Tag Archives: positive attitude

Addiction Recovery: A Positive Attitude Helps You

addiction recovery

As 2020 winds down, it may be challenging to look back without a sense of melancholy. Nearly one million people have died thus far worldwide; tens of millions have contracted COVID-19. Many members of the addiction recovery community have come face to face with the novel illness.

You may know someone who has contracted the coronavirus or passed away. If so: our thoughts and prayers go out to you. We also hope that your well-being and program have not been compromised owing to grief and mourning.

COVID-19 has tested and continues to test the addiction recovery fellowship. Not long ago, it would have been hard to imagine that millions of people in recovery would forgo in-person meetings for a digital option. Who could have dreamt that an untold number of men and women seeking a new way of life would attend their first 12 Step meeting via video conferencing?

Fortunately, members of the community have banded together for the common cause of recovery. You continue to meet the day by carrying the message (online) to alcoholics who still suffer—those unable to cope with the “slings and arrows of outrageous fortune.”

It’s comforting to know that the hands of programs like Alcoholics Anonymous remain open to the newcomer. The new normal is far from ideal but there is a solution to be found. Support is always there for those who need it, including any one of the untold number of individuals who relapsed recently. Knowing that they still have an outlet to reconnect with the fellowship is uplifting.

Positivity: A Gift from Recovery

Undoubtedly, the last several months were taxing, and many have found cause to despair. Risk of contraction, mass layoffs, financial insecurity, and divisive sentiments come to mind when looking backward and presently. However, you have the power to decide how you perceive what is happening. You can choose to zero-in on life with a negative lens, or you can single out what’s positive today.

There is much to be grateful for of late. The tens of thousands of men and women in the field of medicine are a perfect example. It’s challenging to overlook their heroic acts—tending to and treating the millions of people impacted by the coronavirus. Every day, such individuals put on a face mask and go into the trenches to care for the infected. Remember that their selfless acts could have fatal consequences, but they suit up each day regardless of the risks.

The heroes of medicine are just one of the myriad examples of greatness shining today. We implore you to recognize the many beacons of hope lighting your surroundings. Observing acts of kindness is empowering and can inspire you to continue reaching out your hand to others. There is a comfort to be had in the realization that we are all in this together.

September is National Recovery Month: a time to acknowledge the gains made by millions of people across the country. It’s uplifting to remind yourself of the gifts that working a program gives to people. Commitment pays off; just about anything is possible and achievable in recovery.

Even those with a shorter length of sobriety – those in early recovery – quickly see their lives improve before their eyes. Recovery gives individuals the tools to be free from self-defeating and negative states of mind. With a positive outlook, one can seize the day.

A Positive Life in Addiction Recovery

If the pandemic has impacted your life and you have had difficulty seeing the bright side of late, please do not be discouraged. You do not have to work through your challenges alone. What’s more, it’s beneficial to discuss your hardships with your peers. The addiction recovery fellowship is always there when one needs it most.

Keeping negative thoughts to yourself will only serve to worsen an already challenging situation. Sharing what you are going through with others will help you. It will also help others who are experiencing similar hardships. Moreover, the feedback of others will quickly remind you that you are not alone. Knowing that others care will help you put negativity to bed and foster a positive attitude.

A Positive Attitude Changes Everything! Remember, if you still have your recovery, you still have much to be grateful for today. If you decide to harness the power of positivity, it will be easier to get through darker days. Take stock in the gains you make, no matter how small.

Recognize the milestones you make in recovery; getting through another day sober is a monumental achievement if you choose to see it that way. You can get through any challenge without drugs and alcohol in your life. This September, take time to celebrate the gains you’ve made in recovery—it will strengthen your resolve for continued progress.

Our chief want is someone who will inspire us to be what we know we could be.” –Ralph Waldo Emerson–

Gender-Specific Treatment Center for Men

PACE Recovery Center offers gender-specific addiction recovery programs for men. Please contact us today to learn more about our center and the evidence-based therapies we utilize. Our highly skilled team of professionals can help you begin a remarkable journey and set you on a path to leading a positive and fulfilling life in recovery.

Depression and Anxiety During COVID-19 Pandemic

depression

Are you feeling angry, discontent, frustrated, lonely, and stir crazy? Are you consumed by fear of the unknown and bogged down by states of anxiety or depression? If the words above resonate, aptly describing your sentiments of late, please know that you are not alone. The majority of people in recovery from addiction, mental illness, or dual diagnosis feel the same way. We implore you; take stock in remembering that this too shall pass.

It’s been several months since we learned that a deadly virus found its way ashore in America. A short time ago, we couldn’t have imagined that the United States would become the epicenter of the most severe public health crisis in 100 years. Moreover, we didn’t know that life as we know it would change immeasurably. Nevertheless, here we find ourselves; all 328 million-plus of us.

