Tag Archives: prescription drugs

Marijuana and Alcohol Vending Machines?

marijuana

Young adults love their technology. If something can be done one way, it most certainly can be done in an easier, more efficient way. You can now walk into store and buy things just by tapping your smartphone. All our information can be stored into these little devices with biometric safeguards to prevent fraud and such. This is a young person's world and they do not want the hassle of what they perceive to be unnecessary steps, like signatures and paper money. But as we trudge headlong into the future, there should be some oversight regarding what it is that can be purchased with little thought and relative ease. Things like prescription drugs, marijuana and alcohol. Right?

If you have been to an airport in the last several years, there is a good chance that you strolled past automated kiosks on your way to the gate that sell anything from lotion to iPods. While the prices are usually outrageous, some will pay to get their hands on something they left at home. The vending machines are novel devices that are essentially a one stop shop for just about any gadget or toiletry you can think of, and maybe pretty soon things that you would have never imagined finding in a vending machine. They don’t just exist in airports you can find them in malls and even casinos.

There are some young men and women today who began smoking at a young age. There is a good chance, depending on which state you grew up in, that you remember cigarette machines that were ideal for acquiring tobacco without an ID. If you knew where one was, then you may have looked at it as a godsend. If you are still smoking today, however, you might have a different view. Which is why we thought it valuable to discuss a world where you could buy marijuana, alcohol and prescription drugs via automated kiosks.

Marijuana Green Machine

In most of the United States people have access to medical marijuana. A number of states have also legalized recreational use for adults. There are scores of dispensaries around the country where you can acquire the drug. However, there is a chance that some states will loosen the restrictions on acceptable places to acquire marijuana, and not just marijuana, but alcohol and pharmaceuticals as well.

An Arizona medical-cannabis technology company created a prototype vending machine that may be selling age-restricted items around the country in the future, USA Today reports. The devices would use biometric verification technology to determine that purchasers are of age or have prescriptions for certain drugs. At American Green, Chief Operating Officer Stephen Shearin believes that the machines would be ideal for both casinos and drug stores.

However, it is hard to imagine any scenario when placing marijuana, prescription drugs and alcohol in one place is a good idea. It is worth noting that alcohol, marijuana and pharmaceuticals can be dangerous on their own. Giving people the ability to acquire them all with only digital safeguards seems quite risky.

Cross-Drug Use

On top of the fact that drugs and alcohol are addictive, mixing them can have serious repercussions, if done on a regular basis. The human body, and the organs responsible for filtering and metabolizing the substances, can only do some much. When the organs are overloaded, damage usually occurs that can affect people for the rest of their lives.

Young men and women already are apt to make reckless decisions, it would seem that adult vice vending machines are a recipe for disaster, disguised as a convenient one stop shop. Drugs and alcohol are not safe, mixing them together can be pave the way to addiction, mixing too much of one or the other can result in premature death.

It is also worth noting that many young adults get on the pernicious road towards addiction by way of alcohol and marijuana. Do we really need vending machines to help them along such a precarious path?

Going forward…

At PACE Recovery Center, we specialize in the treatment of young adults (18-30). This age group greatly benefits from evidence based treatment tailored to their unique needs. We have a multi-pronged approach to our men's addiction treatment program and philosophy because we understand that our clients are complex beings and they make complex choices. We invite your inquiries, should you feel you or your young adult son is in need of treatment.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs

prescription drugsThe overprescribing of opioid painkillers in the United States has created an epidemic that many fear will be extremely difficult, if not impossible, to reverse. At the end of the day, all that we as nation can hope for is mitigating the rampant opioid abuse and overdose rates, a class of drugs both illegal and legal that are responsible for over 70 deaths every day. While it has become more difficult to acquire large quantities of such drugs, sometimes from multiple doctors, prescription opioids are still doled out at alarming rates. Efforts to combat the epidemic with effective measures have led to the U. S. House of Representative adopting the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) last Friday. Yesterday, July 13, 2016, the U.S. Senate voted 90 to 2 to approve the bill; a move which, if all goes well, will hopefully bring about much needed resources for tackling the multifaceted opioid crisis in America. The legislation covers a number of different areas, including:
    • Expanding access to addiction treatment services.
    • Strengthening prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs).
    • Increasing the availability of the opioid overdose reversal drug naloxone.
    • Enlarging the number of prescription drugs safe disposal sites.

