Tag Archives: addiction treatment

Mental Health, Adoption, and Nature v. Nurture

In the field of mental health, there has long been a debate about nature versus nurture. What is more salient to the development of young people? Is it a person's genetic history or the environment of cultivation? Naturally, people find little ease in attempting to answer such questions. These types of queries have puzzled experts in the field of psychology for years.

Such lines of inquiry are attractive for many reasons. Who among us has not had questions about what makes you who you are? We can look to our parents for answers, and we can evaluate the environs of our upbringing. And yet, we can still come away with more questions than answers. This outcome can happen to just about anyone. However, it is especially the case for those who do not have a clear picture of their history, i.e., adopted people.

When probing for a deeper understanding of our existence, many are prone to concern themselves with why they do things a particular way. Others, those contending with mental illness, might try to make sense of their struggles with a sense of urgency. When doing so, the obvious starting point is one's mother and father. Studies frequently conclude that mental illness can run in the family. However, children do not always inherit their parents' mental diseases. Some mental health experts argue that other factors must be the catalyst of psychological struggle.

There are those too who present with mental health disorders, yet do not have a clear link to mental health disorders in their family tree. Making sense of all this is a difficult undertaking. Any attempts at understanding the origins of mental strife are roughly equivalent to disentangling a Gordian knot—unpacking an intractable problem.

Nature v. Nurture

Unraveling what makes you who you are is a trying task for anybody. Unfortunately, when a person hasn't any concrete knowledge about their genetic roots, it is an overwhelming endeavor. Potentially disheartening, too. Nobody perhaps understands this more than the adopted. People who are placed for adoption at birth have little to go on when attempting to get some clarity.

The desire to follow the bread crumbs of one's past is not uncommon for adopted men and women. Such pursuits can be eye-opening experiences. But, they can also reveal aspects of one's early history that are bound to induce pain. There is a fascinating example of adoption that drives this point home. It involves an unexpected discovery that irrevocably changes the lives of three young men living in New York in the 1980s.

This Sunday, CNN is presenting a new documentary shining a spotlight on how the pursuit of knowledge can have ineluctable consequences. We want to be careful here to not spoil or misrepresent the documentarians nor their subjects. So, in the following paragraphs, some basic facts will be put forth to pique your interest. Please prepare yourself for asking some tough questions about the age-old argument of nature vs. nurture.

The environment and our experiences influence who we become, right? Three young men had to face what that means in the wake of a monumental discovery. Robert Shafran, David Kellman, and Eddy Galland all grew up in separate households located within a hundred-mile radius. Then, at the nascent age of 19, they came to discover – by sheer luck – that they share a biological link. Directed by Tim Wardle, Three Identical Strangers shows what follows from a chance discovery. It is a story of joy and is cause for utter outrage.

Three Identical Strangers

By now, you may be asking why would an adoption agency separate the triplets? The answer, a study! A research project, cloaked in secrecy, to settle long-standing theories about the role genetic and environmental factors have on our lives.

Nothing, though, would prove easy or obvious about their stories, which grow darker and more disturbing as “Three Identical Strangers” develops into a shocker," writes Manohla Dargis, the co-chief film critic for The New York Times since 2004. "Puzzle piece by piece, interview by interview, Mr. Wardle fits together a grim story of hubristic doctors and their grotesquely unprincipled enablers who played with human lives in the name of science."

Three Identical Strangers is a lot to unpack, and at times hard to watch. People with experience in adoption and mental health disorders may begin asking themselves new types of questions about their past. The film will give you a first-hand look at the impact adoption can have on a person's life. It will show what can happen to individuals when they are separated, after spending the first six months of their lives by each other's side. It is highly likely that you will never contemplate the nature v. nurture question the same way again.


If you are having trouble watching, please click here.

Three Identical Strangers premieres on CNN Sunday, January 27, 2019, at 9 p.m. ET.

Adoption-Related Mental Health Treatment

At PACE Recovery Center, we give adopted men the tools to heal from mental health and adoption issues. Mental illness affects many people who are the product of adoption; even those who grow up in loving households face real challenges that can shape who they become.

Adopted individuals can struggle with a fear of rejection and connection; they are at high risk of developing insecure attachment styles which can precipitate anxiety and depression, emotional dysregulation, and substance abuse. Please contact us today to learn how treatment can transform your life and set you on a course toward long-term recovery.

Addiction Recovery Opens Career Doors

addiction recovery

When mind-altering substances are out of a person’s system, and a program of addiction recovery is established, many will ask, “What’s next?” Of course, the answer to that question is purely subjective. What is certain is that whatever people in recovery put their minds to can be accomplished.

