Tag Archives: Thanksgiving

Navigating Recovery This Thanksgiving With A Grateful Heart

recovery

The beginning of the holiday season kicks off this week, which means it’s time to count your blessings. Those in recovery must fortify their defenses and batten down their spiritual hatches if one’s program is to remain intact. One of the most effective ways of ensuring relapse doesn’t become part of one’s story over Thanksgiving is to maintain an attitude of gratitude.

Expressing thankfulness and appreciation in every area of one’s life is significant to maintaining a program. If you have accrued some recovery time, then some people have been instrumental to you in achieving your goals. Nobody recovers on their own; we do this together. We’d be wise to remind ourselves of this regularly; we wouldn’t be where we are today without help.

Call to mind when you arrived in treatment, a shell of your former self. It’s likely you heard someone tell you that everything is going to be alright. Remember the first person in a meeting who reached out their hand to you and expressed interest in your success. There are, no doubt, several instances you can recall when a fellow in recovery offered their support, unsolicited. People who pay forward what they received gratis in the program is what keeps this remarkable enterprise going. You have or will do the same when the time is right, the cycle of recovery depends upon everyone’s participation.

Cultivate the habit of being grateful for every good thing that comes to you, and to give thanks continuously. And because all things have contributed to your advancement, you should include all things in your gratitude.” ― Ralph Waldo Emerson

Recovery: Your Gratitude is Required

Making an effort to express your gratitude for others is not always easy. There are times when it’s hard to recognize all the good in your life and all the people who have your back. A helping hand is often gentle, words of support are sometimes just a whisper, but everyone owes aspects of their recovery to a higher power and specific individuals.

Even those of you who are new to the program know the importance of sharing your gratitude with others. It’s likely that your counselors and sponsor suggested prayer and meditation as a means for ensuring progress. Recovery is a spiritual program, once we realize that most things in life are out of our control, it becomes easier to open our hearts to a higher power. Such a “life-force will” is the glue that holds our recovery together, which means acknowledgment of that fact is vital. Only a power greater-than-ourselves can restore us to sanity, so we must continually turn our will and our lives over to that force. A daily commitment to be thankful for everything and everyone who had a hand in our progression.

In early recovery, many people struggle to converse with their higher power, for numerous reasons. After years of substance use and reliance on oneself for survival makes it difficult to accept help. A mindset of self-will and self-reliance makes it hard to believe that there might be something else designing the architecture of our lives. However, that doesn’t mean starting a dialogue is impossible; with practice and an attitude of gratitude, anything is possible.

Let gratitude be the pillow upon which you kneel to say your nightly prayer. And let faith be the bridge you build to overcome evil and welcome good.” ― Maya Angelou

Allowing Gratitude to Carry You Through the Holidays

If you are a young adult, who is relatively new to working a program, you might be dreading Thanksgiving. Perhaps this Thursday is the first time you will be home since going through addiction treatment? If you are like most people in this situation, you’re preparing yourself for a salvo of questions from loved ones at the dinner table. It’s doubtful you are thrilled about the prospect of having to explain to your uncle why you can’t drink a beer with him. Describing both the core and the minutiae of a program that is not easily put into words probably doesn’t bring joy to your heart. Nevertheless, if you are going home there are things you can do to keep stress at bay.

There is a good chance you had the help of a family member in bringing about your recovery. Whether mom and dad drove you to treatment or financially supported your decision to get help, your family played an important role in your recovery. They may have questions regarding your mission to live life on life’s terms, which you can attempt to answer patiently. Or, you can just say that you are not in a position to explain something adequately, so you’d rather not. In early recovery, individuals often follow suggestions without fully understanding the value of the suggested behavior. In time, the real importance of an action will reveal itself, but for now, it’s alright not to have the answer.

If you find yourself having to field your family's questions, you won’t get as stressed if you remind yourself that their curiosity comes from caring, not scrutiny. No one in recovery can afford to let their emotions get the best of them during a holiday, the risks of doing so are profound. If a family member is starting to get under your skin, simply walk away and call your sponsor. If your distress doesn’t dissipate still, find your way to a meeting pronto; rest assured that many of the people you will find in that meeting share your current sentiments.