COVID-19 is a deadly coronavirus sweeping across America. From Miami to Seattle, from Bangor to Huntington Beach, more than three and half million have tested positive. What’s more, 135,000 Americans‘ lives have been cut short. Each day, the death toll and the number of cases rises; it’s understandable that you have concerns. A pandemic is an unprecedented event for 99.99 percent of those living; there isn’t a playbook to turn to for guidance.

While we shelter in place waiting for the storm to pass, it can be easy to become trapped in the endless news cycle. Headlines are informative to be sure, but they are also troubling. Acting on instructions to change behaviors reduces disease transmission and also flips our lives upside down.

Pandemic-Related Relapse

We are all trying to get through each day without resorting to self-defeating and self-destructive behaviors to cope. In the process, we must acknowledge that the pandemic will have a lasting impact on society long after scientists develop a vaccine.

In our last post, we pointed out that a third of Americans are showing signs of clinical depression and anxiety. Alcohol use is surging; the same is valid for drugs. According to the Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Dr. Nora Volkow, since the COVID-19 pandemic began, opioid overdoses may have increased 30 to 40 percent. She adds:

We know also that from some of the reports from the states that there have been increases in overdose fatalities, that there have been increases in patients relapsing that had already achieved recovery. So we are hearing these distress calls from throughout the country.”

If you live in a state hit hard by the coronavirus, you may be cut off from your support network. The only meetings of recovery you attend may be virtual. Hopefully, you’ve managed to stay on course toward progress despite the new normal. It’s not easy to keep your recovery intact in isolation, but it’s possible.

Fortunately, there are still resources at your disposal, even if they come from afar. Continue to practice the principles in all your affairs to get to the other side of this public health crisis without incident. The program teaches us that we have to live life on life’s terms to succeed; never have such words rang so true. In recovery, you are informed that anything can be overcome, provided you remember where you came from, and don’t lose sight of where you would like to go.

The Spell of Depression

It’s challenging to maintain a positive outlook when stuck at home and racked with concern. It’s possible to practice positivity, but a positive attitude is contingent on our behaviors; how you fill your day matters. Spending your days without purpose or in an unproductive manner will impact your well-being.

If depression and anxiety weigh you down, please talk to your peers or a professional about your feelings. Identify behaviors contributing to how you feel and make alterations as necessary. For instance, make daily walks a priority if you are feeling sedentary. Instead of binging too much Netflix, read more.

Books will transport you away from your negative thoughts. Memoirs and mindful texts abound, and there is no time like the present to check off boxes on your recovery reading list. If you are struggling with depression, you may be interested in a new book on the subject.

Essayist and literary critic, George Scialabba, has battled depression for decades. His latest text gives readers an up-close and personal look at the condition. Scialabba’s How To Be Depressed also provides those who contend with depression some helpful tools. The University of Pennsylvania Press writes:

Unlike heart surgery or a broken leg, there is no relaxing convalescence and nothing to be learned (except, perhaps, who your friends are). It leaves you weakened and bewildered, unsure why you got sick or how you got well, praying that it never happens again but certain that it will. Scialabba documents his own struggles and draws from the insights that may prove useful to fellow-sufferers and general readers alike. In the place of dispensable banalities—”Hold on,” “You will feel better,” and so on—he offers an account of how it’s been for him, in the hope that doing so might prove helpful to others.”

Southern California Mental Health Treatment for Men

At PACE Recovery Center, we specialize in treating men suffering from mental illnesses like depression and anxiety. If you or a loved one struggles with a mental health disorder, our highly qualified team of specialists could help bring about lasting recovery. Please contact us today to begin the healing process.

Recovery: April is Stress Awareness Month 2020

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This March and April are arguably the most challenging months that people in recovery have faced in living history. Millions of people’s lives depend on constant contact with a mutual support network like Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A.) or Narcotics Anonymous (N.A.).

Being seen and seeing others reminds recovering individuals that they are not alone. Attending meetings is an outlet of accountability that keeps one on track toward continued progress.

The COVID-19 pandemic has flipped the world upside down; almost everything is different than a short time ago. Protecting your health and the well-being of others demands that we all “shelter in place,” practice social distancing, and use personal protective equipment (PPE).

We have no idea how long these protocols will continue. There are now 854,338 Americans infected with coronavirus; the nation is mourning the loss of 47,125 of our loved ones.

The restrictions imposed on the planet are stressful for each of us, but for those who rely on 12 Step meetings they are taking a nerve-racking toll. Countless people in recovery – regardless of their lengths of sobriety – are in a precarious position and must be more exacting than usual.

While some in-person meetings are still held across the country, people with pre-existing health conditions can’t risk exposure. A significant number of men and women in recovery fall into the above bracket. For such individuals, the internet and smartphones are the only access points to the recovery community.

Videoconferencing and teleconferencing are helpful, and we are lucky such tools exist. However, protracted in-person isolation takes a traumatic toll on a group of people whose program can be compromised by seclusion. Quarantine is stressful and frustrating; if the pressure builds up and isn’t released in a healthy way, the outcome could be a relapse.

