Tag Archives: Suicide Prevention Awareness Month

Recovery and Suicide Prevention Awareness Month

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At PACE Recovery Center, we are hopeful that you had a peaceful Labor Day weekend. We understand that many Americans in recovery are still out of work—furloughed or on permanent leave. As such, these are stressful times for a large percentage of the population. We also hope that you continue taking steps to safeguard your mental health and protect your progress.

We shared some alarming data regarding the dramatic increase in the number of Americans experiencing one or more adverse mental or behavioral health conditions. Being Recovery Month, we would be remiss for not reminding people – inside the rooms of recovery and out – that they are not alone.

Many people are struggling with symptoms of mental illness—some individuals for the first time. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that U.S. adults reported considerably elevated adverse mental health conditions linked with the COVID-19 pandemic. Of those surveyed, over 30 percent struggled with anxiety or depression; there is a significant chance that some of the respondents are still contending with symptoms.

Any mental illness must be addressed. The dangers of ignoring symptoms of depression and anxiety can result in self-medication or worse. Unfortunately, the CDC survey revealed that 10.7 percent of respondents reported having considered suicide in the 30 days prior.

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While the survey was relatively small, 5,412 adults, it’s probable that the findings are the bellwether of a more severe problem. COVID-19 cases have bogged down our entire health care system. It’s more challenging for medical professionals to assist those struggling with mental illness. When a person’s psychological distress symptoms – whether it be trauma- and stressor-related disorder or depression – is unmitigated, then adverse outcomes are practically a given.

Suicide Prevention Week 2020

September is Recovery Month and Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. What’s more, this is Suicide Prevention Week and this Thursday is World Suicide Prevention Day (September 10, 2020).

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The Each Mind Matters campaign asks organizations to focus on the intersection between suicide prevention, alcohol and drug use, and efforts that foster resilience and recovery. The initiative provides many resources that mental health and addiction recovery advocates can utilize.

Individuals can also get involved in the effort to promote hope, resiliency, and recovery. The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) invites you to share resources or your story to increase awareness on this “highly taboo and stigmatized topic.”

Not everyone is ready to speak openly about their struggle with mental illness and suicide, and that’s okay; that may be the case for you. If so, you can make a difference in many ways; social media can be a tool for letting others know that they are not alone.

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NAMI has scores of infographics and helpful wording that you can appropriate for use on your social media pages. Sharing about the ubiquity of mental illness and suicidal ideation lets those who are still suffering know that how they are feeling is not uncommon. Armed with knowledge, one might be more amenable to reaching out for help. For instance:

  • 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. experiences a mental health condition in a given year.
  • Nearly 50 million Americans manage a mental illness each day.
  • Suicide is often the result of an untreated mental health condition.
  • Half of individuals who die by suicide have a diagnosed mental illness.
  • 75 percent of people who die by suicide are male.

You Are Not Alone—Recovery is Possible

Untreated mental illness and suicide is a year-round priority. Given that 2020 is one of the most challenging years for Americans in living memory, it’s even more vital to stay connected with one another.

When we take the time to reach out or share our experience and hope for one another, we affect change and save lives. No matter how difficult life becomes, suicide is never the answer. Together we can espouse mental health treatment and recovery; we can let men, women, and teenagers know that they are not alone. NAMI writes:

Now, more than ever, we need to find ways to stay connected with our community. No one should feel alone or without the information, support, and help they need. We use this month to reach out to those affected by suicide, raise awareness, and connect individuals with suicidal ideation to treatment services. It is also important to ensure that individuals, friends, and families have access to the resources they need to discuss suicide prevention.

Please take some time this week or month to get the message out about treatment and recovery. Reach out to a friend or family member who you believe is struggling this year. A small action can make an enormous difference in the lives of others.

Mental Health Treatment for Men

Please contact PACE Recovery Center if you or someone you care about struggles with mental illness or addiction. Our evidence-based treatment programs for adult males can help bring about lasting, positive changes in one’s life. National Suicide and Recovery Month is an ideal opportunity to begin a remarkable and healing journey.

Suicide Prevention Awareness Month 2019: You’re Not Alone

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Even though suicidal ideations are treatable, and suicide is preventable, suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. Men and women take their lives for several reasons, but mental illness is a factor more times than not. During National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, it’s vital to talk about mental health and how seeking help saves lives.

The fact that Suicide Prevention Awareness Month coincides with National Recovery Month is beneficial. Addiction is a form of mental illness that often plays a role in people’s decision to end their lives. Mental health is beneficial to overall health, and encouraging people affected by mental health conditions to get the care they need is paramount.

When individuals receive evidence-based treatment, they can lead healthy and productive lives. Such people need to be made to understand that they are not alone and that others have been in their shoes. They require compassion and understanding from their communities, not stigma and shame.

Organizations like the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) work tirelessly to encourage society to care more about people with mental illness. NAMI aims to shatter the stigmas and myths that present barriers to treatment and recovery. During Suicide Prevention Month, we can all make a positive impact on those affected by mental health conditions. Your kindness, compassion, and participation are instrumental in inspiring people to reach out for support.

WhyCare? About Mental Health

One in five adults in America experiences a mental health condition in a given year, according to NAMI. One in 25 adults deals with a severe mental illness in a given year. Those who are unwilling or unable to access adequate support are at significant risk of developing unhealthy coping mechanisms. It’s not a coincidence that co-occurring substance use disorders often accompany mental illnesses like depression.

Using drugs and alcohol is just one of the harmful ways that men and women cope with mental diseases. Many will resort to self-harm to deal with their symptoms, which can progress to suicidal thoughts and actions over time. NAMI reports that 46 percent of those who die by suicide have a diagnosed mental illness. What’s more, psychological autopsies reveal that up to 90 percent of people who die by suicide have an underlying mental illness.

Sadly, too many men and women are reluctant to seek assistance for their mental illnesses or tell people about their negative thoughts. Too often, they feel cut off from society and alone; stigmas force people to keep their issues secret from their peers. Nothing good ever arises from suffering in silence. We have an obligation to combat stigmas, open up dialogues, and support those who are struggling.

NAMI’s Suicide Prevention Awareness Month WhyCare? campaign asks everyone to show that we care about people living with mental illness. The organization would like your help in disseminating stories of hope, awareness messaging, and infographics on social media. The campaign writes:

Care has the power to make a life-changing impact on those affected by mental health conditions. Through our own words and actions, we can shift the social and systemic barriers that prevent people from building better lives.

Suicide Prevention Awareness Month: You Are Not Alone

If you are in recovery from mental illness or are a suicide survivor, NAMI has created two safe, moderated spaces for sharing stories and creative expression. You Are Not Alone and OK2Talk are vehicles for men and women to inspire others with similar experiences.

Your encouragement and support let people who need help know that they are not alone. You are welcome to share your experience anonymously via several mediums, including poetry, song lyrics, inspirational quotes, drawings, photos, and videos.

You have an authentic voice. You can make a difference for yourself and others by sharing your experiences and perspectives. What has helped? What hasn’t? What has been most discouraging about your condition? What has given you hope? There are all sorts of things you know that other people want to know—you are not alone. Let them know that they aren’t either.

Orange County Mental Health Program for Men

At PACE Recovery Center, we help adult men recover from mental health disorders. Please contact us today if you or someone you care about is struggling with mental illness. Our highly credentialed clinical staff assists clients in identifying specific recovery goals and achieve their goals while preparing for productive, independent living.

If you or someone you know is in crisis, call The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK (8255) or text NAMI to 741741 or call 911 immediately.

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