Young People In Addiction Recovery

addiction recoveryThere is no question about it, the picture of addiction recovery in America is rapidly changing. Historically, when the general public thought about those who are seeking or found recovery, pictures of people who had hit rock bottom would come to mind. They would conjure up images of bottom of the barrel drunks living on skid row, or addicts doing anything in their power to acquire their next fix. However, the true picture of an addict or alcoholic can be hard to define as science shows us that addiction can touch people from every corner of life and social-economic status has little bearing. What’s more, one’s age, race or gender isn’t indicative of who meets the criteria of addiction. In the past, the rooms of 12-Step recovery meetings were epitomized by older adults, sharing their stories while the aroma of stale coffee and cigarettes permeated the air. While the majority of people working a program of recovery are indeed beyond the years of young adulthood, addiction recovery is a young person’s program as well. It is not uncommon for one’s abuse of drugs or alcohol to morph into a serious problem in adolescence. Many teenagers and young adults seek help at treatment facilities every day. If you are in recovery yourself, it is somewhat likely that you have met someone who began the journey when they were around the age of 15—managing to acquire over a decade and counting of long term recovery time.

Young Adults In Recovery

All across the United States and in other countries as well, recovery meetings for young people are held every day. A collective effort is afoot, where young people (like their elder peers) practice the principles of recovery in all their affairs—helping each other stay clean and sober—one day at a time. It’s strongly encouraged that younger people create relationships with one another, as it is likely that you will have much more in common with people in the same age group. While there is a lot that young people in recovery can learn from “old timers,” and you would be wise to listen to what they have to share, in the timeless goal of searching for the similarities rather than the differences, connecting with young adults working a program is paramount. If you are a young adult whose life has become unmanageable due to drugs and alcohol, you may want to consider a treatment center that is designed for your demographic. On top of learning and acquiring the tools necessary for achieving continuous long term sobriety, you will create bonds with other young people who have walked a similar path as you. Such bonds can last decades. You will also be introduced to young people's meetings, events and conventions that are geared towards creating networks with other young people in recovery.

Young People In Recovery

If you find yourself reading this article and you happen to be a young person working a program, we encourage you to keep reading. It is no secret that the gift of recovery can only be held onto if it is given away freely. Paying it forward. If you have worked the 12-Steps and are sponsoring others, then you know that to be a reality. Only by helping others can we continue to help ourselves. Or perhaps you are reading this and are thinking that you need to step up your service to others. If so, you may want to look into “Young People In Recovery” (YPR), as it may help you stay on the path of abstinence and spiritual betterment. The mission of YPR is as follows:
Our national leadership team creates and cultivates local community-led chapters through grassroots organizing and training. Chapters support young people in or seeking recovery by empowering them to obtain stable employment, secure suitable housing, and continue and complete their educations. Chapters also advocate on the local and state levels for better accessibility of these services and other effective recovery resources.”
If you would like to locate a chapter or start one in your local area, please click here. Please take a moment to watch a short video below: If you are having trouble watch the video, please click here.

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