Tag Archives: NAMI

Mental Illness Alerts on HBO and the “It’s OK” Campaign

mental illness

Talking about mental health is paramount; we need to have discussions about mental illness to combat stigma and encourage people to seek treatment. Historically, Americans have shied away from conversing about mental health disorders, sweeping them under the rug in hopes they will disappear. However, with one in five American adults facing the realities of mental and behavioral health problems, we can no longer ignore this public health crisis.

Right now, millions of Americans are suffering in silence from mental illnesses; such individuals feel isolated and alone in their struggles. Many have trouble relating to their peers at school and at work. When individuals feel apart from society, they are more likely to engage in self-defeating and self-harming behaviors.

Connection is the key to keeping mental illness at bay; those who feel disconnected will often use drugs and alcohol to escape their feelings. The practice can lead to dependence and addiction, and self-medication puts people at risk of overdose. Conversely, when individuals feel like they have support and compassion, they can find the courage to take action and seek treatment.

Several recent national observances have highlighted the need for having conversations about mental and behavioral health disorders. As we pointed out last week, October is National Depression Education & Awareness Month. Campaigns to raise awareness about mental health get more people talking about the benefits of compassion and how it gives people the strength to seek help.

Advocating for mental health in the 21st Century goes beyond annual awareness campaigns. A number of companies are doing their part to open up discussions about mental illness. Television and streaming networks are among those who hope to encourage people to seek treatment and recovery.

HBO Tackles Mental Illness Stigma

The premium network HBO has a history of creating programs that deal with sensitive subjects. Several HBO documentary series have helped raise awareness about addiction and treatment in America.

HBO Shows like In Treatment and, more recently, Euphoria are two examples of series that deal with mental illness and addiction. The hit show Girls touched on mental health disorders as well; the main character Hannah struggled with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Tony Soprano of The Sopranos battled anxiety and panic attacks. The network understands the importance of featuring characters in their shows who face the same problems as millions of Americans.

HBO has a new initiative to get more people talking about mental illness and encourage struggling men and women to reach out for support, The New York Times reports. The “It’s OK” campaign will involve beginning certain shows – that deal with mental health – with an alert that points out the challenges a character is facing.

The campaign will not only apply to new shows; the alerts will be applied retroactively to older shows like The Sopranos, according to the article. The alerts will conclude with imploring viewers who require assistance to reach out to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI).

We are not saying ‘viewer discretion is advised,’” Jason Mulderig, HBO’s Vice President of Brand and Product Marketing, said in a statement. “We are saying ‘viewer conversation is encouraged.’”

In conjunction with “It’s OK,” the network is releasing a series of videos called “Doctor Commentaries.” The short videos feature Dr. Ali Mattu, a clinical psychologist, unpacking specific show scenes that deal with mental health disorders. The first episode is available; Dr. Mattu examines OCD in the show Girls. Please take a moment to watch below (please be advised, there is some adult content):


If you are having trouble watching, please click here.

California Addiction and Mental Health Treatment Center

It’s a promising sign that HBO is committed to the awareness and destigmatization of mental health issues. Other streaming services like Netflix added disclaimers to their programs that deal with mental illness and suicide. Providing resources before and after shows that focus on mental illness can encourage men and women to seek assistance.

Please contact PACE Recovery Center if you are an adult male who is struggling with behavioral or mental health disorders. Our gender-specific treatment center can help you begin the healing process and teach you how to lead a healthy and fulfilling life in recovery. If you meet the criteria for mental illness and a co-occurring substance use disorder, we offer a dual diagnosis program that treats both conditions simultaneously.

Suicide Prevention Awareness Month 2019: You’re Not Alone

suicide prevention awareness month1

Even though suicidal ideations are treatable, and suicide is preventable, suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. Men and women take their lives for several reasons, but mental illness is a factor more times than not. During National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, it’s vital to talk about mental health and how seeking help saves lives.

The fact that Suicide Prevention Awareness Month coincides with National Recovery Month is beneficial. Addiction is a form of mental illness that often plays a role in people’s decision to end their lives. Mental health is beneficial to overall health, and encouraging people affected by mental health conditions to get the care they need is paramount.