Another truism for a good number of people in recovery is that they can’t go back to doing what they did before they broke the cycle of addiction. After undergoing treatment, there are some who find their previous lines of work or study untenable when leading a life in recovery. That’s not to say that there are not sober bartenders, for instance, but it’s not challenging to see why certain types of employment could jeopardize progress.

There are also young men and women in sobriety who have never held down a job. There are others who started college only to have their disease stymie the endeavor. So, with few points to jump off from in life after treatment, it is only natural that young adults will consider working in the field of addiction medicine. Moreover, people in recovery learn early on that to keep what they have they must also give it away—pay it forward. What better way to give back to the addiction recovery community than to help others find serenity, too?

In fact, it is quite common for treatment alums to volunteer their services at the very center that had a hand in saving their lives. Such individuals realize that by staying close to the source of their addiction recovery, they strengthen the foundation of their recovery. Going back home – for many people – is not always the best option following treatment.

Giving Back to The Addiction Recovery Community

Over time, volunteers or just those dedicated to sobriety often decide that the field of addiction medicine is a viable career path. One can be a productive member of society, reciprocate the gift of recovery to other willing people, and safeguard their sobriety in one fell swoop.

As one would expect, working in the substance use disorder workforce will require some education; or, a lot of schooling depending on how far one wants to go. Doctors in recovery, after all, are not unheard of, which is again a testament to the door-opening potential of working a program.

It goes without saying that attending college to become a counselor or a medical doctor will cost a significant amount of money. Except for a small demographic in America, higher education will call for student loans; and, such debts can accumulate quickly. However, we have some excellent news for anyone who is interested in working in the field of addiction recovery and medicine.

The Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Workforce Loan Repayment Program can help addiction treatment clinicians repay up to $75K in student loans, in exchange for a three-year commitment to provide substance use disorder treatment services at National Health Service Corps-approved sites. The Health Resources and Services Administration, an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, writes:

The purpose of the National Health Service Corps (NHSC) Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Workforce Loan Repayment Program (LRP) (hereafter referred to as the NHSC SUD Workforce LRP) is to recruit and retain medical, nursing, and behavioral/mental health clinicians with specific training and credentials to provide evidence-based SUD treatment and counselling [sic] in eligible communities of need designated as Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSAs).

A Career In Addiction Medicine

HSC SUD Workforce LRP participants have a choice between three years of full-time or part-time service. Those eligible will receive funds to repay their outstanding, qualifying, educational loans. One caveat is that those serving in a private facility are not eligible to practice half-time.

Dr. Gabriel Wishik, who works for Boston Health Care for the Homeless, took part in a loan repayment program from the same federal agency, according to MassLive. He points out that such programs do two things: help lure qualified candidates and increase the number of clinicians in a field that struggles to fill positions in many areas. He said, “there is a shortage at every single level in the treatment continuum.”

There are lots of competing career paths. It’s one way to get people into this career,” he said.

People in their first years of addiction recovery who have an interest in working in the field can benefit from looking to the HSC SUD Workforce LRP. At PACE Recovery Center, we encourage our clients to pursue higher education and know that men in their first years of recovery can make excellent substance use disorder technicians and clinicians. In fact, we have current team members who were once PACE Recovery Center clients.

PACE Academy

We understand that that pursuing higher education in recovery can be complicated; university culture, for instance, can put a person’s sobriety at risk. With that in mind, our PACE Academy program helps young men in early sobriety pursue their dreams and protect their sobriety. PACE Academy also provides Certified Alcohol Drug & Alcohol Associate credentialing for those interested in working in the field of addiction medicine.

Please contact us today to learn more about how you can reach your recovery and academic goals at Pace Academy.

Addiction Recovery Strengthened Through Exercise

addiction

As an addiction treatment center, PACE Recovery Center hopes that everyone working a program has a plan for New Year’s Eve. Our most recent posts provide some guidance for keeping recovery intact and setting resolutions you can follow. 2019 is about to get underway, and it can be a year of continued progress.

People who undergo addiction treatment learn that physical and spiritual health is a top priority. Men and women who seek to overcome and recover from mental illness benefit from leading a healthier life. Many addiction treatment centers encourage clients to engage in athletic activities as a means of facilitating healing. Persistent drug and alcohol use takes a toll on both mind and body, requiring healing. To that end, allotting a few hours each week to exercise establishes a healthy behavior and promotes wellbeing.