Opioids In The Wrong Hands

Historically, when people were written a prescription for particular drugs, the medications were taken until no longer needed. For instance, if you sustained an injury and a doctor prescribed an opioid, then the pills would be taken until the pain dissipated. More often than not, there would be leftover tablets that would reside in one’s medicine chest collecting dust. Such medications were not given another thought and people would continue living their lives. But those were in the times before the epidemic we face today. Today, leftover prescription opioids pose a serious risk to society, as they often end up in the hands of others—sometimes for an injury—sometimes to be abused. Unwanted or unused pain medication can be found in great numbers in medicine cabinets across the country, which some believe to be the result of doctors writing prescriptions for too much of an opioid painkiller. Please keep in mind that the population of the United States is only 5 percent of the world’s population, yet we are prescribed and use the vast majority of the planet’s opioid medication supply. Leftover medication is inevitable. With over 2 million Americans abusing prescription opioids, there is a desperate need to make sure that unwanted medication is disposed of safely—lest the drugs end up in the hands of children or are abused, potentially resulting in an overdose. New research suggest that more than 50 percent of patients’ prescribed opioids have unused medication, according to research published in JAMA Internal Medicine. Despite the fact that most adults are privy to the knowledge that prescription opioids are both addictive and deadly, 20 percent of the research survey participants reported sharing their medication with either friends or family. Perhaps the most troubling finding of the survey was that 50 percent of patients failed to receive information on safe storage or proper disposal of unused/unwanted medication.

Opioid Take-Back Efforts

Federal, state and local governments have made an effort to offer patients with leftover medication access to safe disposal sites for a number of years now. National Prescription Drug Take-back Days result in the collection of millions and millions of pill tablets that would have otherwise sat in medicine cabinets, been flushed down the toilet and/or diverted. Additionally, many pharmacies will take-back your unwanted prescription drugs year round. Nevertheless, whether out of laziness or failing to grasp the severity of the crisis, a significant number of prescription narcotics never make it to safe disposal sites. Simply flushing your pills down the toilet is not a safe form of disposal, evident by the fact that many municipal drinking water supplies contain remnants of prescription drugs. There is now a way to safely dispose of unwanted medication at home. A safe and environmentally responsible method of disposing of prescription meds may be made available to patients across the country in the near future. The Deterra Drug Deactivation System, or Deterra System, is “a simple 3-step process, a user can deactivate drugs, thereby preventing drug misuse and protecting the environment,” according to the product manufacturers website. The system is currently being utilized by:
        • Pharmacies
        • Law Enforcement
        • Healthcare Providers
        • State Agencies
        • Non-Profits
Remember, if you or a loved one are seeking an opiate or heroin rehab and addiction help, please reach out to us today.

House Unanimously Passed Bills Aimed at Opioid Abuse

opioidsLawmakers in Massachusetts continue to spearhead an operation against the opioid epidemic devastating major cities and small towns across the nation. Massachusetts is a state that has felt the overwhelming effects of this crisis, a scourge unprecedented in our times. Lead by U.S. Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy III and U.S. Rep. Katherine Clark, the U.S. House of Representatives unanimously passed two bills devised to combat the insidious effects of opioid abuse, the Boston Herald reports. Kennedy said the unanimous support “speaks to the breadth and depth of the opiate abuse epidemic.” The bill that Kennedy co-sponsored reinstates federal funding to states prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs). Monitoring programs deter “doctor shoppers,” people who go to multiple doctors every month for the same types of prescriptions. While PDMPs exist in 49 states, the need for a nationwide system is necessary. The funding will also be used for drug screening and substance use disorder treatment, according to the article.
There are few people in this country who have been spared the heartbreak of watching a loved one, neighbor or friend fall victim to opiate addiction,” said Kennedy. “It’s an epidemic striking red states and blue states, small towns and big cities, neighborhoods rich and poor.”
Clark’s bill, if passed by the Senate, creates uniform standards for diagnosing and treating neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). The syndrome occurs when fetuses are exposed to opioids, after birth they experience withdrawal symptoms which require extra medical care. The bill would become the first law to address newborns exposed to opioid use, the article reports.
Right now there is no standard for treatment with NAS,” Clark told the Herald. “This problem leads to long stays in the NICU and hundreds of millions in Medicaid dollars.”
___________________________________________________________________________ If you or a loved one suffers from opioid addiction, please contact Pace Recovery Center.

