 9.2 percent of people in recovery are unemployed, involuntarily.

Addiction Treatment for Young Adults

At PACE Recovery Center, our priority is to equip men with the tools and skills to live healthy, happy, and balanced lives. Our licensed professional counselors and therapists help young men set goals and learn to manage their time and budget finances. The structured program at PACE provides young adults with the support necessary for acquiring employment.

We welcome adult males seeking long-term recovery to contact us to learn more about PACE. 800-526-1851

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