Tag Archives: sobriety

Addiction Treatment: Asking for Help

addiction

When someone is battling active addiction, long-term recovery can seem like an impossible task. Many people living with alcohol and substance use disorders resign themselves to the belief that there is no hope. It's easy to come to that determination, especially if one is in a state of despair.

A person's belief that all hope may be lost is reaffirmed by each successive, unsuccessful attempt at getting clean and sober. Addicts and alcoholics are predisposed to self-defeating mindsets, so it is easy to see why some might think they are destined to succumb to their disorder. A relapse in early recovery is the fuel on the fire of doubt. At a certain point, one starts to wonder, 'why even bother trying to heal?'

Negativity also is pervasive among individuals who struggle with alcohol and substance use disorders. This is especially true when a person is contending with a co-occurring mental illness like depression; more than half of people living with addiction meets the criteria for a dual diagnosis.

More often than not, addicts and alcoholics first attempt to get clean and sober on their own. It is natural to think that such problems can be managed without assistance. Some will try to moderate or taper off consumption, while others will decide to go for recovery cold turkey. Neither scenarios result in successful outcomes, typically.

Even when outside assistance is within reach, many will opt to avoid seeking help. The desire to make a stab at recovery alone partly stems from the stigma of addiction and the accompanying shame that is its byproduct. Nobody wants to concede to others that they have a problem.

The Inspiration to Seek Help for Addiction and Recover

Asking for help is the most effective approach to addressing addiction and co-occurring mental health disorders. When a person concedes that they have an illness that requires seeking professional assistance to heal from, then they are ready to surrender. Some will make this decision in their early twenties, whereas others will hold out longer and choose to get help after several decades of active use.

In every individual case, there is an impetus that leads a person to ask for help. Sometimes it's an intervention; friends and family often come together to encourage their loved one to seek support. Many people find their way into treatment through the criminal justice system, which is another form of intervention. Sir Elton John found the courage to seek treatment in the wake of Ryan White’s funeral (a hemophiliac who contracted HIV from a blood transfusion).

In 2008, Elton told Larry King that his life was spiraling out of control around that time, the result of 16 years of addiction. At the apex of his unhappiness and poor health, he finally decided to go to rehab. In 1990, he checked into a hospital in Chicago, which, at the time, was one of the only places in North America that would accept patients with drug, alcohol, and food addiction.

"And as soon as I got my courage to say I need help, I went to a facility in Chicago, which was excellent – it was a hospital," said John. He added that it, "was the best thing I ever did…"

Elton John continues to work a program of recovery. He also helps other men take steps toward living a clean and sober life. This week, Sir Elton John celebrated 29 years of addiction recovery, he posted about it on social media:

29 years ago today, I was a broken man. I finally summoned up the courage to say 3 words that would change my life: "I need help." Thank you to all the selfless people who have helped me on my journey through sobriety. I am eternally grateful. — Elton xo

California Addiction Treatment for Men

If you have followed the news of the pop icon's sobriety over the years, then you know that he pays his recovery forward. He has worked with other celebrities who had a hard time with drugs and alcohol, such as Eminem. His willingness to share with the world about his addiction and long-term recovery is a tremendous source of inspiration for those who think that sobriety isn't possible.

Please contact PACE Recovery Center if you need help with and alcohol or substance use disorder. Our evidence-based rehab center for men also specializes in mental health treatment as well. Feel free to reach out to our team at any time of the day to discuss your options and begin the life-changing journey of recovery.

Recovery During Independence Day: Having a Plan

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The Fourth of July is less than 24 hours away, which means that people in addiction recovery are making plans. It’s vital to have a schedule during major holidays, especially the ones synonymous with heavy alcohol consumption. Leaving things up to chance is never a sound practice in sobriety.

Like any holiday, it’s imperative to fill up the day with recovery-centered activities. The goal is to prevent finding oneself in any situation that could compromise progress. Accruing any length of clean and sober time is an enormous undertaking that requires steadfast dedication and vigilance. Nobody wants to jeopardize their hard work, which is why showing deference to the dangers of holidays is paramount.

Men and women who are in the first year of sobriety are often tempted to test the strength of their program. Some are convinced that they can attend holiday functions, barbeques, and parties just like everyone else. While it is possible to go to an Independence Day party without picking up a drink, in most early recovery cases, it’s not worth the risk.

The Fourth is not Christmas; there aren’t the same familial expectations to attend functions. With that in mind, people in recovery are free to forge a safe path from one side of the holiday to the other. Structuring one’s day similar to any other day is beneficial: prayer or meditation, attending home groups, being of service and engaging with one’s peers. Those who put their program first make it last!

Occupying Your Time on the Fourth

Since most businesses are closed on the Fourth of July, many people don’t have to work. It is not uncommon to attend several recovery meetings during holidays, it’s even advised in fact. Meetings are held around the clock to ensure everyone in sobriety has a safe harbor to wait out the turbulent seas that holidays bring. Moreover, recovery communities organize Independence Day events that are a fun time.

