Tag Archives: National Recovery Month

National Recovery Month: Inspiring Hope

National Recovery Month

It's National Recovery Month 2019. During this time, the Gentlemen of PACE Recovery Center would like to celebrate the millions in recovery from addiction and mental health disorders. Recovery is a remarkable feat for numerous reasons. Sharing success stories can affect change in the lives of millions of people still in the grips of mental and behavioral health disorders.

If you are in recovery, then you should feel a sense of pride. It takes a tremendous amount of courage to practice what's needed each day to stay the course. Relapse is always a looming threat, regardless of how much time a person has acquired. Deciding each day to put recovery first is hard work, but the fruits of one's labor are invaluable.

Mental and behavioral health recovery fellowships and treatment centers are beacons of hope. They provide blueprints and guidelines that help people lead fulfilling and productive lives. They teach people how to achieve and maintain progress and how to have a positive impact on individuals and entire communities.

Millions of Americans and millions more around the world are active in the disease cycle. Many of them lose hope and convince themselves that sobriety and healing is an impossible dream. Those currently in recovery are proof that the exact opposite is true. Still, the onus falls on each person working a program to spread the message that a new way of life is possible.

Throughout September and beyond, each of us can play a role by sharing messages of hope. National Recovery Month provides a forum for men and women to share their experience, strength, and hope. At PACE Recovery Center, we encourage everyone to take part in this paramountly salient nationwide observance.

Be a Voice for Recovery During National Recovery Month

In the 30th year of National Recovery Month, the theme is Join the Voices for Recovery: Together We Are Stronger. Those who are presently taking steps to make daily progress know that working together is essential.

Addiction and mental illness thrive in solitude, but individual recovery is fueled by fellowship and community. Those who attempt to heal from mental and behavioral health disorders alone encounter significant difficulty.

Men and women require support and encouragement from others who share similar goals. Mental health disorders are too cunning, baffling, and power to be tackled alone.

Even though evidence-based treatments exist, many people have trouble reaching out for support. Such individuals may not be ready or are in denial about the severity of their problem. Whereas others fear seeking help because of social and professional repercussions—both real and imagined.

Stigma continues to present people with mental illness overwhelming challenges that prevent them from reaching out. Getting involved with National Recovery Month can help to counter the harmful effects of stigma. With that in mind, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is asking you to help be a voice for recovery.

If you feel comfortable, then please dedicate time to share your experience with the public. Doing so serves to educate the public about treatment and recovery. Those who Join the Voices for Recovery:

Help thousands of people from all walks of life find the path to hope, health, and personal growth.

Social Media and National Recovery Month Events

Spreading messages of hope is possible beyond sharing one's personal story. SAMHSA has created social media graphics and promotional materials that you are invited to share.

The National Recovery Month official sponsor also offers a downloadable toolkit to help guide individuals and organizations with their efforts to promote the benefits of recovery.

Over the course of September, more than 350 events are being held to support recovery efforts and encourage more people to seek help. What's more, the organization invites others to host events.

Recovery Month works to promote and support new evidence-based treatment and recovery practices, the emergence of a strong and proud recovery community, and the dedication of service providers and community members across the nation who make recovery in all its forms possible.

Reach Out for Addiction Recovery

National Recovery Month is an ideal opportunity to take steps for personal recovery. If you're an adult male living with an untreated mental or behavioral health disorder, then please contact PACE Recovery Center. Our team of highly trained and credentialed specialists works with men from all walks of life who struggle with mental illness and addiction.

We invite you to reach out today to learn more about our men's residential rehab programs. 800-526-1851

Recovery Month: Behavioral Health is Essential

recovery month

Last Friday, August 31, 2018, millions of people around the globe observed International Overdose Awareness Day. The goal of the annual event aims to raise awareness of overdose, reduce the stigma of a drug-related death, and remind everyone that overdose death is preventable. In 2017, more than 70,000 Americans died of an overdose; more than 60,000 in 2016; and, over 50,000 people died of drug toxicity in 2015. The rising death rate continues even though the overdose antidote naloxone is available, and efforts are underway to expand access to addiction treatment. While several initiatives and legislative measures are helping this most severe public health crisis, there is much more work that needs to happen.

One of the most effective ways to prevent overdose and save lives is through advocating for addiction recovery. Naloxone can reverse the effects of a toxic dose of heroin or oxycodone, but, long-term recovery is the surest way of avoiding the risk of overdose. A significant facet of last week’s day of awareness is acknowledging society’s need for putting an end to stigmatizing people who use drugs. If you saw anyone wearing a silver badge or purple wristband on Friday, such people were symbolizing their commitment to this most important subject matter.

