Tag Archives: positive attitude

Practicing Gratitude in Recovery Increases Positivity

practicing gratitude in recovery

In spite of the negative aspects of one’s life, a positive attitude changes everything. Especially in addiction recovery! Positivity, if harnessed, can be the force behind the sails of personal progress and healing on the turbulent seas of early recovery. Choosing to focus on the good, steers people away from dangers (i.e., triggers, cravings, and relapse) and toward calmer waters or serenity.

Practicing gratitude in recovery is an excellent method of singling out the good things in one’s life. When we recognize the people who helped make our recovery a possibility, for instance, it’s bound to elicit happy emotions. Even when one’s life is still in shambles, choosing to single out the things going right in life makes quotidian obstacles less stressful and more comfortable to overcome.

Staying present is a crucial ingredient to spotting beneficial elements of your life. Early in sobriety, people often become bogged down in memories of past mistakes. The things one has no power to change should not take center stage when one is on a mission to recover. Living in the moment, as best you can, brings everything worthwhile front and center. On the other end of the spectrum, those who always think about the tomorrows yet to come, risk missing something of importance now.

Individuals in recovery, even relative newcomers, already have so much to be thankful for today. Alcohol, substance use disorder, and coöccurring mental illness(es) are progressive, life-threatening diseases. Not everyone makes it to the rooms of recovery; it is sad and unfortunate because each person has the potential to heal. The mere fact that you are taking steps to improve your life should never be discounted or minimized. Men and women working a program, at any stage, can find uplifting things to think about moving forward.

A Daily Gratitude Journal

Transitioning into more positive modes of being will take practice. Change is a slow process; progress can be hard to see. Keeping a gratitude journal is one technique that people in recovery can utilize.

Positive experiences, while beneficial, are often fleeting; they can pass by without you having had the opportunity to acknowledge their significance. Setting aside a few minutes each day to compile a list of the people, places, and things that aid your recovery can help. Having a journal you can refer to when you are feeling down is also extremely beneficial.

Dr. Judith T. Moskowitz, a psychologist at Northwestern University, recently shared some thoughts about gratitude with the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Moskowitz et al. study how keeping a daily gratitude journal affects stress relief and overall health. She contends that practicing gratitude is a skill that can help some people increase their positivity, and improve their mental health.

By practicing these skills, it will help you cope better with whatever you have to cope with,” Moskowitz explains to NIH: News in Health. “You don’t have to be experiencing major life stress. It also works with the daily stress that we all deal with. Ultimately, it can help you be not just happier but also healthier.”

Making gratitude a habit is not a panacea; it works best in conjunction with other wellness tools. Moreover, it may not make everyone feel better or rid some people of negativity. Dr. Moskowitz points out that meditating and doing small acts of kindness are other tools at people’s disposal.

Being more mindful can increase one’s overall feelings of positivity. In conclusion, the next time something happens that uplifts your spirit, write it down. Acknowledge it, save it for later; gratitude will help you down the road.

A Positive Attitude Changes Everything in Recovery

At PACE Recovery Center, we firmly believe that a Positive Attitude Changes Everything (PACE). Our team helps men, struggling with mental illness, identify their specific recovery goals, and empowers them to achieve their dreams.

We offer gender-specific programs in a safe, sober, and supportive environment. Please contact us at your earliest convenience to learn more about our services and how we can help your or family member foster long term recovery.

Addiction Recovery Comes First On Holidays

addiction recovery

Last week, we wrote at length about people in addiction recovery making flexible and adjustable resolutions. We also included a brief section about observing major holidays as one might any other day of the year. It is critical to avoid giving specific days of the year more power than they deserve. Stress and emotional turmoil can accompany holidays, but such feelings should not be an excuse to use drugs and alcohol.

Christmas is drawing near, and New Year's Eve is close behind. It is vital to go over some techniques for keeping your recovery intact into 2019. Each person working a program of recovery has tools at their disposal for coping with trying situations. For many people, being around family can precipitate mental strain. Fortunately, individuals who practice the principles of recovery can make it through any holiday.

Conversely, some individuals whose families are not currently a part of their lives are prone to melancholy. Active addiction steals much from a person. The choices one makes in service to their disease can result in familial estrangement. Having the knowledge that you are not welcome at a holiday gathering can lead to mental fatigue. Such people are more apt to start feeling sorry for themselves and are at a heightened risk of experiencing problems.

Protecting Your Addiction Recovery During The Holidays

Each individual in addiction recovery has different life circumstances, and nothing is set in stone. Recovering addicts' lives change regularly. One must do their best to manage and cope with family-induced stress or loneliness. It's possible to avoid recovery pitfalls during Christmas and New Year's, and your support network can help. Those who stay close to their circle and are honest about their limitations can stay on track. Below you will find some helpful tips for preventing relapse this Christmas and New Year's Eve.

First, develop tactics for attending family gatherings. Also, have a plan for weathering the blues that can come from not being in the company of relatives. A strategy for either for each must include attending meetings of recovery. Groups are held around the clock during every significant holiday. Prioritize catching a meeting both before and after attending family events. Those who are not expected at the Christmas dinner can use the free time to be in the company of recovery peers. People in addiction recovery will often host sober holiday gatherings, too. It is imperative to ask around and find ways to fill your holiday schedule.

