Tag Archives: long-term recovery

Early Recovery: Perseverance and Patience Matter

early recovery

Perseverance and patience are vital components of recovery; those who stay the course have limitless potential. Those who’ve succeeded in achieving long-term recovery understand the above, and they pass the wisdom along to the newcomer.

If you are new to recovery, it’s vital that you not give up before the miracle happens. There will be obstacles along the way, but they can be overcome. Working a program gives you the tools to push through barriers. What’s more, you do not have to work through each problem independently; lasting recovery is achieved by working together.

Perhaps you are facing complications in your life today? Many people in early recovery have to contend with wreckage from their past. Some face legal challenges, others have broken marriages, or they are estranged from their families. No matter the challenge, recovery is a pathway toward reconciliation and reparation.

Early recovery can feel daunting at times; many throw in the towel before they have a chance to see the fruits of their labor. Please do not let your past dictate how your future will turn out. Be patient, and you will see what working a program can do for you.

Patience and perseverance have a magical effect before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish. —John Quincy Adams

Setting Goals In Early Recovery

With the end of the year in sight, now might be an excellent time to start thinking about what you would like to accomplish in the coming year. Talk to your sponsor or trusted peers in the program about what you would like to see come to fruition in the 365 days to come. It’s critical to set realistic goals and formulate a plan for achievement.

It’s salient to remember that recovery must come first if you would like to see your goals come to fruition. Keep in mind that your program must be an integral component of any plan. Letting up on your recovery will be detrimental to any goals you set for yourself.

Setting goals in early recovery is beneficial; they give you something to work towards each day. Keep in mind how important it is to set recovery-related goals. You may not be in a position to set long-term goals yet; however, you are always in a position to think about milestones you’d like to achieve in recovery.

When you have 30 days clean and sober, you might start thinking about achieving 60 or 90 days without taking a drink or drug. In many ways, recovery milestones are just as important as going back to school or repairing relationships marred by addiction. That is because neither of those mentioned above will work out without a strong recovery.

When you are too focused on your life goals, there is a chance you will let up on working a program. If that happens, you open the door for addiction to reassert itself in your life. A failure to put your recovery first can result in a relapse, which inhibits you from achieving other goals you have set in your life. Recovery first, always!

Our goals can only be reached through a vehicle of a plan, in which we must fervently believe, and upon which we must vigorously act. There is no other route to success.” — Pablo Picasso

Prevailing in Recovery

Early recovery is a challenging time for anyone. Sacrifices have to be made in order to persevere. There will be times when you feel the urge to give up—moments when you think the task is too difficult. Again, please do not give up before the miracle happens.

Another critical component of succeeding in recovery is being compassionate toward others and also toward yourself. Mistakes will be made along the way, but mishaps are a part of life. Remember that learning how to live and become the best version of yourself without drugs and alcohol is a learning process.

Prevailing in recovery means not beating yourself up when things do not go as planned. You may not achieve your goal on the first attempt, but that doesn’t mean it’s forever out of reach. Setting and achieving goals for recovery and day-to-day life requires endurance. If things do not work out at first, then learn from your errors rather than giving up. You will likely try harder the next time or do things differently. Don’t give up!

I believe that man will not merely endure: he will prevail. He is immortal, not because he alone among creatures has an inexhaustible voice, but because he has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance.” — William Faulkner

Gender-Specific Addiction Treatment in California

If you are struggling with addiction and are ready to take steps toward recovery, please contact PACE Recovery Center. Our Gender-Specific Addiction Treatment in California helps men begin the journey of recovery. You are invited to reach out to us at any time to learn more about our programs and services.

Recovery Repetitions and Helpful Mantras

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Addiction recovery, among many other things, is about repetition. Long-term sobriety depends on a person’s ability to adopt a new mode of living. Discarding old behaviors and negative mindsets while creating different traditions that don’t involve the use of alcohol or drugs is critical.

Following and sticking to a healthy path takes an enormous effort in early recovery. Keeping temptations and cravings at bay is just one of several obstacles the newly sober face. At times, it can seem like there’s something around every corner lying in wait to derail one’s progress. Which is why developing structured patterns of living that mitigate the risk of making wrong turns is invaluable.

When people finally accept that they have a disease that needs tending each day, they do whatever it takes to nurture their recovery. The first year is about following a blueprint for success that was drafted by countless men and women. The hard mistakes made by generations before gave us a formula for making continued progress. Those who trust the process and stick to the program find no ceiling to what’s achievable.

Over time, one’s new approach won’t seem novel at all. Adhering to and prioritizing the needs of one’s program becomes natural. Men and women will no longer wonder if they will make a meeting or call their sponsor each day. Reaching out a hand to the newcomer will be second nature and being of service wherever and whenever becomes standard operating procedure.

Promoting a Positive Mindset in Recovery

Again, the road to long-term recovery is repetitious. Engaging in the same or similar daily activities, so they become a reflex is vital, but arriving at that point isn’t without difficulty.

At times, calling one’s sponsor will seem like a quotidian struggle. In the first year of recovery, it is common to get burnt out from attending meetings, day in and day out. Sharing in meetings will feel like an impossible task some days. Hearing other people share, ever listening for the similarities and not the differences, can be exhausting.

While it’s not unhealthy to feel frustrated with the program’s redundancies, rebelling against such feelings is paramount. Frustration will foment spiritual unrest and negative thoughts if left unchecked. Interestingly, one of the most repetitive aspects of the program is also a tool for combating annoyance. For example, recovery sayings, maxims, and mantras, such as Keep It Simple, Stupid (KISS).