It isn’t a secret that a significant percentage of Americans still look upon people who are in the grips of a use disorder unfavorably. Earlier this year, a survey by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research shined a light on stigma in America. A majority of Americans view drug addiction as a disease that requires treatment, but fewer than 1 in 5 are willing to closely associate with someone struggling with the condition, i.e., a friend, co-worker or neighbor.

National Recovery Month

The above poll is a clear indication of stigma’s dogged persistence. Most people understand that use disorder is a treatable medical condition, and yet only one-fifth want anything to do with such people. We don’t want to imply that stigma is as pervasive as it once was, we have come a long way; however, the only way to encourage more people to seek treatment and recovery is through destigmatization of the disease.

There are useful methods of bringing a higher number of individuals around to accepting addicts and alcoholics more humanely. For one, by highlighting the achievements of the millions of Americans who have reclaimed their lives in recovery. Each day, men and women across the nation wake up and recommit themselves to doing whatever it takes to stay clean and sober. Such persons are living examples of the possibility of recovery; acquiring decades of sobriety by following the direction of those who came before is a reality for many.

September is National Recovery Month! The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Association (SAMHSA) organizes events held across the United States to educate Americans about the benefits of addiction treatment. The organization works tirelessly to get the word out that mental health services can help men and women with a mental and substance use disorder live a productive and fulfilling life. And, they are asking for your help. Those in recovery and their families are invited to share the gains made by seeking treatment and working a program. If you are interested in getting involved, please follow the link; once there, you will find “Recovery Month tools, graphics, and resources to spread the positive message that behavioral health is essential to overall health, that prevention works, treatment is effective, and people can and do recover.”

Join the Voices for Recovery

Each year, SAMHSA chooses a theme for guiding local and national Recovery Month events. This year’s theme is “Join the Voices for Recovery: Invest in Health, Home, Purpose, and Community.” SAMHSA states:

The 2018 theme explores how integrated care, a strong community, sense of purpose, and leadership contributes to effective treatments that sustain the recovery of persons with mental and substance use disorders. The observance will work to highlight inspiring stories to help people from all walks of life find the path to hope, health, and wellness.”

Addiction Treatment

Recovery Month doesn’t just revolve around propping up people who have turned their lives around with the help of addiction recovery services. The observance is also about honoring the treatment and service providers who have, and continue to help, people from all walks of life find the miracle of recovery. The Gentlemen of PACE Recovery Center would like to commend the thousands of individuals who’ve dedicated their lives to helping others find the guiding light of addiction recovery. It is worth noting that a large percentage of people working in the field of mental health care are, in fact, in recovery themselves—paying it forward.

At PACE, we specialize in gender-specific addiction and mental health treatment services. If you are an adult male suffering from alcohol, substance use, or a co-occurring mental health disorder, please contact us today. We can help you begin making the changes necessary for a life of sustained recovery.

In Addiction Recovery Your Voice Matters

e plu·ri·bus u·num

ē ˌplo͝orəbəs ˈ(y)o͞onəm/ noun

  1. out of many, one
addiction

In addiction recovery we all have a Voice. It is a fact that no one should ever forget. While in the grips of this most progressive mental health disorder people find themselves mute. Sure, you can speak and be heard when in the cycle of addiction, at least superficially. But, for the most part what you have to say is generally ignored by society. The byproduct of decade after decade of continued disenfranchisement due to social stigma. Despite being an accepted mental health condition, much of society continues to view people with the disease differently. Especially when compared to other life-threatening illness.

Doctors, scientists and psychotherapists all agree that addiction can be treated given the opportunity. Yet, much of society still views use disorders as a moral failing or a lack of willpower. And it can be hard to blame such people. After all, those who have never felt the powerful gravitational pull of mind-altering substances are not likely to understand. Any more than an ambulatory person could understand someone who’s bound to a wheelchair. But, just because we’ve never walked in one’s shoes doesn’t mean that compassion and empathy can’t be exercised en masse.

At this time in American history, the need for compassion and understanding is paramount. Millions of people are currently on a collision course toward premature death. Despite the fact that their disease carries the possibility of recovery. Many of those still out there living in the self-defeating cycle of addiction are deterred from seeking recovery. Having been convinced that recovery is a pipedream. Believing that they are flawed and there is little hope for any kind of redemption from their decisions in life. It’s understandable, but it is a line of thinking that is in error.