Substance use is a behavior that carries severe risks to one's health. However, once drugs and alcohol are out of the picture doesn't mean necessarily that an individual's mind and body will bounce right back. Encouraging wellbeing means eating nutritional foods and making an exercise routine. People living with physical disabilities will have to scale back such activities some, but they can benefit from physical fitness too.

Each year, at this time, many people in recovery resolve themselves to make physical fitness a priority. It is possible to lead a healthier existence in recovery and strengthen other areas of one's life just by taking a little time to get the heart beating faster. Naturally, routines should be realistic; no need to overdo it and risk burning out or worse, get hurt. Individuals currently in addiction treatment should ask counselors for guidance. Those working a program outside rehab can turn to their support group for support and perhaps an exercise partner.

How Can Exercise Help My Addiction Recovery?

Research regarding the benefits of exercise, in recovery, can be difficult to unpack. There are several studies on the topic. There are many approaches, each person has to find a routine that works well. Whichever one decides (i.e., jogging, biking, or swimming) most experts agree, physical fitness aids recovery outcomes. While working out alone will by no means lead to recovery, exercising in conjunction with psychotherapy and mutual-help groups, for instance, is quite beneficial.

Claire Twark M.D., writing for the Harvard Health Blog, points out some of the positives of exercise in recovery. Dr. Twark works at Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital Addiction Recovery Program in Massachusetts. She has found that "exercise helps to distract them [patients with various substance use disorders] from cravings. Workouts add structure to the day. They help with forming positive social connections, and help treat depression and anxiety in combination with other therapies."

In her article, Dr. Twark highlights nonprofit organizations advocating for physical activity for people in recovery. As such, individuals can do more than just promote physical wellbeing, they can exercise for a sense of community. The Boston Bulldogs Running Club is for people with addiction and their friends and families. The Phoenix is a community of sober individuals bonding through peer-led CrossFit, yoga, rock climbing, boxing, running, and hiking events. Such activities occur across the country, as well as in the area north and south of PACE, in Long Beach and Costa Mesa, CA.

Those thinking of incorporating an exercise routine into their program of recovery will experience health benefits. Continuing to promote physical well-being outside of addiction treatment, provides an outlet for a more significant sense of community. If exercise is a resolution of yours, again, please consult with your support group. There is always strength in numbers.

Addiction Treatment In 2019

Many men who are currently struggling with alcohol or substance use disorder would like 2019 to be a year of change. However, embarking on a quest for healing is an objective that requires assistance. At PACE Recovery Center, it would be our great pleasure to be part of your incredible journey into recovery. Please contact us today to make the New Year one of progress.

The Gentlemen of PACE Recovery Center would like to wish everyone a safe and recovery-focused New Year’s Eve.

Addiction Medicine Pioneer Leaves Lasting Impressions

addiction

Addiction medicine is – in the grand scheme of things – a relatively new field. The transition from seeing use disorders as a choice or worse a sin, one commonly made by those with shortages in moral fiber for instance, to that of a disease can be traced to the middle of the 20th century.

The first Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders or DSM treated substance use disorder (i.e., “drug addiction” and “alcoholism”) as most commonly arising from a primary personality disorder. As you can probably imagine, the previous action stigmatized addiction by listing it with other societally disapproved disorders. In 1965, the American Medical Association (1965) recognized alcoholism, declaring the condition a medical disorder. The DSM-II (1968) encouraged separate diagnoses for alcoholism and drug addiction, according to the US National Library of Medicine. The DSM would make several changes over the years regarding how scientists and the medical community conceptualized unhealthy relationships with drugs and alcohol.

  • DSM-III (1980): adopted atheoretical, descriptive diagnoses but required tolerance or withdrawal to diagnose dependence.
  • DSM-III-R (1987): included physiological and behavioral symptoms and reflected the substance dependence syndrome.
  • DSM-IV (1994): the concept of dependence was unchanged, i.e., emphasis on biology.>/li.
  • DSM-V (2013): declares that all substances taken in excess activate the brain reward system.

Pioneers In Addiction Medicine and Recovery

The criteria for addiction have evolved over the years and so have the modalities of treatment. Such changes are owed to the tireless work put in by several individuals, perhaps too many to list. In the 19th Century, an 1849 essay titled Alcoholismus Chronicus, by Swedish physician Magnus Huss gave birth to the disease model. Huss’ essay defines the characteristics of alcoholism (a brand-new term at the time) as disease-like in nature; one that causes severe physical harm and can be fatal. Another body of work of note is E.M. Jellinek’s The Disease Concept of Alcoholism, which splits alcohol addiction into several stages.