Stress Awareness Month 2020

It’s both fitting and ironic that April happens to be Stress Awareness Month. April is always stressful because of taxes. Fortunately, the IRS has extended the deadline for paying taxes to July 15th. While forking over your savings to the IRS is worrisome, it pales in comparison to the fear of contracting a deadly virus.

Stress Awareness Month has been held every April since 1992. The goal of the annual observance is to help people learn how to cope with stress in non-destructive ways. De-stressing is a target that each person in recovery must focus on, perhaps now more than ever.

Just shy of one year ago, a survey showed that Americans were among the most stressed-out people in the world. The Gallup 2019 Global Emotions Report indicated that in 2018 men and women in the United States reported feeling stress, anger, and worry at the highest levels in a decade.

What really stood out for the U.S. is the increase in the negative experiences,” Julie Ray, Gallup’s managing editor for world news, told The New York Times. “This was kind of a surprise to us when we saw the numbers head in this direction.”

Gallup asked survey participants about how they felt in the previous day:

  • 55 percent of Americans reported experiencing stress during a lot of the day.
  • 45 percent felt worried a lot.
  • 22 percent – more than one in five – felt angry a lot.

Naturally, maintaining a positive attitude during this unprecedented event is no small hurdle. Nevertheless, you cannot afford to let the new normal of isolation jeopardize your program of recovery. There are many techniques for enhancing your positivity while sheltering in place.

Keeping Stress at Bay in Recovery

At PACE Recovery Center, we would like to remind you that a positive attitude changes everything (PACE). You have the power to maintain a positive outlook, even during a pandemic.

Your recovery must always come first; call your sponsor and peers in your “deep bench” of support regularly. Attend meetings via the internet. Read recovery related materials and find ways to have fun at home.

If you find yourself becoming overly stressed, try to silence your mind. Meditation is an effective way to bring yourself back to a state of serenity. Exercise is another means of combating anxiety, worries, and pressure.

Being cooped up will ultimately lead to feeling stir crazy. Get outside and take at least a 30-minute walk every day. If you don’t have physical limitations, then go for a bicycle ride or a jog. It’s worth noting that you don’t need to go to a gym to work out, nor do you require workout equipment at home. Pushups, sit-ups, and yoga can keep you physically fit and reduce your stress levels.

Any of the above suggestions can help you stay positive despite the pandemic. Staying positive will protect your recovery and keep your program intact until the storm passes.

Addiction Recovery Center for Men

One of the unfortunate byproducts of “stay at home” orders is that Americans are drinking and drugging at elevated rates. Moreover, these arduous past couples of months have impacted members of the recovery community significantly and led to many relapses.

If you relapsed, please get back on track before your situation worsens. It’s possible that you require professional assistance to get back on the road to lasting recovery. We invite adult males who are struggling with mental health and behavioral health problems like depression or addiction to contact us today.

PACE Recovery Center offers gender-specific recovery programs and services for men. Please reach out to us today to learn more and begin the healing process. Our dedicated team of physicians, doctorate-level clinicians, and master-level therapists are following all COVID-19 protocols for protecting our clients.

Addiction Recovery Aided by Your Creativity

addiction recovery

More than 100,000 people will likely have succumbed to the COVID-19 pandemic by the end of the day worldwide. In the United States, 485,451 Americans have confirmed cases of the coronavirus; each day, the number of new cases increases exponentially. As such, the need for people in addiction recovery to continue social distancing and sheltering in place remains a fact of life.

Last week, we discussed the importance of making productive use of your downtime. If you do, then you are better able to maintain a positive attitude during this challenging time. As we like to point out frequently, a positive attitude changes everything for men and women in the addiction recovery community.

Staying positive is not an easy feat to accomplish, especially when you consider the number of people in recovery out of work. In the last three weeks, more than 17 million Americans have filed for unemployment. It’s fair to say that most individuals in early recovery held non-essential positions, which means that those most vulnerable to relapse are now jobless.

Unemployed and unable to connect face-to-face with one’s support network can bring about negative thoughts. Feeling down and out can tempt you to want to find relief in unhealthy ways. If you are experiencing “stinking thinking,” then please play the tape forward and reach out to a peer or sponsor. Alcohol and drugs will not make your current situation any better.

The “Stay at Home” order in California isn’t fun for anyone, but you can make the best of it by getting creative. Reading, writing, playing an instrument, painting, puzzling, and making gratitude lists will keep your mind occupied and lift your spirits.

Creativity Boosts and Strengthens Your Addiction Recovery

Over the last few weeks, you’ve probably spent some time on the internet. Aside from attending online 12 Step meetings, YouTube is an excellent resource for finding ways to be creative in addiction recovery.

It’s an excellent time to pick up a new hobby or return to an activity you used to enjoy but had trouble finding the time. We have an overabundance of disposable time, finding excuses for not engaging in hobbies is challenging.