Being the Voice of Addiction Recovery

It is probably fair to say that many people in recovery have been patiently awaiting the turn of the tide. A paradigm shift in thinking about addiction among society as a whole. Which is not far-fetched, considering the opioid addiction epidemic which has stolen the lives of people from every demographic. Over the last decade we have seen several lawmakers sing a different tune. Those who, historically, viewed addiction as a moral failing and drug use as a crime now see it differently. In some cases, their enlightenment came at a heavy cost, having lost someone dear to them. The silver lining being that more and more lawmakers are advocating for addiction treatment over jail.

However, even though addiction treatment services exist all over the country they are often underutilized. This is why it is vital that people in active addiction be encouraged to seek treatment. It is crucial that those with alcohol and substance use disorders be shown that recovery is attainable. Rather than wait for society to come around to this well-known fact, we the people in recovery can help. We can share our stories of recovery to inspire those still in the shadow of addiction. It is worth remembering that people in recovery are not a small demographic.

Everyday, millions of people around the globe work programs of continued recovery. People from all walks of life sharing the common bond of recovery. Everyone’s addiction and recovery is their own, to be shared about at their own discretion. One of the pillars of recovery being anonymity. Yet, that doesn’t mean that one can’t decide to share their experience of recovery with people not in the program. You just can’t share another person’s story. Your story belongs to you.

Join The Voices for Recovery

Stigma still exists, to be sure. There are those who would use such information of your illness against you, still to this day. But, that is becoming less and less a reality. We are not out of the woods yet, by any means, but slow progress is being made in that respect. Evolution aided by the realities of the addiction epidemic in America.

In recent years you may have noticed that greater numbers of people are choosing to talk about their disease. Not just at meetings, but at large. Using media as a tool to show that addiction can happen to anyone, you are eligible too (YET). Such people are not doing this for sympathy, they bravely share their story of recovery to encourage others. When people in the grips of addiction see that recovery is possible, they are more likely to seek help. Which is why during National Recovery Month, SAMHSA is urging people in recovery to do something courageous. This September, Join The Voices for Recovery to inspire change.

Out of many, one. By ourselves little change can be affected, together the voices of recovery can ripple across the country. Potentially inspiring countless people to do something courageous, like seek treatment. We realize that not everyone can, or feels comfortable sharing their story in a public forum. Particularly not in the biggest public forum ever conceived—the Internet. But, many of you do, and have so far. Over the last couple weeks people have been using their voice on YouTube and beyond to encourage others. It could be argued that young people in recovery can have the greatest impact. Their peers being some of the more difficult to sway toward treatment. Young people with addiction are often in denial, saying, ‘I’m not what addiction looks like.’ Often a fatal delusion.

In Recovery: I Am, Because of You

If you’d like to Join The Voices for Recovery, you can find information here. You can see an example below:


If you are having trouble watching, please click here.

All of us in recovery didn’t end up here by accident. Most of us resisted for years before being encouraged to seek help. Our story can only be told because others were there for us when we could not be there for ourselves. When we could not trust our own judgment. The fellowship took us in, when no one else would. Right now, thousands of young men battling opioid use disorder are at great risk of overdose. Encouraging such people to reach for recovery will in effect, help them save their own life.

If you are a young male who is ready to make the courageous choice of recovery, please contact PACE Recovery Center today. Recovery is possible and we can help you find it, and the gifts that come with the fellowship.

National Recovery Month – Join The Voices

National Recovery MonthTogether, we can, and do recover from addiction. Those who suffer from substance use disorder are not lost, but rather they are living with a debilitating mental health disorder which, left untreated, can be deadly. There was a time when recovering from addiction consisted of what is known as “white knuckling” it, that is when one gives up drugs and alcohol but has nothing to replace it with. Those who fell into that category were often considered to be a glum lot, angry about being unable to use mind altering substances the way “normal” people can. Suffice it to say, they are not considered fun to be around. The advent of 12-Step recovery programs was a paradigm shift with regard to breaking the cycle of addiction. To put it simply, those living with addiction had a metaphorical hole that alcohol and drugs filled; by working the 12-Steps people could fill that hole by connecting with a higher power and helping others find recovery. Naturally, there are 12-Steps for a reason, and recovery under that model requires working them all—and reworking them in order to maintain constant contact with the higher power of each person’s choosing. Sadly, some addicts and alcoholics are unable to be completely honest with themselves and others, and work a program; maybe they will be able to surrender down the road, but it does not always happen the first time around. For those who have been able to do the work, stick to the principles of recovery and help others—the sky’s the limit. There is no cap on the amount of gifts that a program of recovery can provide—sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. Everyone who continues to recover from drug and alcohol abuse, day in and day out, should take a moment to be proud of how far they have come—especially since National Recovery Month happens every September.