In the field of recovery and use disorder treatment, some people come to mind often. Bill Wilson is a notable name, being a co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous in the 1930s; a program that relies on addressing the spiritual side of the disease. While 12 Step programs are not scientific, many treatment centers utilize them along with other forms of therapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Nora Volkow is someone who is worth mentioning as she heads up the National Institute On Drug Abuse (NIDA). There are also other names that most people have not heard – even those who work in the field today – whose contributions to addiction medicine deserve mention.

Dr. Herbert D. Kleber is one person who deserves recognition, especially in light of his recent passing. It’s fair to say that most Americans are unfamiliar with Dr. Kleber, even those who have undergone treatment in centers that utilize evidence-based methods. A researcher in the pathology of addiction, Dr. Kleber worked to develop evidence-based techniques to ease the discomfort of withdrawal, The New York Times reports. He also focused on helping such people avoid relapse and achieve long-term recovery.

Evidence Based Therapy

Upon completing his medical residency, Kleber went on to volunteer for the United States Public Health Service. His service took him to Public Health Service Prison Hospital (PHSPH) at Lexington, Ky. in 1964, roughly a year before the AMA’s recognizing alcoholism as a medical disorder. The PHSPH was a jail treating addicts and alcoholics, as part of the Addiction Research Center, NIDA’s predecessor.

Dr. Kleber understood that people with use disorders did not deserve punishment, according to the article. He would instead take a scientific approach; the doctor was instrumental in making the study of addiction into a discipline.

He was at the vanguard of bringing scientific rigor to the area of addiction,” said Dr. Frances R. Levin, director of the division on substance use disorders at Columbia University Medical Center, a program started by Dr. Kleber.

Over the decades, Kleber would continue to influence the field; he started and oversaw the drug dependence unit at Yale, the article reports. With his wife, he founded the division on substance use disorder at Columbia. Kleber was also a co-founder of the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse, now the Center on Addiction. He served as deputy to the Nation’s first drug czar during the George H.W. Bush administration. However, his dismay with the “war on drugs” and the lack of funding going towards addiction treatment led to his resignation. At his confirmation, someone asked how he remained optimistic working with addicts; responding by quoting the Talmud he said:

The day is short. The task is difficult. It is not our duty to finish it, but we are forbidden not to try.”

Addiction Treatment

In 2015, Dr. Kleber said, “the last thing in the world I wanted to do was to treat addiction.” It is hard to imagine what addiction medicine would be today if it were not for Dr. Herbert D. Kleber contributions to the field. The Gentleman of PACE would like to express our gratitude for Dr. Kleber.

We invite you to reach out to us if you are struggling with drugs or alcohol and desire to find a new way to live. At PACE, we specialize in the treatment of males affected by use disorders and coöccurring mental illness.

Recovery Month: Behavioral Health is Essential

recovery month

Last Friday, August 31, 2018, millions of people around the globe observed International Overdose Awareness Day. The goal of the annual event aims to raise awareness of overdose, reduce the stigma of a drug-related death, and remind everyone that overdose death is preventable. In 2017, more than 70,000 Americans died of an overdose; more than 60,000 in 2016; and, over 50,000 people died of drug toxicity in 2015. The rising death rate continues even though the overdose antidote naloxone is available, and efforts are underway to expand access to addiction treatment. While several initiatives and legislative measures are helping this most severe public health crisis, there is much more work that needs to happen.

One of the most effective ways to prevent overdose and save lives is through advocating for addiction recovery. Naloxone can reverse the effects of a toxic dose of heroin or oxycodone, but, long-term recovery is the surest way of avoiding the risk of overdose. A significant facet of last week’s day of awareness is acknowledging society’s need for putting an end to stigmatizing people who use drugs. If you saw anyone wearing a silver badge or purple wristband on Friday, such people were symbolizing their commitment to this most important subject matter.

It isn’t a secret that a significant percentage of Americans still look upon people who are in the grips of a use disorder unfavorably. Earlier this year, a survey by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research shined a light on stigma in America. A majority of Americans view drug addiction as a disease that requires treatment, but fewer than 1 in 5 are willing to closely associate with someone struggling with the condition, i.e., a friend, co-worker or neighbor.

National Recovery Month

The above poll is a clear indication of stigma’s dogged persistence. Most people understand that use disorder is a treatable medical condition, and yet only one-fifth want anything to do with such people. We don’t want to imply that stigma is as pervasive as it once was, we have come a long way; however, the only way to encourage more people to seek treatment and recovery is through destigmatization of the disease.