Second, the holiday season is notorious for overeating and lounging around the house. Prioritizing self-care is helpful. People in recovery can never lose sight of the importance of maintaining their spiritual and physical exercise routines. Addiction recovery is about balance, and prayer and meditation help keep one's equilibrium. Individuals who exercise daily can benefit from finding time for light exercise on Christmas. Not giving certain days of the year power means sticking to one's normal recovery routine as much as possible.

Positive Attitude Changes Everything

Each person is at a different point in addiction recovery. Meaning, some people may not yet be where they want to be. The gifts of uninterrupted sobriety, after all, come when the time is right—not a moment sooner. In the meantime, it is essential to maintain a positive attitude regardless of having family in your life or not.

Those not yet where they would like to be in life can take comfort in recognizing the progress made thus far. Each day clean and sober is a source of pride. People in their first year of sobriety should be able to easily remember how unfortunate life was just a short time ago. The coming holidays may not look the way one hopes, but it will seem significantly better than what would be without recovery.

Whatever one's schedule looks like on December 25th or 31st, family time or not, everything will be copacetic if you keep doing the next right thing for your addiction recovery throughout the day. Remind yourself of the importance of maintaining an open mind. Be accepting of those around you and minimize expectations. Most importantly, remember that a positive attitude changes everything.

Christmas is a season for kindling the fire for hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.” ―Washington Irving

The Gentlemen of PACE Recovery Center would like to wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. We are hopeful that people in recovery will practice the principles and utilize their toolbox for a safe and sober holiday. Please contact us if you require assistance for alcohol or substance use disorder.

Recovery: Attitude Changes Everything

recovery

Attitude can make or break a person’s recovery! Those who fixate on the negative aspects of their life – there are often many in early recovery – are at a significant disadvantage. Conversely, individuals who do everything in their power to find the positive in every situation find themselves more able to stay on track. As we say here at PACE Recovery Center, Positive Attitude Changes Everything.

It is not uncomplicated to find upsides in one’s life in the beginning; guilt and shame are known to accompany early sobriety. When the thick haze of active addiction first settles the wreckage of the past is usually overwhelming. People begin to see the real impact their mental illness has not just in their life but also the lives of those they love when the dust settles after entering treatment. For most, looking at the big picture of addiction is extremely painful; some may find looking in the mirror too much to handle, at first.

Coming to terms with where your life is when recovery is in its infancy could be compared to an emotional rollercoaster. On the one hand, you have the elation that comes with making the courageous decision to address your disease. On the other, there is the reality that putting down the drugs and alcohol may be the least laborious aspect of one’s recovery; clients quickly learn that they will have to face their feelings and delve into the underlying issues of addiction to achieve their goals.

Treatment and working a daily program of recovery asks much of an individual, but each person can take comfort in knowing that they are not alone. Unlike the experience of active alcohol and substance use, you can take pleasure in knowing that you have support today. Some days will be remarkably difficult and maintaining a positive attitude will make all the difference. When a man sets a course for recovery, he comes to realize that his line of thinking can hinder progress.

Searching for Positivity in Recovery

Once detoxification is complete, the mind is clearer which can reveal some unwelcome aspects about oneself. A person has to contend with the outcome of leading the kind of life they once lived before finding treatment, and face – perhaps for the first time – some of the fallout. Simply put, most find it hard to move the facial muscles into the shape of a smile in early recovery and for understandable reasons. However, it is paramount that such men do not let the upsets of their past prognosticate the future.

Each person in long-term recovery was once a newcomer, and they had to make sense of the same types of realizations that those new to the program are wrestling with presently. The mere fact that they were able to skirt the pitfalls of early sobriety can serve as a source of comfort and hope that how you feel today will pass. If you remind yourself that feelings are not facts and that ‘this too shall pass,’ lasting recovery is possible; but, it is paramount that you surround yourself with positive people. Optimism is a guiding force in recovery and sticking close to the people you meet in the program with good attitudes will help you find the strength to spurn negativity.

Some who work a program swear by the aphorism, “fake it till you make it;” in recovery circles, the statement may be held as a platitude, one that you will hear much over the years. Essentially, the above saying suggests that those who imitate confidence and optimism will one day realize such qualities in himself. Simply put, smiling even when you think there is nothing to smile about can have a beneficial impact on your behaviors. Give it a try; you may be surprised.

Tips for Positive Outlook

A good many people new to the program believe they have deficits that need to be addressed. Some are out of work, while others have lost their license due to a DUI. There are those whose families are no longer conversing with them, and it will take time for their loved ones to notice the changes afoot. Still, others are in debt from years or decades of financial mismanagement; the list can go on and on, but what is missing from one’s life is not the salient matter. What’s essential in the first months of recovery is learning to live life on life’s terms and incorporating the principles of the program into everyday life.

Developing life skills in place of self-defeating behaviors allows people to address all the negative aspects of life leftover from the past when the time is right. Learning what it means to be responsible for your actions and accountable to others is a means of affecting the changes men and women desire.