National Recovery Month

Over the last 27 years, September has been designated as National Recovery Month. Over the next 30 days there will be recovery related events held all over the United States with several different goals. Of top concern are efforts to break the stigma of addiction, which is a clinically accepted form of mental health disorder. What’s more, bringing to the attention of those still abusing drugs and alcohol that not only is help available, recovery is possible. By acknowledging and applauding the efforts of those who have managed to get and stay sober, we can encourage others to seek help. In 2016, the theme is Join the Voices for Recovery: Our Families, Our Stories, Our Recovery! Which, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), is about pointing out the value of family support throughout recovery.

Family Addiction and Family Recovery

Addiction is like a bomb. Ground-zero being the addict or alcoholic. And just like a bomb there is fallout, i.e. friends and family. Addiction can, and does, wreak havoc on the entire family. Recovery is as important for the person living with a substance use disorder, as it is for the family. National Recovery Month 2016 encourages individuals in recovery and their family to share their personal stories of heartache and successes in recovery they have made, with the hope that it will encourage others to seek the help they so desperately need. If you would like to Join the Voices of Recovery to help inspire others, please click here. If you would like to watch personal stories of recovery on Recovery Month's YouTube, please click here. Below is an example of one young man’s story: If you are having trouble viewing the video, please click here.

September is National Recovery Month

recovery-monthOrange County, California is well known for many things; such as its affluent communities and sandy beaches. It is also known for its large recovery community, being home to many substance use disorder treatment facilities, sober living homes and hundreds of 12-step recovery meetings held every week. People working programs of recovery make up a large part of the community; triangle and square stickers proudly adorn many a car bumper. While today and this month will be the same as yesterday and last month when it comes to working the principles of recovery, this month is a special time for many who are working a program or work in the field of addiction medicine. September is National Recovery Month, a time to recognize the countless people working towards living a healthy life - free from drugs and alcohol. If you would like to find a Recovery Month event in your area and learn more about local activities to support recovery efforts, click here. You are welcome to attend, even if you are not in recovery; the disease of addiction touches everyone in one way or another, when more people support the efforts of recovery it reduces the stigma that has long accompanied the illness. Recovery month is sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA), and if you are interested in hosting an event they have a number of tools at your disposal to guide you through the process. Use these tips, guidelines, and resources to help you plan your Recovery Month event: The President issued a Proclamation endorsing National Recovery Month, and it is worth reading in full:

NATIONAL ALCOHOL AND DRUG ADDICTION RECOVERY MONTH, 2015

- - - - - - -

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA A PROCLAMATION

Every day, resilient Americans with substance use disorders summon extraordinary courage and strength and commit to living healthy and productive lives through recovery. From big cities to small towns to Indian Country, substance use disorders affect the lives of millions of Americans. This month, we reaffirm our unwavering commitment to all those who are seeking or in need of treatment, and we recognize the key role families, friends, and health care providers play in supporting those on the path to a better tomorrow.

This year's theme is "Join the Voices for Recovery: Visible, Vocal, Valuable!" It encourages us all to do our part to eliminate negative public attitudes associated with substance use disorders and treatment. People in recovery are part of our communities -- they are our family and friends, colleagues and neighbors -- and by supporting them and raising awareness of the challenges they face, we can help eradicate prejudice and discrimination associated with substance use disorders, as well as with co-occurring mental disorders. Prevention and treatment work, and people recover -- and we must ensure all those seeking help feel empowered, encouraged, and confident in their ability to take control of their future. Americans looking for help for themselves or their loved ones can call 1-800-662-HELP or use the "Treatment Locator" tool at www.SAMHSA.gov.

My Administration remains dedicated to pursuing evidence-based strategies to address substance use disorders as part of our National Drug Control Strategy. Seeking to widen pathways to recovery, our strategy supports the integration of substance use treatment into primary health care settings and the expansion of support services in places such as high schools, institutions of higher education, and throughout the criminal justice system. In the wake of public health crises related to non-medical use of prescription drugs and heroin in communities across our Nation, my Administration has pledged considerable resources to help Federal, State, and local authorities boost prevention efforts, improve public health and safety, and increase access to treatment in communities across the country. And the Affordable Care Act has extended substance use disorder and mental health benefits and Federal parity protections to millions of Americans.

Behavioral health is essential to overall health, and recovery is a process through which individuals are able to improve their wellness, live increasingly self-directed lives, and strive to fulfill their greatest potential. During National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month, we reaffirm our belief that recovery and limitless opportunity are within reach of every single American battling substance use disorders, and we continue our work to achieve this reality.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 2015 as National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month. I call upon the people of the United States to observe this month with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand fifteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fortieth.

BARACK OBAMA

___________________________________________________________________________ If you or a loved one suffers from addiction, please contact Pace Recovery Center.

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