There are useful methods of bringing a higher number of individuals around to accepting addicts and alcoholics more humanely. For one, by highlighting the achievements of the millions of Americans who have reclaimed their lives in recovery. Each day, men and women across the nation wake up and recommit themselves to doing whatever it takes to stay clean and sober. Such persons are living examples of the possibility of recovery; acquiring decades of sobriety by following the direction of those who came before is a reality for many.

September is National Recovery Month! The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Association (SAMHSA) organizes events held across the United States to educate Americans about the benefits of addiction treatment. The organization works tirelessly to get the word out that mental health services can help men and women with a mental and substance use disorder live a productive and fulfilling life. And, they are asking for your help. Those in recovery and their families are invited to share the gains made by seeking treatment and working a program. If you are interested in getting involved, please follow the link; once there, you will find “Recovery Month tools, graphics, and resources to spread the positive message that behavioral health is essential to overall health, that prevention works, treatment is effective, and people can and do recover.”

Join the Voices for Recovery

Each year, SAMHSA chooses a theme for guiding local and national Recovery Month events. This year’s theme is “Join the Voices for Recovery: Invest in Health, Home, Purpose, and Community.” SAMHSA states:

The 2018 theme explores how integrated care, a strong community, sense of purpose, and leadership contributes to effective treatments that sustain the recovery of persons with mental and substance use disorders. The observance will work to highlight inspiring stories to help people from all walks of life find the path to hope, health, and wellness.”

Addiction Treatment

Recovery Month doesn’t just revolve around propping up people who have turned their lives around with the help of addiction recovery services. The observance is also about honoring the treatment and service providers who have, and continue to help, people from all walks of life find the miracle of recovery. The Gentlemen of PACE Recovery Center would like to commend the thousands of individuals who’ve dedicated their lives to helping others find the guiding light of addiction recovery. It is worth noting that a large percentage of people working in the field of mental health care are, in fact, in recovery themselves—paying it forward.

At PACE, we specialize in gender-specific addiction and mental health treatment services. If you are an adult male suffering from alcohol, substance use, or a co-occurring mental health disorder, please contact us today. We can help you begin making the changes necessary for a life of sustained recovery.

PACE Recovery Center is LegitScript Certified

legitscript certified rehabAt PACE Recovery Center, we are dedicated to providing men with the skills and knowledge for working a program of long-term addiction recovery. For people to break the cycle, adopt a program of maintenance, and continue to make progress after treatment, it is vital that they have proper guidance early on in the process. It is worth remembering that successful treatment outcomes depend upon helping clients understand that practically everything has to change if recovery is to prevail.

Seeking treatment, while vital, isn’t always as simple as typing “best drug rehab” into Google. With thousands of centers to choose from, how is a person to be sure that the selected center is the right fit? The quest for reliable recovery centers to advocate for your wellbeing is compounded by the fact that websites are often deceptive regarding their quality of care. A flashy website with all the right verbiage doesn’t always match what clients actually experience.

With more people than ever seeking addiction treatment services, it’s crucial that families can find adequately vetted centers. Some of our readers may remember that Google suspended addiction treatment and rehab centers from advertising on search engines and apps last fall. The moratorium is the result of various companies’ reliance on deceptive marketing practices, essentially praying on the vulnerability of addicts, alcoholics, and their families. So, with all the misinformation about what treatment centers can provide, how is a family to know they are in good hands? One new answer is LegitScript.

Trusted Names In Addiction Treatment

Typically, the most reliable treatment options are those with specific accreditations, like that given by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). A stamp of approval from CARF means that a provider meets rigorous standards of care and treatment practices. Merely put, a CARF-approved center means a client is in excellent hands.

Our commitment to providing potential clients assurances that choosing PACE is their safest option led us to undergo LegitScript's vetting process. A LegitScript monitored center is one that Google will allow to recommence online advertising, if they so choose, after the ban implemented in September 2017. The Portland-based company was only in the business of verifying the standards of online pharmacies and supplement providers. Now, in the wake of countless unscrupulous treatment providers’ online advertising, LegitScript adds addiction treatment to its wheelhouse.

Being LegitScript-certified means you can fully participate in online advertising, e-commerce, and payment processing programs with minimal disruptions. Many of the world’s leading companies require or recognize LegitScript Certification.”

 

PACE Recovery is Legitimate, Legal, and Trustworthy

We followed LegitScript's strict guidelines for certification, and PACE Recovery Center is now pleased to announce that LegitScript certifies PACERECOVERYCENTER.COM. After LegitScript reviewed our website and treatment practices, it was determined that we meet their “standards for legality, safety, and transparency!”