Take stock of the small milestones each day as you plot a course to your broader goals. Each day that doesn’t involve drugs or alcohol is worth being proud about and may even result in a wave of joy, ride it.

Gratitude is an excellent way to improve your outlook. Be grateful for the things you possess right now, and for some of the things that you lack for they give you something to work towards. Tell those who are helpful to you how thankful you are to have their support. Do something kind, even a minute gesture of kindness, can go along way; when you make another person’s day better, you benefit too. Pay it forward!

No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. – Aesop

Positive Changes

Please contact PACE Recovery Center if drugs and alcohol have made your life unmanageable. Our team can assist you in achieving your goals with the help of evidence-based therapies. We offer a safe, sober and supportive environment for making positive changes in your life. We are available at any time to field any questions you have about our program.

It is our great pleasure to be part of your incredible journey into recovery.

Sobriety: Making Positive Life Changes

sobriety

Aside from being a highly acclaimed novella by Franz Kafka, metamorphosis is also a word that holds particular significance for people transforming their lives via programs of addiction recovery. A definition of the noun states a change of the form or nature of a thing or person into an entirely different one, by natural or supernatural means. If that doesn’t nicely sum up sobriety, and the effect it can have on an individual’s life, then what does?

If you read the novel in school or for leisure, you probably remember that at its heart the story is about a man’s struggle for existence. If you are in recovery, you don’t have to read Kafka’s works to understand how arduous altering a single solitary thing in one’s life can be, let alone changing everything. Recovery demands a paradigm shift in thinking, or to steal a line from an even more relevant book, donning “A New Pair of Glasses.” Committing oneself to a program of long-term sobriety gives people a different perception; when the fog of alcohol and drugs lifts, you see things with clarity. When you work a program, it can completely alter your perspective, attitude, and it allows for continual growth in positive directions. A true metamorphosis, in every sense of the word!

With active drug and alcohol use behind us, we choose engagement over isolation. When Self is no longer harboring illusions of total control, one can develop a relationship with something higher. And, that something – while different for each of us – guides us both inside and out toward making the next right decision. In recovery, people have the tools to face their problems with a positive attitude; rather than recoiling from life’s curveballs, we take action. Positive Attitude Changes Everything!

Starting Over In Recovery

Nobody can deny that changing the people, places, and things in life is a difficult task. Even more challenging, is that individuals in recovery also have to change how they look at just about everything. Gone are the days of feeling sorry for one’s self; it is no longer OK to hold other people responsible for how life is today. Recovery teaches us that we have to take responsibility for our decisions and be accountable for the outcome of our choices. Equally vital, placing emphasis on staying accountable to others.

For many people new to working a program, there comes the realization that they cannot take this journey alone—just one of many critical epiphanies. When the seed of recovery is germinating, individuals have the awareness that the way life was before is no longer tenable. One must be present today, always making an effort to connect with men and women in their support network. Such people have to strive to be of service to others; individual sobriety is not mutually exclusive from collective recovery.

Early on in the quest for sobriety, men and women have to come to terms with the fact that life will never be the same. People who you once considered friends and allies, start looking decidedly less so; if recovery is to grow, pruning some of the underbrush of one’s past is a must. People’s environments need to change too; in recovery, going to a bar to catch up with friends isn’t safe. Engaging in activities that are inextricably connected to past substance use often have to go as well. In some cases, that includes places of employment.

Journey to Sobriety

While we specialize in working with men at PACE Recovery Center, there is much wisdom that we can glean from women taking the journey to sobriety. Author Kristi Coulter made a critical decision recently about the line of work she was in; a choice which many men in recovery can probably relate. Before she earned recognition for writing about her life sober, Coulter held several executive positions with Amazon. Kristi held jobs that many people could only dream of, which is why it may come as a surprise that last February Coulter quit working in the tech sector. Now, she is thoroughly committed to writing about the new quest she is on—sobriety.

Coulter got sober in 2013. Since then she has documented her life on her blog, Off-Dry, Seattle Magazine reports. With five years free from alcohol under her belt, she published a collection of essays titled "Nothing Good Can Come from This" (released August 7). She tells Woolfer in an interview that the book is about “what happens when a high-achieving, deeply unhappy fortysomething woman gives up the ‘one’ thing she really thinks she can’t live without–wine–and has to remake her entire sense of self from the ground up.” She talks about working in the high-stress tech-sector, about how alcohol use and addiction is pervasive in the industry. Like many people new to sobriety, she began penning her thoughts. An essay that she wrote was picked up and led to a book deal. Coulter says she hopes her writing will inspire others to confront their relationship with substances.

I’d love for people to think, ‘What would my life be like after I got rid of the thing that I know I don’t need but [that] I can’t seem to walk away from?’”

Addiction Recovery

At PACE, we take a dynamic approach to our men's addiction and mental health treatment program. We help clients face the underlying issues of their condition(s) and teach men how to discard self-defeating behaviors and adopt attitudes of positivity. Please contact us to learn more about how we can make the dream of recovery your long-term reality.

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