In meetings of the 12 Step variety like Alcoholics Anonymous, acronyms and repeated quotations abound. Some can be found in the Big Book or other 12 Step-related texts, while others arose organically in the group and were then passed along from one member to the next. Have an attitude of gratitude, turn I wish into I will, and progress, not perfection are prime examples.

The newly sober will hear the above sayings innumerable times just in the first year alone, borderline ad nauseum. Platitudes and maxims might seem annoying at first, but when repeated to one’s self in times of difficulty, they can pull a person out of a funk.

Utilizing the Mantras of Recovery

If you become disinterested in being of service, even though you know it’s beneficial, then try focusing on being more self-aware. Combat your disquiet with subtle reminders like:

  • The healthy person finds happiness in helping others.
  • Humility is not thinking less of yourself, but thinking of yourself less.
  • If you want what you’ve never had, you must do what you’ve never done.

You have probably heard the above lines before and have incorporated at least one into your quiver of recovery sayings. If not, write them down and memorize them; they are helpful to have in your back pocket when feeling unmotivated.

Perhaps you have found yourself bothered by another member of the group and no longer wish to see him or her? While you do not have to like or relate to everyone, your distaste for someone hurts you the most.

Address the problem by talking to your sponsor, rather than deciding to no longer attend a meeting; they may be a member of your homegroup, after all. Discussions will lead you to discover the problem’s root; in these scenarios, people usually find that the issue is internal, not external. Your sponsor may drop another helpful saying on you, albeit with a touch of levity perhaps. He or she may say, “If you like everyone in AA, you’re not going to enough meetings!”

Bothers with the program are typically menial. However, not facing perturbations can disrupt progress. If you put minuscule problems before your sobriety, it will not last. People who no longer put their recovery first are bound to slip, which brings us to our last helpful acronym. SLIP: Sobriety Losing Its Priority!

Gender-Specific Addiction Treatment

At PACE (Positive Attitudes Change Everything) Recovery Center, we equip adult men with the tools to adhere to a program of recovery. Our safe and supportive environment is the ideal setting to restructure and gear your life toward achieving long-term sobriety. Please contact us today to learn more about our gender-specific addiction treatment center.

Addiction Treatment: Asking for Help

addiction

When someone is battling active addiction, long-term recovery can seem like an impossible task. Many people living with alcohol and substance use disorders resign themselves to the belief that there is no hope. It’s easy to come to that determination, especially if one is in a state of despair.

A person’s belief that all hope may be lost is reaffirmed by each successive, unsuccessful attempt at getting clean and sober. Addicts and alcoholics are predisposed to self-defeating mindsets, so it is easy to see why some might think they are destined to succumb to their disorder. A relapse in early recovery is the fuel on the fire of doubt. At a certain point, one starts to wonder, ‘why even bother trying to heal?’

Negativity also is pervasive among individuals who struggle with alcohol and substance use disorders. This is especially true when a person is contending with a co-occurring mental illness like depression; more than half of people living with addiction meets the criteria for a dual diagnosis.

More often than not, addicts and alcoholics first attempt to get clean and sober on their own. It is natural to think that such problems can be managed without assistance. Some will try to moderate or taper off consumption, while others will decide to go for recovery cold turkey. Neither scenarios result in successful outcomes, typically.

Even when outside assistance is within reach, many will opt to avoid seeking help. The desire to make a stab at recovery alone partly stems from the stigma of addiction and the accompanying shame that is its byproduct. Nobody wants to concede to others that they have a problem.

The Inspiration to Seek Help for Addiction and Recover

Asking for help is the most effective approach to addressing addiction and co-occurring mental health disorders. When a person concedes that they have an illness that requires seeking professional assistance to heal from, then they are ready to surrender. Some will make this decision in their early twenties, whereas others will hold out longer and choose to get help after several decades of active use.

In every individual case, there is an impetus that leads a person to ask for help. Sometimes it’s an intervention; friends and family often come together to encourage their loved one to seek support. Many people find their way into treatment through the criminal justice system, which is another form of intervention. Sir Elton John found the courage to seek treatment in the wake of Ryan White’s funeral (a hemophiliac who contracted HIV from a blood transfusion).

In 2008, Elton told Larry King that his life was spiraling out of control around that time, the result of 16 years of addiction. At the apex of his unhappiness and poor health, he finally decided to go to rehab. In 1990, he checked into a hospital in Chicago, which, at the time, was one of the only places in North America that would accept patients with drug, alcohol, and food addiction.

“And as soon as I got my courage to say I need help, I went to a facility in Chicago, which was excellent – it was a hospital,” said John. He added that it, “was the best thing I ever did…”

Elton John continues to work a program of recovery. He also helps other men take steps toward living a clean and sober life. This week, Sir Elton John celebrated 29 years of addiction recovery, he posted about it on social media:

29 years ago today, I was a broken man. I finally summoned up the courage to say 3 words that would change my life: “I need help.” Thank you to all the selfless people who have helped me on my journey through sobriety. I am eternally grateful. — Elton xo

California Addiction Treatment for Men

If you have followed the news of the pop icon’s sobriety over the years, then you know that he pays his recovery forward. He has worked with other celebrities who had a hard time with drugs and alcohol, such as Eminem. His willingness to share with the world about his addiction and long-term recovery is a tremendous source of inspiration for those who think that sobriety isn’t possible.

Please contact PACE Recovery Center if you need help with and alcohol or substance use disorder. Our evidence-based rehab center for men also specializes in mental health treatment as well. Feel free to reach out to our team at any time of the day to discuss your options and begin the life-changing journey of recovery.

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