While this youngster isn’t in recovery, he rewrote the lyrics to a classic Leonard Cohen song made famous by Jeff Buckley. In response to the 5th grader @awesome_dudes_adventure’s difficulties with a video conferencing platform, he decided he would creatively voice his frustrations to the song “Hallelujah.” Please watch the video below:


If you are having trouble watching, please click here.

The video is both amusing and an excellent example of how you can get creative while continuing to work a program of addiction recovery. Those who are not musically or artistically inclined can seek out other ways to help maintain a positive attitude. Scour the internet for suggestions or unique hobbies that you can adopt; there is a lot out there on how to keep busy amid a pandemic.

Staying Positive Helps You Avoid Despair

If you are committed to staying busy in between your daily online meetings and step work, then you will find it much easier to maintain positive thoughts. It’s also vital to prioritize spirituality and healthy living; doing so will help you find serenity.

Meditation, yoga, and daily walks are examples of methods for staying serene while social distancing. Since the post office is still distributing parcels, you might find it fun to write letters to friends and family even if they are right down the road. When was the last time you wrote a letter by hand? Moreover, receiving an envelope from a friend will put a smile on your face.

The goal is avoiding idle time, especially if you are in early recovery and are not yet comfortable in your head. Seeking out ways to get out of yourself and engage your mind will prove to be extremely beneficial. Watching videos of uplifting, positive stories can also help you stay positive:


If you are having trouble watching, please click here.

Addiction and Mental Illness Recovery Center

Do you require assistance with alcohol use disorder, substance use disorder, co-occurring disorder, or mental illness? If you are an adult male who is struggling, then PACE can help you chart a course toward lasting recovery. Please contact us today.

At PACE Recovery Center, we would like to wish everyone a Happy Easter and Passover. We understand that gathering with family members may not be possible for millions of people. However, you can utilize general video conferencing platforms to share in the festivities from afar.

Addiction and Sadness Connection: Emotions and Addictive Behaviors

addiction

Positive emotions are beneficial for people in recovery; whereas, negative emotions derail one’s program and can lead to relapse. At PACE, we fully subscribe to the power of positivity and its impact on lasting addiction recovery. While we understand that life can be difficult, and challenges can elicit negative feelings, each of us has the power to alter our perspective and move forward productively.

At the core of addictive behaviors are several negative sentiments such as guilt, shame, self-loathing, disgust, anger, sadness, and fear. Some addiction specialists argue that the latter state of being is the crux of addiction. Those who hope to break free from addiction must work tirelessly not to let negative emotions run their lives.

It’s hard to see the sunny side of life when you are in the grips of despair, but no matter how dark your reality appears, there is always hope. Life doesn’t have to be the way it is always, and we humans have an enormous capacity for change both internally and externally. Right now, millions of people around the globe are leading healthy and positive lives in recovery, which means that you can too.

The road to a more positive life is not without potholes, and everyone stumbles from time to time. Still, it’s not the falling that matters; it’s the getting back up and trudging forward and never losing sight of your goals.

Even people with years of sobriety have less than ideal days. A myriad of factors can jeopardize one’s serenity, such as a death in the family or loss of employment, for example. Bad days are normal, but wallowing in misfortune is not, nor is it healthy—especially for people in recovery.

On this blog, we like to discuss the power of positivity on a regular basis; we believe it’s helpful for those in early recovery. The first year of sobriety is a rollercoaster ride of emotions – some good and some bad – and it’s vital not to let the latter take over. It’s easier said than done, but with a support network by your side, you can overcome any obstacle and the accompanying negative emotions.

Sadness In Early Recovery

Learning how to cope with negative emotions is something that many people discover in treatment. It’s vital to have such skills because negative emotions will crop up without warning and must be addressed immediately. One of the more common emotions that people in early recovery contend with is sadness.

You can be sad for a number of reasons. Men and women in early recovery are often consumed by regret. When the fog of drugs and alcohol clears, many have a propensity to look back on their using tenure with sadness. Some will even mourn the loss of the drugs and alcohol, even though they understand that such substances were detrimental.

If you find yourself in a funk and are feeling down, then it’s vital to take action and talk to someone you trust immediately. Such emotions can spread through the mind like wildfire, and the smoke created will cloud your vision for the future.

Always remember that the past is behind you and that you only have the power to change what you do today. Dwelling on the past and breathing air into negative feelings can lead you down a destructive path. It turns out that sadness is an emotion that researchers associate with addictive behaviors.

Sadness and Addictive Substance Use

A new study that mainly focuses on the use of cigarettes could also shed light on all addictive behaviors. Researchers from Harvard University sought to determine which role emotions play in addictive behavior. The findings – appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences – indicate that sadness plays a significant part in triggering addictive behaviors.

The researchers examined four studies which all reinforce the finding that sadness leads to cravings more than any other negative emotion, according to the Harvard Kennedy School. The team believes that their results could help in designing more effective prevention campaigns.