Along with our CARF accreditation, families can rest assured that their loved one is in the best possible setting for bringing about lasting recovery. If you are ready to take steps for leading a life free from drugs and alcohol, PACE Recovery Center can give you the tools and teach you how to cope with life on life’s terms. Please contact us today to learn more about our multi-pronged approach to men's addiction and mental health treatment.

Addiction Treatment Week and Take Back Day

addiction treatment

As Alcohol Awareness Month (AAM) concludes, it only fits that this week is National Addiction Treatment Week. Each April events are held to educate the general public, especially young people, about alcohol, alcoholism, treatment, and recovery. Alcohol use disorder is a severe mental health condition; while there is no cure for the disease, nor any form of addiction for that matter, treatment works, and recovery is possible.

One of the most significant obstacles standing in the way of people and addiction treatment is the stigma surrounding mental health disorders. Health experts and addiction medicine professionals expel tremendous energy and time spreading the message that alcohol and substance use disorders are not a moral failing but instead, a disease of the mind—the symptoms of which—can be deadly.

Please join PACE Recovery Center and the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) during National Addiction Treatment Week (April 23rd through April 29th). Help us raise awareness that addiction is a disease and that evidence-based treatments are available. Use disorders are an urgent matter in the U.S., with nearly 20.5 million Americans struggling with substance use disorder (SUD), according to the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. What’s more, only 1 in 10 people with a SUD receive treatment.

National Addiction Treatment Week

While this time is vital for raising awareness about treatable mental health conditions, it is also a call to action to young people considering working in the field of addiction. ASAM is urging clinicians to enter the area of study; the organization is hosting events and webinars for physicians and medical students about the pathways to addiction medicine certification. If you have a personal or professional interest in this vitally important area of study, you can discover more information at TreatAddictionSaveLives.org.

Raising awareness that addiction is a chronic brain disease, and not a moral failure, and qualifying more clinicians to treat addiction is vital to increasing patients’ access to treatment.” said Kelly Clark, MD, MBA, DFASAM, president of ASAM. “National Addiction Treatment Week supports ASAM’s dedication to increasing access and improving the quality of addiction treatment, and helping physicians treat addiction and save lives.

Addiction treatment and working a program of recovery provides countless opportunities to be of service to society. A not insignificant number of young men and women in recovery make the decision to pursue a career in addiction medicine after treatment, becoming counselors, therapists, and doctors. One might even argue that people with a history of addiction are uniquely equipped to help others struggling with the disease; they can relate with patients and clients on a level that your average clinician might find challenging. After all, doctors in recovery have been "there" and know firsthand what recovery asks of an individual.

DEA National Rx Take Back Day

addiction treatment

Aside National Addiction Treatment Week, there is another important event taking place on Saturday, April 28, 2018, starting at 10:00 AM. Across the United States, the general public has an opportunity to do a small deed that can help prevent drug addiction and overdose deaths. Saturday prescription drug collection sites are available in every state for the DEA’s 15th National Take-Back Day.

Did you know that the majority of prescription drugs used non-medically are obtained from family and friends, according to the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health? At that time, 6.4 million Americans engaged in nonmedical prescription medication use, many of whom found the pills in the home medicine cabinet. Last October, a total of 5,321 take back sites collected 912,305 lbs. (456 Tons) of unused medication. Perhaps this April America can set a new record and help save lives in the process. If you would like to know where you can find a collection site in your area, please click here.

Please take some time to watch a short PSA:


If you are having trouble watching, please click here.

Addiction Treatment Saves Lives

If you are a young man struggling with an alcohol or substance use disorder, PACE Recovery Center can help you break the cycle of addiction. Our dedicated team can teach you the skills and provide you the necessary tools for leading a productive life in recovery. Please contact us today to learn more about our young adult rehab program.

John Goodman’s Battle With Alcoholism

alcoholism

Before John Goodman was a cultural icon known as Walter, the off-kilter, Jewish convert, Vietnam Vet who ‘doesn’t roll on Shomer Shabbos in “The Big Lebowski,”’ he was best known for his role as Dan Conner in “Roseanne.” Many of our readers may not remember that in the 1990’s, “Roseanne” dominated television ratings thanks to the humorous and touching interplay between Goodman and Roseanne Barr. Those of you who were regular watchers of the show may find it surprising to learn that all was not well on the set of the show during its first nine seasons, owing to John Goodman’s alcoholism.

Those of you familiar with John Goodman's body of work know that he is an immensely capable actor whose roles leave a lasting impression. From Hollywood to Broadway, he is notorious for stealing the scene; a powerhouse actor in Academy award-winning films, such as The Artist (2011) and Argo (2012). His honors for television include both Emmy and Golden Globe Awards.