Let us be grateful to the people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.” ― Marcel Proust

Happy Thanksgiving

Whether you have one month or one year sober, you’ve much to be grateful for today. If you make an effort on Thanksgiving to share your gratitude with others, it will make the day go by easier. Remember your tools and the skills you acquired in treatment, and relapse won’t be a part of your recovery.

The gentlemen of PACE Recovery Center would like to wish everyone in recovery a safe, sober, and happy Thanksgiving. We are proud of your accomplishments, and we hope that you are, too.

Staying Connected With Your Recovery

recoveryIf you are an active member of an addiction recovery program, then you are probably acutely aware of the fact that your addiction is just waiting for you to slip up and welcome drugs and alcohol back into your life. Addiction is a treatable condition. Through continued spiritual maintenance and active participation in one of many recovery support programs—we can, and do recover. But we can never delude ourselves in thinking that addiction can be cured, or that one day you will wake up and declare, “I’m an ex-alcoholic or ex-addict.” Just like the diabetic who takes insulin every day, their condition is not cured but rather contained. Every day people working a program of addiction recovery need to take certain steps to ensure, or rather, mitigate the chance of a relapse. Without active participation in your own recovery, long-sobriety is unlikely. Addiction does not take a day off from trying to find its way back into the forefront of one’s life, so then, it stands to reason that your recovery does not accumulate vacation time. To think otherwise, as many have, is nothing short of dangerous. As we approach the holiday season, it is vital that you keep this in mind, otherwise you may slip back into old behaviors and potentially relapse.

Staying Sober This Thanksgiving

Addiction recovery is difficult under normal day-to-day circumstances. Having a bad day, or letting yourself become stressed, angry or tired can hamper one’s program; if such feelings are not quickly addressed, bad decisions can follow. While holidays are supposed to be about joining friends and family in celebration, for people in recovery, such days can quickly become too much to handle. With Thanksgiving just over 24 hours away, it is important that you recognize how strong you are in your recovery—particularly regarding your ability to be around family. Let’s face it, holidays can be tumultuous even for people who do not have a substance use disorder. But unlike the average person, uncomfortable and stressful environments can take a toll on one’s recovery—leading to rash decisions that can result in picking up a drink or a drug. If you know that you will be attending a family gathering this Thursday, be sure to discuss it with your sponsor and the other members of your support network. There is a good chance that this can aid in guiding you through the holiday by helping you spot situations that may be risky, such as associating with relatives who you used to get drunk or high with during holidays past. What’s more, there is a good chance that they will tell you to always have your phone handy so that you can reach out before a particular matter gets out of hand. If you follow the suggestions of the people in the program who have more sober holidays under their belt, then there is no reason for you to have to open your eyes Friday morning with regret on your mind.

Staying Connected With Recovery

Many people working a program of recovery have yet to fully clean up the wreckage of their past. Meaning, presently their family may not be a part of their life. It is a reality that can be hard to deal with during the holidays. At PACE Recovery Center, we implore you to not be discouraged about the people that you do not have in your life, and take stock in those who are an active part of your life. If you have no familial obligations this Thursday, use it as an opportunity to be there for your fellow recovering alcoholics or addicts. During the course of Thanksgiving, there will be meetings occurring around the clock and you would do yourself a service by attending some of them. You may have something to share at a meeting that can help another who is new to recovery: A person who might be contemplating giving up on recovery before they have a chance to experience some of the miracles. Recovery is only possible if we help each other stay the course. We would like to wish everyone in recovery a drug and alcohol free Thanksgiving. Every obstacle you overcome, only serves to strengthen your program. Please remember:
  • Avoid getting hungry, angry, lonely or tired (HALT).
  • Stay connected to your support network as much as possible.
  • Stay clear of risky people, places and things.
  • Keep your phone charged, turned on and easily accessible.
  • Don’t drink or drug, no matter what.

Gratitude and Recovery On Thanksgiving

gratitudeThanksgiving Day is upon us once again, a time to join together with friends and family and rejoice. Thursday marks the beginning of the holiday season as well, followed by Christmas, Chanukah and New Years. While the holidays are a special time all around, for those of us in recovery it can also be a trying time, with a high likelihood of one’s recovery being put to the test.