The conventional wisdom in the field was that any type of negative feelings, whether it’s anger, disgust, stress, sadness, fear, or shame, would make individuals more likely to use an addictive drug,” said lead researcher Charles A. Dorison, a Harvard Kennedy School doctoral candidate. “Our work suggests that the reality is much more nuanced than the idea of ‘feel bad, smoke more.’ Specifically, we find that sadness appears to be an especially potent trigger of addictive substance use.”

Gender-Specific Addiction and Mental Health Treatment

Adult males are invited to reach out to PACE Recovery Center to learn more about our evidence-based therapies for the treatment of addiction and mental illness. We offer specialized clinical treatment tracks to address all components of addiction and mental health. If you are struggling with alcohol, drugs, or a mental health disorder, our team of highly trained professionals can help you achieve lasting recovery.

Recovery Writing: Keeping a Journal Improves Your Mental Health

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Mental health and physical health are of the utmost importance to people in addiction recovery. Anything you can do to boost your mental wellbeing and physical fitness will significantly improve your outlook on life. In recovery, a positive attitude changes everything.

Improving your physical health usually comes down to introducing exercise and a healthy diet into your schedule. If you completed an addiction treatment program, then you were probably advised to prioritize healthy living.

It’s likely that your counselors and clinicians shared with you the benefits of eating right and physical fitness. They probably explained that physical health and mental health are linked. Since people in early recovery are healing, they must do whatever they can to expedite the healing process.

Hopefully, you make a point of eating healthy foods and exercising three to five times a week. The latter does not require that you go to the gym; daily 30-minute walks can go a long way towards improving your fitness. Those who make fitness a priority feel better and thus are better able to maintain a positive attitude.

If you are working a program of recovery, then you know how vital it is to stay positive. Getting down on yourself or harboring negative emotions towards yourself and others will not benefit your recovery.

Naturally, there are several ways that you can bolster your mental health, aside from healthy living. Attending meetings, sharing, and working with a sponsor help to process your emotions productively. Such behaviors will help you manage and cope with stress in nondestructive ways.

There are also activities you can do at home that will aid you in achieving your goal of long-term recovery. Take journaling, for instance, those who journal benefit immensely from the practice.

Keeping a Journal in Recovery

Working a program of recovery teaches you ways of navigating the stressors of everyday life. Stress, as you well know, can derail your recovery if it is not managed in healthy ways. Coping with the obstacles of daily life is not easy for many people in early recovery. As such, men and women in sobriety must adopt practices that can aid in stress management.

You probably go to a meeting or call your sponsor when you are stressed out; bottling up negative emotions is detrimental. However, you may not always be able to catch a meeting or get a hold of a trusted peer. If you have a method for processing what is bothering you when you are alone, then you can keep stress from triggering you and prevent cravings from developing.

Journaling is an effective method of dealing with things that are bothering you. Those who journal are able to gain perspective and insight on how to navigate a challenging situation. What’s more, you do not have to be an excellent writer to benefit from writing, and there isn’t one way of journaling your thoughts.

Addicts and alcoholics in early recovery have many thoughts racing through their heads. They also are still contending with the wreckage of their past, which can lead to negative emotions and stress. Jotting down how you are feeling and the root of it can help you chart a course toward a more positive outlook.

It’s important to distinguish that journaling is not keeping a diary, which is good news for men who may feel like writing about your feelings is not a masculine activity. Many men in recovery journal every day, and it has no impact on masculinity. What’s more, journaling could be boosting their physical fitness.

Journaling Can Boost Your Immune System

F. Diane Barth, a psychotherapist in New York City, wrote a fascinating article on the subject of journaling for NBC Think recently. Barth discusses the myriad of benefits that can come from journaling. Besides boosting your mental health, Barth cites studies that indicate journaling may impact one’s physical health.

Barth, a licensed clinical social worker, points to two different studies that show that journaling is beneficial to the immune system. The belief is that journaling reduces stress, which boosts the immune system, therefore improving your physical health. Diane Barth writes:

The conclusions drawn by both studies were that daily writing about emotionally significant experiences can improve our immune system, probably in a way not totally different from exercise, which is by reducing the chemicals that stress releases in our bodies.

One study, published in JAMA, involved participants who are living with asthma or rheumatoid arthritis. The other study included HIV-infected patients.

As we pointed out above, journaling is helpful for any gender. Barth mentions in her piece that John D. Rockefeller, General George Patton, and Winston Churchill kept journals. It’s fair to say that all three men dealt with enormous amounts of stress at different points in their life.

At PACE, we encourage you to give journal-writing a try when next you feel stressed. If you are already keeping a daily journal, then keep it up as you continue to strengthen your recovery.

California Gender-Specific Mental Health and Addiction Treatment

Are you or a male loved one contending with a mental health disorder, alcohol or substance use disorder, or a co-occurring disorder? If so, please reach out to PACE Recovery Center to learn more about our various evidence-based programs for men. We can help you begin the journey of healing and provide you with the tools to achieve lasting recovery. Please call 800-526-1851 if you have any questions and to discuss treatment options.

