Tag Archives: fellowship

Addiction Recovery: A Positive Attitude Helps You

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As 2020 winds down, it may be challenging to look back without a sense of melancholy. Nearly one million people have died thus far worldwide; tens of millions have contracted COVID-19. Many members of the addiction recovery community have come face to face with the novel illness.

You may know someone who has contracted the coronavirus or passed away. If so: our thoughts and prayers go out to you. We also hope that your well-being and program have not been compromised owing to grief and mourning.

COVID-19 has tested and continues to test the addiction recovery fellowship. Not long ago, it would have been hard to imagine that millions of people in recovery would forgo in-person meetings for a digital option. Who could have dreamt that an untold number of men and women seeking a new way of life would attend their first 12 Step meeting via video conferencing?

Fortunately, members of the community have banded together for the common cause of recovery. You continue to meet the day by carrying the message (online) to alcoholics who still suffer—those unable to cope with the “slings and arrows of outrageous fortune.”

It’s comforting to know that the hands of programs like Alcoholics Anonymous remain open to the newcomer. The new normal is far from ideal but there is a solution to be found. Support is always there for those who need it, including any one of the untold number of individuals who relapsed recently. Knowing that they still have an outlet to reconnect with the fellowship is uplifting.

Positivity: A Gift from Recovery

Undoubtedly, the last several months were taxing, and many have found cause to despair. Risk of contraction, mass layoffs, financial insecurity, and divisive sentiments come to mind when looking backward and presently. However, you have the power to decide how you perceive what is happening. You can choose to zero-in on life with a negative lens, or you can single out what’s positive today.

There is much to be grateful for of late. The tens of thousands of men and women in the field of medicine are a perfect example. It’s challenging to overlook their heroic acts—tending to and treating the millions of people impacted by the coronavirus. Every day, such individuals put on a face mask and go into the trenches to care for the infected. Remember that their selfless acts could have fatal consequences, but they suit up each day regardless of the risks.

The heroes of medicine are just one of the myriad examples of greatness shining today. We implore you to recognize the many beacons of hope lighting your surroundings. Observing acts of kindness is empowering and can inspire you to continue reaching out your hand to others. There is a comfort to be had in the realization that we are all in this together.

September is National Recovery Month: a time to acknowledge the gains made by millions of people across the country. It’s uplifting to remind yourself of the gifts that working a program gives to people. Commitment pays off; just about anything is possible and achievable in recovery.

Even those with a shorter length of sobriety – those in early recovery – quickly see their lives improve before their eyes. Recovery gives individuals the tools to be free from self-defeating and negative states of mind. With a positive outlook, one can seize the day.

A Positive Life in Addiction Recovery

If the pandemic has impacted your life and you have had difficulty seeing the bright side of late, please do not be discouraged. You do not have to work through your challenges alone. What’s more, it’s beneficial to discuss your hardships with your peers. The addiction recovery fellowship is always there when one needs it most.

Keeping negative thoughts to yourself will only serve to worsen an already challenging situation. Sharing what you are going through with others will help you. It will also help others who are experiencing similar hardships. Moreover, the feedback of others will quickly remind you that you are not alone. Knowing that others care will help you put negativity to bed and foster a positive attitude.

A Positive Attitude Changes Everything! Remember, if you still have your recovery, you still have much to be grateful for today. If you decide to harness the power of positivity, it will be easier to get through darker days. Take stock in the gains you make, no matter how small.

Recognize the milestones you make in recovery; getting through another day sober is a monumental achievement if you choose to see it that way. You can get through any challenge without drugs and alcohol in your life. This September, take time to celebrate the gains you’ve made in recovery—it will strengthen your resolve for continued progress.

Our chief want is someone who will inspire us to be what we know we could be.” –Ralph Waldo Emerson–

Gender-Specific Treatment Center for Men

PACE Recovery Center offers gender-specific addiction recovery programs for men. Please contact us today to learn more about our center and the evidence-based therapies we utilize. Our highly skilled team of professionals can help you begin a remarkable journey and set you on a path to leading a positive and fulfilling life in recovery.