When individuals receive evidence-based treatment, they can lead healthy and productive lives. Such people need to be made to understand that they are not alone and that others have been in their shoes. They require compassion and understanding from their communities, not stigma and shame.

Organizations like the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) work tirelessly to encourage society to care more about people with mental illness. NAMI aims to shatter the stigmas and myths that present barriers to treatment and recovery. During Suicide Prevention Month, we can all make a positive impact on those affected by mental health conditions. Your kindness, compassion, and participation are instrumental in inspiring people to reach out for support.

WhyCare? About Mental Health

One in five adults in America experiences a mental health condition in a given year, according to NAMI. One in 25 adults deals with a severe mental illness in a given year. Those who are unwilling or unable to access adequate support are at significant risk of developing unhealthy coping mechanisms. It’s not a coincidence that co-occurring substance use disorders often accompany mental illnesses like depression.

Using drugs and alcohol is just one of the harmful ways that men and women cope with mental diseases. Many will resort to self-harm to deal with their symptoms, which can progress to suicidal thoughts and actions over time. NAMI reports that 46 percent of those who die by suicide have a diagnosed mental illness. What’s more, psychological autopsies reveal that up to 90 percent of people who die by suicide have an underlying mental illness.

Sadly, too many men and women are reluctant to seek assistance for their mental illnesses or tell people about their negative thoughts. Too often, they feel cut off from society and alone; stigmas force people to keep their issues secret from their peers. Nothing good ever arises from suffering in silence. We have an obligation to combat stigmas, open up dialogues, and support those who are struggling.

NAMI’s Suicide Prevention Awareness Month WhyCare? campaign asks everyone to show that we care about people living with mental illness. The organization would like your help in disseminating stories of hope, awareness messaging, and infographics on social media. The campaign writes:

Care has the power to make a life-changing impact on those affected by mental health conditions. Through our own words and actions, we can shift the social and systemic barriers that prevent people from building better lives.

Suicide Prevention Awareness Month: You Are Not Alone

If you are in recovery from mental illness or are a suicide survivor, NAMI has created two safe, moderated spaces for sharing stories and creative expression. You Are Not Alone and OK2Talk are vehicles for men and women to inspire others with similar experiences.

Your encouragement and support let people who need help know that they are not alone. You are welcome to share your experience anonymously via several mediums, including poetry, song lyrics, inspirational quotes, drawings, photos, and videos.

You have an authentic voice. You can make a difference for yourself and others by sharing your experiences and perspectives. What has helped? What hasn’t? What has been most discouraging about your condition? What has given you hope? There are all sorts of things you know that other people want to know—you are not alone. Let them know that they aren’t either.

Orange County Mental Health Program for Men

At PACE Recovery Center, we help adult men recover from mental health disorders. Please contact us today if you or someone you care about is struggling with mental illness. Our highly credentialed clinical staff assists clients in identifying specific recovery goals and achieve their goals while preparing for productive, independent living.

If you or someone you know is in crisis, call The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK (8255) or text NAMI to 741741 or call 911 immediately.

Stigma Curing During Mental Illness Awareness Week

stigma

While May is Mental Health Awareness Month, October 7–13 is Mental Illness Awareness Week or MIAW 2018. Naturally, there is some overlap between these two essential observances—namely—ending the stigma of psychological disorders like addiction and depression.

We cover stigma on this blog frequently due to our understanding that there exist forces preventing Americans from seeking treatment. More people need to see the person, not the illness. Nearly 60% of adults with a mental illness didn’t receive mental health services in the previous year. Given that individuals living with untreated mental health conditions are at significant risk of self-harm and suicide, collective action is needed immediately.

The National Alliance On Mental Illness or NAMI chose Cure Stigma as its theme this year for Mental Health Month and MIAW 2018. The organization would like it to be known that: together we can encourage more people to seek treatment. NAMI’s campaign manifesto reads as follows:

There’s a virus spreading across America. It harms the 1 in 5 Americans affected by mental health conditions. It shames them into silence. It prevents them from seeking help. And in some cases, it takes lives. What virus are we talking about? It’s stigma. Stigma against people with mental health conditions. But there’s good news. Stigma is 100% curable. Compassion, empathy and understanding are the antidote. Your voice can spread the cure. Join NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness. Together we can #CureStigma.