Recovery Requires Compassion, Tolerance, and Giving Back

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Tolerance, compassion, and giving back to the recovery community will help you on your path toward progress. At this point in your addiction recovery, you probably know that you cannot make the journey alone; this is especially true if you have completed an addiction treatment program.

If you are attending meetings, then you have seen men and women working together to keep their diseases at bay. You have probably also seen countless acts of compassion like people with more time extending their hand to the newcomer. Making those with short lengths of sobriety feel welcome and safe increases the likelihood that they will stick around.

When you first got to the rooms, you were welcomed with open arms. You saw there was a seat with your name on it and a fellowship that was happy to see you, even though you were a stranger. If you stuck around, got a sponsor, and worked the steps, then you had ample opportunity to develop relationships with your peers. The members of your homegroup are hopefully good friends and acquaintances by now.

Men and women working a program learn the value of compassion and tolerance towards others. They also understand that they must show the same to themselves; people who beat up on themselves for making mistakes or the wreckage of their past have trouble staying the course.

There is a saying in the rooms, look for similarities, not differences between you and your peers. It is exponentially more comfortable to be compassionate and tolerant of others if you adhere to the above principle.

Compassion and Tolerance Allows You to Give Back

Judgment has no place in the rooms of recovery. Each person has their own story, but everyone shares the common goal of lasting progress. When you avoid being judgmental of yourself and others, it is much simpler to maintain a positive attitude. As we say at PACE Recovery Center, a positive attitude changes everything.

If you attend a lot of meetings, then you will come across individuals who are not your cup of tea, and that is alright. You do not have to foster relationships with everyone in the rooms, but you must afford each person compassion and tolerance if you hope to get the same. 12 Steps programs are not religious, but remembering the “Golden Rule” is beneficial. “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”

Remembering the Golden Rule will help you approach each person from a place of kindness and acceptance. It will allow being a pillar of strength with those who have less time than you. Giving back to the community and helping newcomers is why 12 Step recovery has help people stay clean and sober for nearly a century.

Having worked all the Steps and with an established footing in recovery, it’s time to start giving back. You cannot keep what you have if you do not give it away. What does giving back look like? Giving back means sponsoring others, volunteering your time at meetings (i.e., service commitments), and always being there for a fellow member of the community.

Everyone is equal in the rooms of recovery, but the newcomer is of particular importance. Helping them achieve milestones will strengthen your recovery. The 12th Step is not a finish line; it’s the beginning of a new chapter, one that involves paying it forward and carrying the message.

Helping Others in Recovery

Long-term recovery is possible because men and women work together to make personal progress. Protecting your progress will hinge on your willingness to give back and walk others through the steps. Your continued success in the program depends on being a model for all who enter the rooms in the grips of despair.

Walking up to a newcomer and saying hello lets them know that they are not alone, that they’ve come to the right place. Inviting a newcomer to grab a coffee so that you can learn more about them, lets a newcomer know that someone cares. Your compassion could be a catalyst for a newcomer to keep coming back.

Sitting down with someone who has less time than you could lead to sponsorship. If you have worked all the Steps, then you know what to do; you can turn to your sponsor if ever you are unsure about something. So goes the process of recovery; it’s a chain reaction that enables millions of people to achieve long-term recovery.

Southern California Addiction Treatment for Men

At PACE Recovery Center, we specialize in the treatment of men who are struggling with addiction and mental health disorders. Please contact us today to learn more about our evidence-based programs and begin a life-changing journey of recovery. 800-526-1851

Recovery Goal 2020: Being More Positive

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Christmas and Kwanzaa are now behind us, Hanukkah is drawing toward the end, and New Year’s Eve is quickly approaching. At PACE Recovery Center, we hope that everyone in recovery has managed to keep their program secure.

The holiday season is difficult for men and women in sobriety—no matter how much time you have clean and sober. Those who are able to avoid relapse during this emotional time of the year are the individuals who keep a positive attitude and always put their recovery first.

Placing your program before all else means prioritizing meetings and Step work, being of service, and steering clear of risky situations. Men and women in early recovery should stay away from people, places, and things that could trigger a desire to use. The first year is a fragile time, which is why it is vitally critical to stay close to your support network.

With New Year’s Eve on the horizon, we hope that you are making plans for bringing in 2020 safe and sober. Here is Southern California, parties litter the coastline on December 31st; you may find yourself tempted to attend one in your neighborhood. We strongly advise that you make inquiries at your home group about recovery-focused New Year’s Eve gatherings.

People in recovery are not sticks in the mud, and they thoroughly insist on having a good time. What’s more, members of the recovery community understand that one of the best ways to prevent relapse is to stick together. So, after you attend your meetings for the day, get yourself to a place where others in recovery will be celebrating the beginning of 2020.

A More Positive Year in Recovery

At PACE Recovery Center, we remind our clients that a positive attitude changes everything. While we understand that early recovery is daunting, one must do all they can to put their best foot forward.