Staying on top of your program…

During this time of the year it is paramount that one stay on top of their recovery program, lest we walk astray. For many in recovery, the holidays bring back old memories (some good, some bad), and feelings can arise that can be difficult to handle. There are many in recovery who are still estranged from their family, it may take years to heal the wounds inflicted by one’s addiction. Do not be discouraged, take comfort in your recovery family and continue making living amends.

Sharing your gratitude…

Be grateful for the gifts you have today because of your recovery. Gratitude can go along way during the holidays, having the power to ground you when times get tough. It can help to make a gratitude list, such as your sponsor and recovery peers. Everyone working a program of recovery has much to be thankful for. Sometimes putting that which you are grateful for on paper makes it more concrete and tangible. You might be surprised how much a gratitude inventory can help. As with all commandments, gratitude is a description of a successful mode of living. The thankful heart opens our eyes to a multitude of blessings that continually surround us. -Faust-

Celebrating the holiday…

If you are planning on attending a family gathering or holiday work party, you are probably aware that alcohol could be present. For those that are new to recovery, it is important that you tread carefully. If possible, try to find someone who has a significant amount of time in the program to accompany you to such events. It is a good rule of thumb to leave holiday gatherings early, before people become inebriated. It is not only safer for your recovery, it is no fun being around people who are intoxicated. It is always a good practice to attend your home group during a holiday. It gives you a chance to share how you are feeling with your peers. If you are struggling, you may get some feedback from your peers that helps you get through the day. In many areas around the country, meetings will be held on every hour of the day. It’s not uncommon for people to attend several meetings during a holiday. At Pace Recovery Center, we wish everyone a wonderful Thanksgiving - free from drugs and alcohol. ___________________________________________________________________________ If you are or a loved one is struggling with addiction, please contact Pace Recovery Center.

Thanksgiving Traditions Include Expressing Gratitude With Sharing

Gratitude is the inward feeling of kindness received. Thankfulness is the natural impulse to express that feeling. Thanksgiving is the following of that impulse.

Henry van Dyke. American Poet

Thanksgiving really is about traditions...

Family Praying Before Dinner
Traditional Thanksgiving Day Dinner
If you think back to Thanksgiving Day in your own family, you might recall such things as the favorite item on the menu, or waiting for your grandparents to arrive, or tossing a football or Frisbee with your cousins...or maybe your Thanksgiving day memories were just a quiet day spent with your immediate family. The truth is we all have our own private memories of this holiday. We see how it is portrayed in movies, television shows, advertisements...you can even read all about the roots of Thanksgiving Day. Chances are you will find it an interesting read. We know one family where the two adult sons take an extended bike ride. They get up early in the morning, go riding and arrive home just in time to celebrate the holiday with the rest of the family. Of course, they are teased about how they are avoiding helping with the dinner preparations, but again it is their tradition.

PACE Recovery Center continues a new tradition

You might remember last year when we shared with you that the PACE men would be volunteering their time on Thanksgiving Day to participate in the local Gobble Gobble Give Thanksgiving Charity Event to feed the homeless. A tradition was born, and this year the tradition will continue. Again this year, we will be volunteering at the Santa Ana, California Gobble Gobble Give event.  If you happen to live in the Orange County, California, area and are interested in participating, then you can visit their FACEBOOK page.

Recovery includes starting new traditions...

Couple Working in Homeless Shelter
Volunteering on Thanksgiving Day!
Our motto is Positive Attitude Changes Everything! As we've said before, we know that as the clients at our addiction recovery center help provide hope to others it will help them realize the positive changes they are making in their own lives. We wish you all a beautiful, safe, healthy and peaceful Thanksgiving.  

PACE Clients To Participate In Gobble Gobble Give Event This Thanksgiving

service in addiction recovery
One of the key components of the recovery is the concept of selfless service. At PACE Recovery Center we believe it is vitally important to help our clients to learn about the value of having a positive impact on their community. We have found that service work helps our clients to gain a sense of self-pride and this in turn allows for an opportunity to enrich the lives of others. This Thanksgiving PACE clients are participating in the Gobble Gobble Give Thanksgiving Charity Event to feed the homeless. This event helps to feed 600 homeless individuals and provides basic living necessities such as shoes, sweaters, beanies, and tooth brush kits. We know that as the clients at our addiction recovery center help provide hope to others it will help them realize the positive changes they are making in their own lives. Wishing you all a beautiful and peaceful Thanksgiving.