After 21 years off the air, "Roseanne" returned to television with the original cast. Just to give you an idea of how successful the first show run (1988-1997) was, the current series premiere held the attention of more than 18 million viewers. Naturally, both Roseanne Barr and Goodman are fielding interviews left and right; and some of the questions people are asking Goodman concern his battle with alcoholism.

Addiction Beneath the Surface

In a recent interview with TODAY’s Willie Geist, Goodman discusses what finally occurred for him to seek addiction treatment. The combination of starring in a hit television show and his newfound loss of anonymity, Goodman says he began using alcohol to cope. He says he almost didn't see the series through to its end; he admits that drink on set was a regular occurrence; “My speech would be slurred.”

I got complacent and ungrateful. And after nine years—eight years, I wanted to leave the show,” he said. “I handled it like I did everything else, by sittin' on a bar stool. And that made it worse.

Some ten years ago after going on a severe bender, he found himself with shaking hands in need of help, according to the interview. Goodman called his wife, and from there he went into treatment.

I was shaking, I was still drinking, but I was still shaking," he said, recalling that weekend. "I had the clarity of thought that I needed to be hospitalized.

Please take some time to watch the interview:

If you are having trouble watching, please click here.

Alcoholism Standing in the Way

One takeaway from Goodman’s decade-long sobriety is that life and work are possible without using alcohol as a coping mechanism. He was unable to appreciate life when he was at the top of the world in the 90’s because of his alcoholism; the reboot is an opportunity for him to do things differently, to do things right. It goes to show that when drugs and alcohol are out of the picture, one has the opportunity to be grateful for life and all the many blessings.

If you are a young man caught in the grips of alcoholism, PACE Recovery Center can help you break the cycle of addiction and begin the journey of recovery. Please contact us today to learn more about our program.

Opioid Use Disorder Tackled On A&E INTERVENTION℠

opioid use disorder

Last year, we had the opportunity at PACE Recovery Center to help a young man break the cycle of addiction and begin the life-saving journey of recovery. Many of our regular readers probably remember the excellent work we did with A&E’s program INTERVENTION? The show directed their spotlight on then 23-year old Sturgill who, like so many young Americans, developed an opioid use disorder. His story was not too dissimilar from a significant portion of the more than 2 million opiate addicts in the U.S., Sturgill’s opioid use disorder stemmed from painkillers prescribed for an injury.

Opioid addiction and the eponymous epidemic is the result of liberal prescribing practices. The trend of overprescribing arose out the pharmaceutical industry’s effort to spread false or misleading information about the dangers of drugs likes OxyContin. Once patients became addicted to their painkillers, the majority found little recourse for dealing with their condition, due to limited access to addiction treatment services.

The situation in America today is not any different from when Sturgill came to PACE for assistance, the problem in America is dire. The number is not in yet for 2017, but overdose deaths are expected to surpass the previous year, which boasted the highest death toll on record. Efforts to curb the epidemic have shown some promise, to be sure, although the outbreak is far from coming to an end. Doctors still prescribe opioids with little prejudice, patients don't receive info about opioid-alternatives for pain, and treatment centers in most of America are challenging to access.

What’s more, prescription opioids are only one facet of the epidemic; heroin, fentanyl-laced heroin, and fentanyl pills disguised as popular painkillers continue to steal American lives.

A&E INTERVENTION℠ Tackles Heroin

Last week, A&E kicked off its new season of INTERVENTION℠; this year the show's producers decided to focus on the opioid addiction epidemic. The first episode directed viewer’s attention to what is dubbed the heroin triangle north of Atlanta, according to Daily Report. The triangle includes affluent Cobb, Fulton, and Gwinnett counties, is struggling with opioids; Cobb County District Attorney Vic Reynolds hopes the show will draw people's attention to the heroin crisis throughout the country. He’d also like people to see some of the novel approaches utilized in North Atlanta; in an interview, DA Reynolds echoed what many experts have said about addiction for decades:

We cannot arrest our way out of this heroin epidemic,” Reynolds said. “It cannot be done.”

The series premiere last Tuesday included two one-hour episodes; if you missed them hopefully, you can catch a rerun. For the next seven weeks (Tuesday at 9 PM) INTERVENTION℠ will cover aspects of the epidemic in the areas affected greatest.

As a testament to the severity of the country’s current opioid crises, this season focuses on the victims of this epidemic and exposes the widespread impact of addiction on a community-wide scale,” Elaine Frontain Bryant, head of programming for A&E Network, said in a news release. “We are extremely proud of the tremendous work of our interventionists and we hope the stories told this season serve as a beacon of hope to those suffering directly and indirectly from opioid addiction.”