It’s not always easy to maintain a sunny disposition when you have to face troubling aspects of your past. However, it’s possible to clear your mind of negative thoughts and replace them with things that make you happy.

Remember that the past is behind you; there is nothing that can be done to change what has already happened. If you spend too much time focusing on the negatives of yesterday, it will hinder your ability to make progress, both inside treatment and out.

With a new year brings the promise of achieving novel goals; one realistic and achievable resolution is being more positive. There is a myriad of methods for realizing the goal of being a more positive person. They include, but are not limited to:

  • Being of service to others.
  • Making daily gratitude lists.
  • Introducing a meditation routine into your days.
  • Getting outdoors as much as possible.
  • Being kind to yourself.

Putting Positivity Into Practice

In recovery, there is no shortage of opportunities for being of service to others. Showing up early and leaving meetings late will give you time to talk to newcomers. Showing care and compassion will make you feel better. Before and after meetings also allows you an opportunity to help set up and break down a meeting. You don’t need to have a service position to be useful to your homegroup.

Gratitude is essential to addiction recovery; being grateful for the helpful things and people in your life is invaluable. In 2020, make lists of what is right in your life as often as possible. It helps to see on paper all the people who support you on the path to recovery. When you remind yourself that you are not alone, it enables you to maintain a more positive disposition each day.

Meditation is a proven method of leading a more positive life. There are many resources online to help guide you in this area. Those who meditate feel more grounded throughout their day and are better able to shut out negative thoughts.

Being mindful for just a few minutes a day teaches us that everything changes, making it easier to have hope in dark moments,” explains Jo Eckler, PsyD. “This will also help strengthen your practice of observing—but not always giving into—the negative thoughts your brain likes to conjure.”

Spending more time outside, even for just short intervals, is exceptionally beneficial. Nature has a way of giving us perspective on things that are bothering us. If you are feeling stressed, then pause and walk outside; it will likely make you feel better.

No matter what is happening in your life, be kind to yourself. We all make mistakes but beating yourself up with negative self-talk will not help. Work the problem!

Recovery 2020

We invite adult men to contact PACE Recovery Center if you have an alcohol or substance use disorder. Our dedicated team of behavioral and mental health professionals can also assist men who have a co-occurring mental illness. At PACE, we offer programs for individuals who are not struggling with drugs and alcohol but are plagued by mental health disorders, such as depression.

Please reach out to us today to learn more about our services. We can help you bring in the New Year with healing and recovery and get on the path toward a more positive life.

Recovery Repetitions and Helpful Mantras

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Addiction recovery, among many other things, is about repetition. Long-term sobriety depends on a person’s ability to adopt a new mode of living. Discarding old behaviors and negative mindsets while creating different traditions that don’t involve the use of alcohol or drugs is critical.

Following and sticking to a healthy path takes an enormous effort in early recovery. Keeping temptations and cravings at bay is just one of several obstacles the newly sober face. At times, it can seem like there’s something around every corner lying in wait to derail one’s progress. Which is why developing structured patterns of living that mitigate the risk of making wrong turns is invaluable.

When people finally accept that they have a disease that needs tending each day, they do whatever it takes to nurture their recovery. The first year is about following a blueprint for success that was drafted by countless men and women. The hard mistakes made by generations before gave us a formula for making continued progress. Those who trust the process and stick to the program find no ceiling to what’s achievable.

Over time, one’s new approach won’t seem novel at all. Adhering to and prioritizing the needs of one’s program becomes natural. Men and women will no longer wonder if they will make a meeting or call their sponsor each day. Reaching out a hand to the newcomer will be second nature and being of service wherever and whenever becomes standard operating procedure.

Promoting a Positive Mindset in Recovery

Again, the road to long-term recovery is repetitious. Engaging in the same or similar daily activities, so they become a reflex is vital, but arriving at that point isn’t without difficulty.

At times, calling one’s sponsor will seem like a quotidian struggle. In the first year of recovery, it is common to get burnt out from attending meetings, day in and day out. Sharing in meetings will feel like an impossible task some days. Hearing other people share, ever listening for the similarities and not the differences, can be exhausting.

While it’s not unhealthy to feel frustrated with the program’s redundancies, rebelling against such feelings is paramount. Frustration will foment spiritual unrest and negative thoughts if left unchecked. Interestingly, one of the most repetitive aspects of the program is also a tool for combating annoyance. For example, recovery sayings, maxims, and mantras, such as Keep It Simple, Stupid (KISS).

In meetings of the 12 Step variety like Alcoholics Anonymous, acronyms and repeated quotations abound. Some can be found in the Big Book or other 12 Step-related texts, while others arose organically in the group and were then passed along from one member to the next. Have an attitude of gratitude, turn I wish into I will, and progress, not perfection are prime examples.

The newly sober will hear the above sayings innumerable times just in the first year alone, borderline ad nauseum. Platitudes and maxims might seem annoying at first, but when repeated to one’s self in times of difficulty, they can pull a person out of a funk.