When given the option to attend an event that involves alcohol use or one whose guests are in recovery, deciding which is healthier is not challenging. People in early recovery might think that it’s boring to attend a program-related holiday gathering, but please do not knock it until you try it.

Those committed to abstaining from drugs and alcohol are not sticks in the mud, and they know how to have a good time. Another benefit of attending an event hosted by people in the program is that one has the opportunity to bond with their peers outside the rooms. Meeting new men and women out in the world could lead to lasting friendships.

If you haven’t taken the opportunity to make a plan for the holiday, please take action. Another holiday pitfall is isolation; spending too much time alone can be detrimental. Reach out to some of your peers today to find out what they are planning for tomorrow. They may know of something exciting happening that you will want to attend.

Independence from Addiction, Finding Recovery

Tomorrow, we acknowledge our nation’s rich history. On July 4, 1776, the Continental Congress declared independence. The Gentlemen of PACE Recovery Center hope that everyone working a program has a safe and sober Independence Day.

We also understand that millions of American men are in the grips of the disease of addiction and would like to find freedom. We can help adult males break the cycle and transform their lives through working a program of recovery. Please contact us today to take the first steps toward living independently from drugs and alcohol.

Young men who are struggling with non-substance-related mental illness, such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder, are encouraged to reach out to us as well.

The PACE Mental Health Program can treat and help you navigate mood disorders and life obstacles arising during college and young adulthood. Click the link to learn more about our Huntington Beach Mental Health Program.

Recovery Sayings Motivate and Inspire

recovery sayings

Men and women who are new to recovery discover the value of repetition and routine. Addiction recovery is a 24/7, 365 days per year enterprise in making progress. To that end, it’s helpful for newcomers to follow the prescribed recommendations of those with more time. Individuals who follow patterns and understand the value of a daily commitment position themselves for long-term recovery. Moreover, heeding recovery sayings can help people stay on course in early sobriety.

Sponsors and other members of one’s support group will drive certain points home to people with less time. One method of impressing principles on the newcomer is by repeating statements over and over. Acronyms like HALT and KISS roll off tongues frequently ("Hungry, Angry, Lonely, Tired" and "Keep It Simple Stupid"). They are meant to remind the newcomers of what to do and what to avoid when outside the recovery room safety net.

When hearing 12 Step truisms, many in early recovery think the utterings are cliché. It is true that after more than 80 years of 12 Step recovery, many statements are overused. However, slogans like ‘progress not perfection’ are no less valuable today. People living with addiction are often perfectionists. Recovery teaches that no one is perfect, but you can strive to be the best version of yourself. Making progress is the path to achieving that goal.

Look for the similarities, not the differences will always carry water in treating a disease that tells people they are unique. Individuals may tire of hearing them, but there may come a time when they save one’s life.

12 Step Recovery Sayings Aplenty

People who attend 12 Step meetings to aid in their recovery are no strangers to slogans and sayings. Even those new to working a program are already familiar with a handful of maxims, and for a good reason. Simple statements, like "one day at a time," for instance, are easy to remember and can be especially helpful at any stage in the recovery process.

At Alcoholics Anonymous meetings et al. across the country and abroad, the meeting houses’ walls are plastered with useful sayings. While generally short and concise, and considered easy to understand, 12 Step slogans are nuanced. There is a lot more than meets the eye to most recovery sayings; and, they are subject to various interpretations.

People in recovery repeat slogans day-in-and-day-out in an almost automatic manner. However, few people take the time to explore their meaning or offer a further explanation to those who are newer. It is not uncommon for newcomers to misunderstand what is at the heart of expressions like keep it simple. As such, some people are at risk of discounting the value of recovery expressions, chalking them up to being annoying platitudes.

It is essential to keep in mind that 12 Step recovery is a simple program for complicated people. Generally speaking: things are what they seem. Those who try to dissect this decades-old formula for healing can jeopardize their recovery. Breaking down every aspect of the program can muddy the water and make it difficult to find clarity. This wheel does not require reinvention. Poking holes in the Program for the sake of poking holes isn't beneficial. There is however nothing wrong with asking questions to glean a better understanding.

Below, we will discuss some of the more common 12 Step slogans. Being equipped with a better understanding of recovery sayings can be of significant benefit to newcomers.

Slogans for Long-term Recovery

There is no shortage of catchy recovery sayings, and each one of them speaks to people differently. Men and women who are unsure about what something means should never hesitate to ask for clarity. Those with more recovery time are always happy to provide insight. The success of the oldtimer depends on their willingness to help the newcomer.

Let’s take a moment to discuss some of the more common watchwords and slogans. HALT is fairly straightforward. Avoid hunger, anger, loneliness, and tiredness; such states of being are a cause of stress. Of course, mental pressure is often a factor in causing self-defeating and self-destructive behaviors.

