Tag Archives: community

Recovery Communities Help People Succeed

recovery

On the road to long-term recovery, finding a community is essential. Most men and women who’ve had struggles with drug and alcohol and tried to get sober without assistance encounter problems. The modes of being that people utilized in active addiction – selfishness, self-centeredness, and isolation – are not the same that a person relies on for lasting recovery.

Individuals looking to make drastic changes for the better must embrace an entirely new mode of living. A paradigm shift in thinking about one’s self and others is required to make personal improvements stick. The old ways of living life will not suffice in the realm of addiction recovery.

Healing from alcohol and substance use disorder is a lengthy process. Time is a necessary ingredient; learning how to maintain a positive attitude in the face of stress doesn’t happen overnight.

Finding the courage to trust others isn’t easy; addiction makes it hard for people to look at others’ motives without suspicion. However, trust one must, if a man or woman is to make progress. The longer a person works a program, the less work it is to believe that peers have your best interest at heart when they make suggestions.

With each passing day, relative newcomers feel less and less alone. A sense of togetherness wells up inside individuals, providing them with the strength to keep moving forward.

Millions of people realize the gifts of recovery by working with others to achieve similar goals. Having a support network to rely on is the most vigorous defense against relapse. Abstaining from drugs and alcohol for a day or two is possible without help, but doing it for months or years requires outside help.

Community is Everything in Recovery

Many of those new to recovery, either in treatment or 12 Step meetings, are reticent about opening up. Finding a voice, and the courage to use it, can seem impossible to some. However, those unable to express their feelings initially learn to do so so by watching others do the same.

Hearing others share their daily struggles – such as the desire to use again – is empowering. It’s an acknowledgment that the disease is always trying to re-exert itself, and that talking about it diminishes its power. Sitting amongst like-minded individuals who all share similar challenges, collectively saying to their disease ‘not today,’ is a remarkable experience.

Recovering alcoholics and addicts draw strength from their community. Such people find solutions to everyday trials and tribulations by talking about them with a sponsor or trusted confidant. When a young man works the Steps with another man, their eyes become open to a world of possibilities.

Real friends are made through working a program of recovery. The very people who serve as a person’s guide toward a better life often become their most essential companions.

The connections made between men and women in “the rooms” are selfless, genuine, and enriching. Friendships made in sobriety feel meaningful because they are bound by honesty, open-mindedness, and willingness.

The recovery community gives people the freedom to be themselves, to no longer mask who they really are and feel accepted. Drugs and alcohol erode men and women’s authenticity; recovery builds it back up. Again, it is a process that requires more than abstinence alone. The Steps are a formula for more than sobriety; they are a recipe for being a whole person.

12 Step Recovery 84th Anniversary

In 2019, countless people around the globe owe some part of their ability to heal from addiction to a 12 Step recovery program. For those who embrace the principles of Alcoholics Anonymous, you probably know that Founders Day Weekend was just celebrated across the country.

It has been 84 years since Bill Wilson had a conversation with another alcoholic, Bob Smith, about a solution. Each year, recovering alcoholics and addicts acknowledge the importance of that meeting and the program that followed.

What started as two alcoholics working together to never drink again no matter what is now a community of millions of people. Bill W. and Dr. Bob’s fortuitous friendship led to an untold number of connections of a similar nature.

Gender-Specific Addiction and Mental Health Treatment

At PACE Recovery Center, we help adult men get to the root of their behavioral and mental health issues. Men work together and form lasting bonds with each other; in doing so, they learn the importance of community.

We offer several programs to address the unique needs of each client adequately. Please contact us today to learn more about our services and to begin creating a plan for finding long-term recovery.

Giving Back in Recovery and Community

giving back

The principles and virtues of addiction recovery are what the program is built upon. Honesty, willingness and service, for example, are essential to recovery; without these the goal of long term sobriety could not be achieved. Adhering to the principles, like those mentioned above, are not only good for recovery, it is a good way for anyone to live. But for those with a history of addiction, a disease that is often typified by extreme selfishness, practicing the principles of recovery in all of one’s affairs can be difficult at first. For many recovering addicts and alcoholics, being honest with others is 180 degrees different than how one has been historically.

Overtime, adopting the principles of recovery and practicing these in all of one’s affairs becomes easier, and eventually acting counter to that way of living becomes more and more difficult. An individual comes to the program wanting to find a new lease on life. You surrender and commit yourself to the vital task of being not only honest with yourself, but with your peers. You commit to working a program as if life depended on it (and it does), not only working the steps, but living them. In time, if direction has been followed to the best of one’s ability per working the steps, you will accumulate a length of sobriety. Then what? The simple answer is that you make a commitment to pay it forward.

If You Want to Keep It, Give It Back

Giving back to the program which was given to you gratis, is a major component of recovery. Even if you have only attended a few meetings, there is a good chance you have heard it said that you can’t keep it unless you give it away. You may have scratched your head upon hearing that, saying to yourself, ‘I can’t keep it, unless I am willing to give it back.’ A paradox, right? Well, not exactly. As you work through the steps with a sponsor, you will come to realize that this person who you barely know is helping you save your own life. Something you were unable to do on your own. On the surface, it will appear that said person is in no way being compensated for teaching you how to work the program, and live life one day at a time.

At some point along the way you will come to understand that this relative stranger helping you, was once helped in the same way by another person. And is still likely being helped by a sponsor of their own. In effect, helping another find the gifts of recovery, in turn, helps them keep what you have earned from recovery. Such work does not only apply to sponsorship, it could be as simple or as menial as cleaning up after a meeting (even the bathroom) or making coffee for the group. Humility goes a long way, when it comes to long-term sobriety. Walking up to a newcomer and welcoming them to the group is a way of paying it forward.

The Recovery Community and Beyond

Practicing the principles of recovery in all our affairs doesn’t just apply to how we conduct ourselves in the rooms of recovery and among our peers working a program. Sure, after acquiring some time in the program your role with the support community is of the utmost importance. But you, or rather all of us, are members of a greater community—society. The good work you do in the program can also be channeled into the greater community. What’s more, as your time in sobriety accumulates and you begin to feel sturdier in recovery, you may find yourself desiring to become a productive member of society. Feeling inclined to do things like volunteer your services to good cause.

There is no shortage of ways you can be of service to the greater community. You may discover that you own life experience, even the bad parts, could be of great help to at-risk youth. Organizations and campaigns dedicated to mitigating the risk of certain young people walking down a similar path—that of addiction.

PACE Recovery Center Encourages Community Service

Throughout the year, PACE Recovery Center encourages the men in our treatment program to become involved with community events. This can include volunteering at charitable events, particularly working with the homeless during the holidays.

This year PACE Recovery Center has committed to supporting the Tucson Conquistadores Classic - An Official PGA TOUR Champions event. The event is sponsored by the Tucson Conquistadores, a civic, not-for-profit fundraising organization established in 1962. Over the decades, the Conquistadores have contributed more than $32 million to youth athletic programs throughout Southern Arizona.

The Tucson Conquistadores Classic begins March 15 and continues through March 19, 2017. It takes place at Omni Tucson National Golf Resort. And should you happen to be Tucson, AZ, this week, you may want to get involved.

It Is All About Giving Back…

Giving back is at the heart of the Tucson Conquistadores and Champions Tour. Net proceeds from this tournament go directly to youth charities in Southern Arizona including The First Tee of Tucson, Boys and Girls Clubs, YMCA, Pima County Special Olympics and the Southern Arizona Community Sports Center at Curtis Park.

Here’s to a successful tournament and paying it forward.

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