Tag Archives: addiction medicine

Addiction Recovery Opens Career Doors

addiction recovery

When mind-altering substances are out of a person’s system, and a program of addiction recovery is established, many will ask, “What’s next?” Of course, the answer to that question is purely subjective. What is certain is that whatever people in recovery put their minds to can be accomplished.

Another truism for a good number of people in recovery is that they can’t go back to doing what they did before they broke the cycle of addiction. After undergoing treatment, there are some who find their previous lines of work or study untenable when leading a life in recovery. That’s not to say that there are not sober bartenders, for instance, but it’s not challenging to see why certain types of employment could jeopardize progress.

There are also young men and women in sobriety who have never held down a job. There are others who started college only to have their disease stymie the endeavor. So, with few points to jump off from in life after treatment, it is only natural that young adults will consider working in the field of addiction medicine. Moreover, people in recovery learn early on that to keep what they have they must also give it away—pay it forward. What better way to give back to the addiction recovery community than to help others find serenity, too?

In fact, it is quite common for treatment alums to volunteer their services at the very center that had a hand in saving their lives. Such individuals realize that by staying close to the source of their addiction recovery, they strengthen the foundation of their recovery. Going back home – for many people – is not always the best option following treatment.

Giving Back to The Addiction Recovery Community

Over time, volunteers or just those dedicated to sobriety often decide that the field of addiction medicine is a viable career path. One can be a productive member of society, reciprocate the gift of recovery to other willing people, and safeguard their sobriety in one fell swoop.

As one would expect, working in the substance use disorder workforce will require some education; or, a lot of schooling depending on how far one wants to go. Doctors in recovery, after all, are not unheard of, which is again a testament to the door-opening potential of working a program.

It goes without saying that attending college to become a counselor or a medical doctor will cost a significant amount of money. Except for a small demographic in America, higher education will call for student loans; and, such debts can accumulate quickly. However, we have some excellent news for anyone who is interested in working in the field of addiction recovery and medicine.

The Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Workforce Loan Repayment Program can help addiction treatment clinicians repay up to $75K in student loans, in exchange for a three-year commitment to provide substance use disorder treatment services at National Health Service Corps-approved sites. The Health Resources and Services Administration, an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, writes:

The purpose of the National Health Service Corps (NHSC) Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Workforce Loan Repayment Program (LRP) (hereafter referred to as the NHSC SUD Workforce LRP) is to recruit and retain medical, nursing, and behavioral/mental health clinicians with specific training and credentials to provide evidence-based SUD treatment and counselling [sic] in eligible communities of need designated as Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSAs).

A Career In Addiction Medicine

HSC SUD Workforce LRP participants have a choice between three years of full-time or part-time service. Those eligible will receive funds to repay their outstanding, qualifying, educational loans. One caveat is that those serving in a private facility are not eligible to practice half-time.

Dr. Gabriel Wishik, who works for Boston Health Care for the Homeless, took part in a loan repayment program from the same federal agency, according to MassLive. He points out that such programs do two things: help lure qualified candidates and increase the number of clinicians in a field that struggles to fill positions in many areas. He said, “there is a shortage at every single level in the treatment continuum.”

There are lots of competing career paths. It’s one way to get people into this career,” he said.

People in their first years of addiction recovery who have an interest in working in the field can benefit from looking to the HSC SUD Workforce LRP. At PACE Recovery Center, we encourage our clients to pursue higher education and know that men in their first years of recovery can make excellent substance use disorder technicians and clinicians. In fact, we have current team members who were once PACE Recovery Center clients.

PACE Academy

We understand that that pursuing higher education in recovery can be complicated; university culture, for instance, can put a person’s sobriety at risk. With that in mind, our PACE Academy program helps young men in early sobriety pursue their dreams and protect their sobriety. PACE Academy also provides Certified Alcohol Drug & Alcohol Associate credentialing for those interested in working in the field of addiction medicine.

Please contact us today to learn more about how you can reach your recovery and academic goals at Pace Academy.

Addiction Treatment Week and Take Back Day

addiction treatment

As Alcohol Awareness Month (AAM) concludes, it only fits that this week is National Addiction Treatment Week. Each April events are held to educate the general public, especially young people, about alcohol, alcoholism, treatment, and recovery. Alcohol use disorder is a severe mental health condition; while there is no cure for the disease, nor any form of addiction for that matter, treatment works, and recovery is possible.

One of the most significant obstacles standing in the way of people and addiction treatment is the stigma surrounding mental health disorders. Health experts and addiction medicine professionals expel tremendous energy and time spreading the message that alcohol and substance use disorders are not a moral failing but instead, a disease of the mind—the symptoms of which—can be deadly.

Please join PACE Recovery Center and the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) during National Addiction Treatment Week (April 23rd through April 29th). Help us raise awareness that addiction is a disease and that evidence-based treatments are available. Use disorders are an urgent matter in the U.S., with nearly 20.5 million Americans struggling with substance use disorder (SUD), according to the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. What’s more, only 1 in 10 people with a SUD receive treatment.

National Addiction Treatment Week

While this time is vital for raising awareness about treatable mental health conditions, it is also a call to action to young people considering working in the field of addiction. ASAM is urging clinicians to enter the area of study; the organization is hosting events and webinars for physicians and medical students about the pathways to addiction medicine certification. If you have a personal or professional interest in this vitally important area of study, you can discover more information at TreatAddictionSaveLives.org.

Raising awareness that addiction is a chronic brain disease, and not a moral failure, and qualifying more clinicians to treat addiction is vital to increasing patients’ access to treatment.” said Kelly Clark, MD, MBA, DFASAM, president of ASAM. “National Addiction Treatment Week supports ASAM’s dedication to increasing access and improving the quality of addiction treatment, and helping physicians treat addiction and save lives.

Addiction treatment and working a program of recovery provides countless opportunities to be of service to society. A not insignificant number of young men and women in recovery make the decision to pursue a career in addiction medicine after treatment, becoming counselors, therapists, and doctors. One might even argue that people with a history of addiction are uniquely equipped to help others struggling with the disease; they can relate with patients and clients on a level that your average clinician might find challenging. After all, doctors in recovery have been "there" and know firsthand what recovery asks of an individual.

DEA National Rx Take Back Day

addiction treatment

Aside National Addiction Treatment Week, there is another important event taking place on Saturday, April 28, 2018, starting at 10:00 AM. Across the United States, the general public has an opportunity to do a small deed that can help prevent drug addiction and overdose deaths. Saturday prescription drug collection sites are available in every state for the DEA’s 15th National Take-Back Day.

Did you know that the majority of prescription drugs used non-medically are obtained from family and friends, according to the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health? At that time, 6.4 million Americans engaged in nonmedical prescription medication use, many of whom found the pills in the home medicine cabinet. Last October, a total of 5,321 take back sites collected 912,305 lbs. (456 Tons) of unused medication. Perhaps this April America can set a new record and help save lives in the process. If you would like to know where you can find a collection site in your area, please click here.

Please take some time to watch a short PSA:


If you are having trouble watching, please click here.

Addiction Treatment Saves Lives

If you are a young man struggling with an alcohol or substance use disorder, PACE Recovery Center can help you break the cycle of addiction. Our dedicated team can teach you the skills and provide you the necessary tools for leading a productive life in recovery. Please contact us today to learn more about our young adult rehab program.