Physicians Have Misconceptions About Opioids

doctorPhysicians who understand the nature of addiction are crucial in the fight against prescription opioid abuse. Unfortunately, a new survey indicates that many doctors have misconceptions about current opioids on the market and lack an understanding of opioid abuse, PsychCentral reports. The findings come from a nationally representative sample of 1,000 primary care physicians. The new survey, conducted by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, showed that almost half of internists, family physicians and general practitioners believe that abuse-deterrent pills are less addictive than traditional opioid medications. The researchers contend that this error in reasoning may be contributing to the prescription opioid epidemic plaguing the country. While abuse-deterrent formulations may make it more difficult for addicts to tamper with pills to be used in unintended ways, such drugs are in no way less addictive than their forerunners.
“Physicians and patients may mistakenly view these medicines as safe in one form and dangerous in another, but these products are addictive no matter how you take them,” study leader G. Caleb Alexander, MD, said in a news release. “If doctors and patients fail to understand this, they may believe opioids are safer than is actually the case and prescribe them more readily than they should.”
The research showed that one-third of the physicians thought that the majority of prescription drug abuse occurs by means of injecting or snorting the medications, rather than orally, according to the article. However, a number of studies show that most prescription drug abuse occurs via oral use.
“Doctors continue to overestimate the effectiveness of prescription pain medications and underestimate their risks, and that’s why we are facing such a public health crisis,” Alexander said.
The findings were published in the Clinical Journal of Pain.

The Cost of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS)

opioidsThe prescription opioid crisis in America has led to a number of babies being born with what's known as Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). Expectant mothers who expose their fetus to opioids of any kind face the risk of giving birth to a child with NAS. The syndrome is the result of withdrawal from the opioid pain medication. Treating infants with NAS is complicated and requires trained medical personnel which can be costly. A new report has found that the costs of NAS treatment for babies have increased dramatically, Science Daily Reports. "At our institution, costs associated with treating infants with NAS are exponentially higher than the costs associated with infants not affected," write Dr. Kay Roussos-Ross, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and colleagues of University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville. The researchers analyzed cost trends for infants with NAS at one university-affiliated hospital between 2008 and 2011. Over the course of the three year study, Dr. Roussos-Ross and coauthors found 160 opioid-exposed newborns:
  • 40 in the first year.
  • 57 in the second year.
  • 63 in the third year.
About 50 to 60 percent of opioid-exposed infants developed symptoms of NAS each year of the study, according to the article. Most of the babies (95) were exposed to "opioid agonist" medications, drugs like methadone and buprenorphine, which are given to pregnant women who have an opioid use disorder. The other 65 babies were exposed to prescription opioids used illicitly by their mothers during the pregnancy. When compared to healthy infants, the researchers found that the cost of treating babies born with NAS is 15 to 16 times higher. Each year, the total costs for treating NAS increased dramatically, the article reports.
  • About $1.1 million in the first year.
  • $1.5 million in the second year.
  • $1.8 million in the third year.
Healthy babies typically spend one or two days in the hospital post-birth. Whereas, babies born with NAS are kept in the hospital for an average of 23 days. Babies that are exposed to opioids in utero that did not develop NAS stay in the hospital for about five days. The findings were published in the Journal of Addiction Medicine.

Higher Dose Narcotics Increase Depression Risks

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe use of any kind of mind altering substance can have an effect on a person’s mental health, in turn causing a number of complications. One of the more common side effects of drug use is depression. Over the last decade, the United States has seen a dramatic rise in prescription opioid use, which has led to an epidemic. New research suggests that individuals who use higher doses of narcotic painkillers are at increased risk of depression, HealthDay reports. The study followed 355 patients in Texas, who reported low back pain at an initial doctor’s visit, and at one-year and two-year follow-up visits. Researchers initially concluded that those who used higher doses of opioids to manage their pain were more likely to experience depression, according to the article. However continued research indicated that most of the risk of depression is due to the duration of narcotic painkiller use, not the dose - but, higher doses usually were accompanied by longer durations of use. “A strong potential explanation of our finding that increasing opioid dose increases risk of depression could be that the patients who increase dose were the longer-using patients,” said lead researcher Jeffrey Scherrer, an associate professor for family and community medicine at Saint Louis University. “This is logical as longer use is associated with tolerance and a need to increase opioids to achieve pain relief.” Establishing a link between painkillers and depression, as well as what dosage might put patients at higher risk, “may inform prescribing and pain management” by doctors, the article reports. “We hope to find risk factors such as opioid misuse that could be in the pathway from chronic opioid use to new onset depression,” Scherrer said in a news release. “This would expand the targets for intervention to limit the risk of depression in patients who need long-term opioid therapy.” The study’s findings were published in the journal Pain.