Opioid Use Disorder Recovery

When mainstream media sheds light on public health epidemics like the opioid addiction crisis, it can lead to progress. Putting human faces to something that people mostly understood via statistics opens people’s minds to the true nature of addiction. The problem we face is a disease, a mental health disorder that has no known cure but is treatable, effectively. It should go without saying that addiction treatment is the most effective tool used in addressing the epidemic. Recovery is possible if people have access to the necessary resources.

If you are one of the millions of Americans touched by opioid use disorder, please contact PACE Recovery Center.

What You Learned In Addiction Treatment

addiction treatment

On January 1, 2018, the State of California begins a new chapter regarding marijuana. The drug is legal to use for adults over the age of 21 after the holiday season comes to an end. The change in legality may not seem like a big deal, after all, a medical marijuana program has been in place for two decades. California became the first state to allow doctors to recommend cannabis for specific health conditions in 1996. However, broad legalization for recreational purposes could create problems for some people, especially those in recovery.

Cannabis use laws in California are of particular interest to us at PACE Recovery Center—with our specialty being addiction treatment. We are aware that young adult males are a demographic long associated with high marijuana use. Legalization could have the unintended effect of encouraging people in recovery to think that a little “pot” use is harmless. People without a history of cannabis misuse may convince themselves that the drug will not be a sobriety breach.

It’s entirely vital that those in recovery from any form of addiction understand the inherent dangers of using marijuana. Just because your drug of choice (DOC) is alcohol, doesn’t mean that cannabis is fair game. Many an alcoholic has experienced a full-blown relapse because they thought of a little weed smoke as harmless. It’s not just people with alcohol use disorders, either; hard drug users often scoff at the addictive nature of weed. True, fewer people reach the depths of despair from cannabis use, compared to other “harder” drugs. Nevertheless, such realities don’t imply the drug is safe.

Recovery Work Going Up In Smoke

Smoking pot is a sure way for people in recovery to find themselves returning to their DOC. If you’re regularly attending 12 Steps meetings, then there is good chance you have heard where cannabis use leads. It doesn’t matter which substance precipitated requiring addiction treatment; no mind-altering drug is safe. Addiction is a severe mental health disorder, and substance use is merely a symptom of the overall condition. Introducing any euphoria-producing drug to your body can cause severe problems in your life, and jeopardize your recovery program.

Whether you have 30 days or 30 years sober, you’ve have invested much into turning your life around. Using marijuana will cause all your hard work in recovery to go up in smoke. Legality shouldn’t impact your decision to partake in cannabis use; mental health pays no mind to the laws of man. Case in point: despite alcohol’s legality, the substance is highly addictive and takes more lives than any other vice. In spite of marijuana's benign nature, use can lead to dependence, addiction, and other health problems.

People in recovery who decide to use THC (Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol) products are at even higher risk of experiencing problems. More times than not, recovering addicts and alcoholics return to their drug of choice after using cannabis. It may not happen right away, but smoking weed will cause the minds of people with use disorders to crave their DOC. Usually, it’s a question of when, not if, regarding a return to more dangerous mind-altering chemicals.

Ask Around

If you’re still relatively new to recovery or fresh out of addiction treatment, we hope you grasp what’s at stake. Getting to where you are today required tremendous courage and even more effort, breaking the cycle of addiction wasn’t an accident. If you are living in California, some of your peers may be excited about the “green tide” coming into port. If they are not in recovery, using marijuana is their prerogative; if they’re in the program, keep your distance.

People in recovery contemplating using the drug come January should consult others with more recovery time, first. Chances are, such people will share relapse horror stories that began with something innocuous like cannabis, like cases when a little bit of pot resulted in a drug of choice relapse. Your older peers may tell you of former members who never made it back to the program after using marijuana.

Please remind yourself of what you learned while in addiction treatment. For starters, yours is an incurable disease! Without continued spiritual maintenance and steadfast dedication to total abstinence, everything you’ve tirelessly worked for could disappear. While relapse is a part of many people’s story, there are no guarantees of making it back to the rooms. Anything you can do to protect your recovery’s survival, the better; avoiding marijuana falls on the list of such things.

Cannabis Addiction Treatment

Again, young adult males use marijuana more than any other demographic. As a result, such people often find themselves in the grip of cannabis use disorder and require assistance. If your life is unmanageable due to marijuana use, please contact PACE Recovery Center. We specialize in the treating young adult males with substance use disorders. Our experienced team can help you break the cycle of addiction and self-defeating behavior. Life in recovery is possible; we can give you the tools to make it a reality.