Mental Health Facts

Most Americans are more than likely unaware of just how pervasive mental illness is around the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that over 300 million people are living with depression. What’s more, the vast majority of the afflicted have never undergone therapy, counseling, or treatment.

The truth is that too many people have little understanding of mental disease; lack of knowledge – ignorance – is a contributing factor in persons lacking empathy and compassion. If a more significant number of Americans could appreciate that mental illness affects 1 in 5 adults in the United States, maybe they’d exhibit greater understanding. With that in mind, let’s take a look some of the more recent figures to bring depression, bipolar disorder, and addiction in to focus.

Here are the facts:

  • 60 million people in the United States are living with a mental illness.
  • Among the 20.2 million adults in America who experienced a substance use disorder, 50.5%—10.2 million adults—had a co-occurring mental illness.
  • Depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide.
  • Approximately 1 in 25 adults in the U.S. experiences a severe mental illness in a given year.
  • 90% of those who die by suicide have an underlying mental illness.

Armed with such information, anyone can see that we have a real crisis on our hands when it comes to mental disease. This week provides an opportunity to take to social media and spread the message that stigma hurts us all; that empathy and compassion save lives; and, that together we can affect real change.

Fighting Stigma On World Mental Health Day

Today is World Mental Health Day, October 10, 2018! The focus this year is Young People and Mental Health In A Changing World.

mental health

The World Health Organization writes:

Investment by governments and the involvement of the social, health and education sectors in comprehensive, integrated, evidence-based programmes for the mental health of young people is essential. This investment should be linked to programmes to raise awareness among adolescents and young adults of ways to look after their mental health and to help peers, parents and teachers know how to support their friends, children and students. This is the focus for this year’s World Mental Health Day.

In recognition of MIAW and World Mental Health Day, we hope that more people will open their hearts to friends and family members affected by mental illness. Mental health disorders are not going anywhere, but we can make stigma disappear. As a result, millions of people will find the courage to seek help and go on to lead fulfilling and productive lives.

Co-Occurring Disorder Treatment

We mentioned above that more than ten million Americans are living with addiction and a co-occurring mental health disorder. It is paramount that such individuals receive treatment for their use disorder and dual diagnosis concurrently for successful outcomes. If you are a young adult male whose life is unmanageable due to mental illness, please contact PACE Recovery Center to learn more about our program. Parents of young men are also welcome to reach out to our team to learn how we can help your child break the cycle of addiction and heal from mental illness.

During World Mental Health Day and Mental Illness Awareness Week, PACE is spreading the message that the stigma virus is 100% curable; and, the antidote is compassion, empathy, and understanding.

Mental Health Awareness Month 2018 Cure Stigma Quiz

mental health

May is Mental Health Month; a time to raise awareness, fight stigma, provide support, educate the public. At PACE Recovery Center, our primary focus is treating addiction and coöccurring mental health disorders; we have made a commitment to do all that we can to end stigma and encourage individuals to seek help. Over the course the month we will cover a number of topics regarding mental illness, addiction, and stigma with the hope of helping those still struggling to understand they are not alone. We know your suffering and grasp the difficulty of reaching out for help.

Only 41% of adults in the U.S. with a mental health condition received mental health services in the past year, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Among adults with a serious mental illness, 62.9% received mental health services in the past year. It is worth noting that more than half (10.2 million) of people living with a substance use disorder also have a co-occurring mental illness. What’s more, recovery is dependent upon treating both disorders simultaneously; there is no way around it, ignoring one condition will compromise the efforts made in treating the other.

One of the most significant obstacles standing in the way of treatment is stigma; in fact, stigma prevents the 1 in 5 Americans with mental health conditions from seeking help, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). When the general public doesn’t have all the facts, as is the case with brain diseases, people base their opinions on what it “seems" is going on with an individual. Large swaths of society believe that those suffering can choose to look at things differently; as if they can just walk-off their mental illness like a skinned knee and get back into the game of life.