Addiction Recovery: Brotherhood and Fellowship is Beneficial

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One of the benefits of seeking gender-specific addiction treatment is fostering relationships with people of the same sex. Early recovery is a challenging time, and avoiding distractions is paramount. Men who stick close to other men are better able to stay the course of addiction recovery during this period.

At PACE Recovery Center, we firmly believe that men can more easily stay focused without the distraction of the other sex. Gender-specific treatment provides men the opportunity to bond and work closely with relatable people. Our facility gives men the ability to address the factors that contributed to their addiction from the male perspective.

Addiction is a complex disease that affects men and women in different ways. Adult males face unique societal, familial, and environmental pressures, some of which play a role in developing alcohol and substance use disorders.

Being in the company of individuals who have faced similar pressures as you is hugely beneficial. Men understand each other better, and in ways that women cannot, which is why choosing gender-specific treatment is ideal for achieving successful outcomes.

Some of the fellows you go through addiction treatment with will become lifelong brothers in recovery. Brotherhood and fellowship are essential to sustain lasting recovery.

A Recovery Brotherhood

After treatment, you will work closely with other men to achieve common goals. Your sponsor will also be male, which means he can understand what you’re going through when working the steps. What’s more, your deep bench of support will consist primarily of men; these are the people you will turn to when obstacles arise.

While you will inevitably foster platonic relationships with women in the program by attending meetings, building strong bonds with men must come first. If you prioritize establishing a strong sense of community with other men, then you will be better able to always put your recovery first.

Early addiction recovery is a fragile time that requires dedication and focus. Members of the opposite sex can be a significant distraction during your first year. Friendships with women can quickly morph into something more. You may have heard by now that it’s best to steer clear of romantic entanglements during your first year.

You will have a much better understanding of how you perceive and connect with the opposite sex once you have worked all 12 Steps. Many men in early recovery do not know how to be only friends with women. Moreover, female interactions can be triggers for some individuals; romance has been a factor for many a relapse in early recovery. So is rejection!

If you develop feelings for another member of the program and it’s unrequited, it can lead to negative self-talk and a sense of unworthiness. You can avoid such occurrences by sticking close to other men in the program.

As you become more stable in your recovery, you will learn how to have healthy relationships with women. There is no need to rush because there will be plenty of time down the road for romance, provided that recovery comes first always.

Lifelong Friendships with Men in Addiction Recovery

Finding long-term recovery depends upon your ability to work closely with other men. Achieving milestones in the program doesn’t happen without help. If you bond with men in your homegroup – both inside and outside the meeting rooms – they will become your sober friend group.

After working with such people for an extended period, you will feel a connection. There will not be anything that you will not feel comfortable sharing with your brothers in recovery. Your male friends will provide you with valuable feedback and help you stay accountable. They will also let you know if they think you are putting something before your recovery.

Simply put, having friends is essential to sustaining your program, and having friends of the same sex is best in early recovery. If you stay the course and follow directions, you are guaranteed to develop lifelong friendships with men in addiction recovery.

Southern California Gender-Specific Addiction Treatment

While beginning a journey of recovery at a co-ed facility is possible, those hoping to break the cycle of addiction for good often find gender-specific treatment the best starting point. If you are an adult male who is struggling with addiction, co-occurring disorder, or a standalone mental illness, the PACE Recovery is here to help.

Please contact us today to learn more about our evidence-based treatment center and the benefits of gender-specific therapies. We are available to answer your questions or begin the admissions process around the clock, 365 days a year. You can reach out to us today at 800-526-1851 to start the journey of addiction recovery.

Addiction Recovery: Peer-to-Peer Model

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Peer-to-peer support is the model of 12 Step recovery. And it works. So well, in fact, that practically every method of addiction recovery has been designed around that model. Since the 1930’s, Americans have been coming together to share their experience, strength and hope. Today, 12 Step programs are being utilized around the world saving lives in some of the most unlikely of places.