Utilizing the Mantras of Recovery

If you become disinterested in being of service, even though you know it’s beneficial, then try focusing on being more self-aware. Combat your disquiet with subtle reminders like:

  • The healthy person finds happiness in helping others.
  • Humility is not thinking less of yourself, but thinking of yourself less.
  • If you want what you’ve never had, you must do what you’ve never done.

You have probably heard the above lines before and have incorporated at least one into your quiver of recovery sayings. If not, write them down and memorize them; they are helpful to have in your back pocket when feeling unmotivated.

Perhaps you have found yourself bothered by another member of the group and no longer wish to see him or her? While you do not have to like or relate to everyone, your distaste for someone hurts you the most.

Address the problem by talking to your sponsor, rather than deciding to no longer attend a meeting; they may be a member of your homegroup, after all. Discussions will lead you to discover the problem’s root; in these scenarios, people usually find that the issue is internal, not external. Your sponsor may drop another helpful saying on you, albeit with a touch of levity perhaps. He or she may say, “If you like everyone in AA, you’re not going to enough meetings!”

Bothers with the program are typically menial. However, not facing perturbations can disrupt progress. If you put minuscule problems before your sobriety, it will not last. People who no longer put their recovery first are bound to slip, which brings us to our last helpful acronym. SLIP: Sobriety Losing Its Priority!

Gender-Specific Addiction Treatment

At PACE (Positive Attitudes Change Everything) Recovery Center, we equip adult men with the tools to adhere to a program of recovery. Our safe and supportive environment is the ideal setting to restructure and gear your life toward achieving long-term sobriety. Please contact us today to learn more about our gender-specific addiction treatment center.

Recovery: The Benefits of a Positive Attitude

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Alter your thinking, and you change your life. A positive attitude changes everything and working a program of recovery changes the way you see the world. Recovery is an evolution of the mind that allows men and women to achieve their goals and see their dreams come true.

When men and women begin working programs of recovery, they are starting a life-long process. Many things will change along the way, especially the way one thinks about their relationship to the world. Abstaining from drugs and alcohol is a radical change, and so is adopting a mindset geared toward being of service to others and yourself.

In early recovery, most people are somewhat run-down—exhausted from years of substance use and overall dysfunction. It’s not always easy to put a smile on and maintain a sunny disposition. Working a program isn’t easy at first; it’s often a time of significant discomfort. Most individuals are bogged down by painful memories. As the fog clears, one cannot help but recognize the damage caused by their addiction. There is usually no shortage of regret and shame in early sobriety.

While it’s only natural to be bothered by one’s past actions and behaviors, it’s essential not to use them as excuses for relapse. Each person in recovery has things they wish they could take back or change about their story, but it’s paramount to move past such thoughts. When the time is right, each member of the recovery community will have an opportunity to make amends.

In the meantime, it’s best to continue doing things that are conducive to healing, like finding good in each person and each experience. Today, focusing on the present is what matters most, which means taking time each day to maintain a healthy outlook. Positivity is crucial to long-term progress.

Finding the Good in Early Recovery

The mind of someone in the first year of recovery isn’t the safest place. Addiction is always attempting to regain control. It’s beneficial to stay as busy as possible in the first months and years. The more time you spend trying to make progress, the less time you will spend dwelling on the past.

Changing your outlook on life hinges on doing many things each day to protect and strengthen one’s program. Negative thoughts will not overtake those who establish a routine and stick to it. Attending meetings every day provides you with ample opportunities to practice being of service to your peers. Recovery is a collective effort; just as you need the support of others, they require your help too.

Moreover, it feels good to do kind acts for other people. Even the simplest acts of kindness, such as offering a newcomer a ride home, makes you feel better. When you feel good, you are less likely to want to escape reality. Maintaining a positive attitude is made more accessible by tiny selfless acts of service. The smallest of actions can have a tremendous impact.

If you are in recovery, then it means you are willing to do whatever it takes to heal. This process is aided by trying to find the good or silver lining in each experience. If you fixate on what isn’t going your way, then you are likely to miss something salient. In recovery, you learn that not every day is going to be a walk in the park. When times are challenging, it helps to remind yourself of what is right in your life.

Staying positive takes practice, but once you get the hang of it, it becomes second nature. Whenever you are feeling sorry for yourself, be reminded by your progress and the people who’ve helped along the way. Draw strength from the Fellowship, let the energy of the group revitalize you in times of darkness.

In time, you will see the good around you and be less bothered by things you can’t control. Find in recovery some higher purpose, and there will be no limit to what you can achieve.

Southern California Addiction Rehab for Men

At PACE Recovery Center, we specialize in the treatment of adult males with addiction, co-occurring mental illness, and mental health disorders. Please contact us today to learn more about our programs. Our team of highly trained addiction and mental health professionals can help you break the disease cycle and learn how to lead a positive life in recovery.

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