Together, We Can #CureStigma

In reality, mental illness is not a choice! When people come to conclusions without the facts, it has a parasitic effect and creates an environment of shame, fear, and silence. When individuals don’t seek help because they worry about what other people think, it is a detriment to all. The overall wellbeing of society, like the links of chain, is only as healthy as it’s sickest citizens. When those suffering can’t access help, everyone pays the price in some way. It is worth remembering that there is not a single person on the planet who doesn’t know or care for someone with a mental illness; rarely is a family spared of the consequences of mental health conditions. 1 in 5 adults in the United States lives with a mental illness.

Even when there are mental health problems in the family, it is not uncommon for some members to view the afflicted negatively. What ends up happening is that the person suffering convinces his or her self that their illness is a byproduct of doing something wrong. As a result, such people shroud their behaviors in secrecy and are less likely to seek help for fear of judgment and ridicule. We cannot stress enough the importance of resisting the temptation to act in such ways in response to the ill-conceived notions of others; on the other hand, it is vital that everyone take some time and evaluate their views about mental illness.

Mental Health Month CureStigma Quiz

Examining your behaviors toward people living with mental illness and making adjustments (if necessary) can go a long way; doing your part to avoid contributing to the stigma of mental health disorders can save lives. NAMI believes that stigma towards mental illness is 100 percent curable, and there is a simple way to determine if stigma has infected you, take the CureStigma Quiz.

Please take a moment to watch a short PSA:


If you are having trouble watching, please click here.

Co-Occurring Disorder Treatment

If you are a young man struggling with addiction and a coöccurring mental health disorder, PACE Recovery Center can help. Our team of dual diagnosis experts can teach you the skills and provide you the necessary tools for leading a productive life in recovery. Please contact us today to learn more about our program.

Replace the Stigma of Mental Illness With Hope

mental-illnessWith our nation’s eyes fixed on the television screen and other major media outlets following the primaries, there are a number of other important events happening that are being overlooked—such as Mental Health Month (MHM). Last month, events were held across the country to raise awareness about alcohol, with the goal of educating Americans about how alcohol can impact one’s life which would hopefully prevent people from traveling down a dangerous path towards alcoholism. In May, everyone is being called upon to do their part in ending the stigma of mental illness and advocate for equal care. Mental health disorder is an umbrella term that covers a number of different conditions, including addiction. The disease is recognized in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V). There are 20.2 million adults in America who have experienced a substance use disorder, a staggering number which begs everyone’s attention, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). On top of that, more than half (50.5 percent or 10.2 million adults) had a co-occurring disorder; this is when someone living with addiction also suffers from another form of mental illness, such as: anxiety, bipolar disorder, depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. Mental health awareness is an extremely important topic, especially when you consider that the majority of people living with any form of mental illness do not receive mental health services. In the past year, only 41 percent of people with a mental health condition were able to get assistance, NAMI reports. Mental illness is unlike a number of other health issues, brain diseases currently do not have a cure, which means it is paramount for not only the patient, but society that those who are afflicted get the help they so desperately need. Expanding access to mental health services will only come to fruition if we, as a nation, work together to break the stigma that has for too long accompanied treatable conditions. We all have a vested interest in bringing mental illness out of the darkness, practically every American is close to someone who battles with a mental health issue 365-days a year. Every year, 43.8 million adults in America experience mental illness, approximately 1 in 5. May is Mental Health Month (MHM), and there are a number of things you can do to help break the stigma of mental illness. NAMI is asking people to harness the power of social media platforms to share mental health related information, images and graphics with #StigmaFree or #MentalHealthMonth. You can also take your efforts one step forward by taking a pledge to be ‪#‎StigmaFree‬. It’s quick, easy and could reach the millions of people who are too afraid to seek help due to societal shame. Just follow the steps below:
  1. Take the pledge.
  2. Record your video.
  3. Upload to your YouTube channel and other social media accounts.
  4. Be sure to include #StigmaFree in the title of your video.
If you’d like, take a moment to watch The Big Bang Theory’s Mayim Bialik take the pledge to be #StigmaFree: If you can’t see the video, please click here.

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