While peer-to-peer support is highly effective at helping people turn their lives around, it is not foolproof. Those who do not follow the suggestions of their peers, or put in the necessary work, are unlikely to succeed. If you have been a member Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous for even a short time, you understand. One old saying couldn’t be further from the truth: “It only works, if you work it.” Those who are willing to share their struggle and be receptive to feedback, and actually heed it, have a great shot at long term recovery.

So, why does it work so well? For one thing, addicts and alcoholics are not the most receptive to being told what to do. Even with time under one’s recovery belt, it can still be a real challenge (at times) to follow direction. However, those who attend AA and NA meetings are not exactly in need of advice. In many cases, they know the right answer to a given problem. No, what recovery members look for is shared experience. As opposed to giving advice, the recovery community shares with one another what worked for them similar situations. It is a method that does not make one feel admonished or patronized. On the other hand, you feel as though you are a part of something greater than yourself. A part of a fellowship that has a vested interest in your success.

Peer-to-Peer Addiction Recovery

Today, there is hardly a town that does not have some form of 12 Step addiction recovery at one’s disposal. From large Alano Clubs in cities to the basements of small places of worship in rural America, 12 Step meetings can be accessed. For the majority of Americans, getting to a meeting is not a difficult matter. Although, and to be fair, there are some Americans who must drive long distances to access recovery support groups. There are others, still, that are leery about going to a meeting in their hometown. The fear of social stigma is still quite strong.

People who are new to recovery often have a hard time believing that their anonymity will be honored in such environs. Trusting that what they say in the “rooms” will stay in the room. Which makes sense, people who are newly clean and sober are not the most trusting. Until finding recovery their life has never given them cause to trust. The world of active addiction is one of manipulation and deceit. If you are new to recovery, please understand that recovery is the antithesis of addiction. What was true to the realm of addiction is the exact opposite in recovery. Ours is a fellowship of trust and respect.

The members of addiction recovery programs have no hidden agendas. No interest in disseminating personal information about another member. What we do have is an expressed desire in paying it forward. Helping others stay clean and sober, which in turn helps us keep the recovery we have acquired. Recovery can’t be kept if one is unwilling to give it away—freely. Those willing to do the work — exercising compassion and respect for their fellow members — succeed.

Digital Addiction Recovery

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Despite what has been said about being honest, some may still struggle to walk into a room full of strangers. Especially with the aim of baring one’s soul and asking for guidance. There are, in fact, places in the world whose society discriminates against addicts and alcoholics heavily. Even if there were a brick and mortar place to sit with people and talk, many will hesitate. Which is one of the essential reasons Dan Blackman and Tyler Faux created a peer-to-peer support app called Huddle. A place where people with mental health disorders like addiction, depression and anxiety can connect, Business Insider reports. Huddle users can join online peer support groups anonymously.

If you live in New York, you can go to 10, 20 meetings a day if you wanted, because we have such density and such a low social taboo around talking about your feelings,” said Faux. “But in a lot of other places, and certainly in the rest of the world, that’s not the case.”

The idea to create the video peer-to-peer support app is personal to co-founder Dan Blackman. His father died from untreated alcohol use disorder in northwestern Pennsylvania, according to the article. Blackman says that there were not many options for people living with addiction or mental illness. Some people, like his father, fear seeking help because of blowback from the community. A fear that cost Blackman’s father his life. Huddle gives users control over how anonymous they want to be. Users can pixelate their face and have auto-generated username, if they like.

Recovery Reaches Further

It’s worth noting that not everyone using Huddle is anonymous, or new to the program. There are people in recovery with varying lengths of Time in the program. Some do not hide their faces. Which means that this could be a tool for, or an extension of one’s regular homegroup and weekly meetings. Perhaps when you are traveling or in rural areas. It is worth checking out, at the very least.

Are you a young man in need of addiction recovery? Do you feel that more than the going to meetings is needed, initially? PACE Recovery Center can help you stem the tide of active addiction and introduce you to recovery. We can show you how living a life in recovery is possible with the help of a fellowship. Please contact us today.

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