If it is not broken, don’t try to offer a fix! The 12 Step method works, for anyone willing to work it. Paradox and inconsistencies are out there if someone is looking. However, that doesn’t mean it’s a person’s job to amend the program. It’s alright to notice contradictory things, but it is paramount to avoid letting observations color your view of the program.

Intellect is not a bad thing, yet it can cause complications. Addiction is a mental illness and a spiritual sickness. Treatment addresses the medical side of the problem; Twelve Step recovery tends to the spiritual facet of the condition.

Keep It Simple Stupid reminds us that our best thinking can exacerbate our problems. Intelligence is going to offset a spiritual deficit. The goal is not to let one’s powers of deduction block them from receiving the gifts of recovery. Simplicity is a good thing!

12 Step recovery calls for abstinence and much more; long-term progress demands significant lifestyle alterations. It also calls for looking at life and the people in it differently.

Nothing Changes if Nothing Changes

In early recovery, there is much a person can find to be unhappy about. The gifts of healing do not come instantly. Embracing a positive attitude, as often as possible, is necessary to realize progress and one’s dreams. The saying nothing changes if nothing changes reminds us that recovery requires more of people than not drinking or drugging. Avoiding old friends and unsafe environments is excellent, but so is changing how we think.

Positive actions and maintaining a positive attitude, changes everything. Negative thinking prevents people from taking positive steps each day. Progress depends on positivity as much as it depends on making lifestyle changes.

At PACE Recovery Center, we place much stock in the power of positive thinking. We have seen how significantly a positive attitude changes everything for those new in recovery. Please contact us to learn more about our gender-specific treatment programs for men living with addiction and other forms of mental illness. Our dedicated team of addiction professionals can help you or a loved one learn how to live a positive life in recovery.

Recovery Helps Young Men Achieve Their Goals

recovery

When a young man gives up drugs and alcohol, hopefully for good, there is no limit on what he can achieve. Anyone still in the grips of addiction may find that statement hard to believe. Maybe such readers are asking themselves, "What’s the catch?" There isn’t one! All that recovery asks of people is willingness and honesty. A willingness to be open-minded and honest, even when every cell in the body urges one to do the opposite.

Learning to live life on life’s terms, choosing to no longer be driven by fear, is a recipe for opening doors. The tendency to self-sabotage and adhere to a self-defeating mentality disappears when one surrenders. When a man accepts that he has an incurable affliction and is willing to do whatever it takes to manage his symptoms of mental illness, he discovers a life once thought impossible.

When young men find the courage to reinvent their lives, it is a gift. Moreover, recovery is the ultimate gift that keeps on giving. Working a program grants people the honor of helping others find the strength to make similar changes. There are few feelings as potent as what one experiences when he witnesses recovery transform the life of another. Knowing that your selfless acts of kindness, understanding, and gentle guidance played a critical role in saving a life is remarkable.

People In Recovery Inspire

People who embrace long-term sobriety become inspirations to those who are still "out there" and newcomers alike. Since most in recovery do so with the benefit of anonymity, it can be challenging to find inspiring people outside "the rooms" to look to for motivation. Fortunately, more and more people are turning their back on the societal stigma of addiction. That ever-pressing urge to keep both the addiction and recovery a closely guarded secret loses its appeal with each passing year.

In the twenty-first century, many celebrities and icons are opening up about their struggles and recoveries. Several athletes, musicians, and movie stars are sharing their experiences, strength, and hope with the world. In doing so, members of the general public are finding the will to reach out for assistance and they are healing. While each person in recovery has the right to share their story with whomever they choose – or not – no rule says sobriety shouldn’t be talked about openly.

The 91st Academy Awards have passed, but before they aired, one nominee shared that he owes his life and success to sobriety. Some readers may have had an opportunity to watch A Star Is Born: a film that has been remade three times now. The most recent iteration stars Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga. Cooper directed the film and played the addicted rock star named Jackson Maine. It turns out it was a role Cooper was uniquely equipped for, owing to his history with substance abuse, mental health, and fifteen years of sobriety.

The stories that exist in this story, it comes from a very deep personal place and that's the only way that I know how to communicate with many people," Cooper tells The New York Times.

A Recovery Is Born

In 2012, Mr. Cooper spoke with The Hollywood Reporter (THR) about the roots of his mental health and addiction struggles. His story is likely to resonate with many young men, both in active addiction or recovery.

Bradley started drinking at a young age and began having suicidal ideations at the turn of the century. An injury led him to an opioid use disorder. He acknowledges that his path to addiction was a consequence of deep-seated insecurities: a sentiment familiar to many in recovery.

I was so concerned what you thought of me, how I was coming across, how I would survive the day," he told THR. "I always felt like an outsider. I just lived in my head. I realized I wasn't going to live up to my potential, and that scared the hell out of me. I thought, 'Wow, I'm actually gonna ruin my life; I'm really gonna ruin it.'"

Once Bradley decided to make changes, his life started to improve — as did his mental health. He came to see that he didn’t need drugs and alcohol to cope with his insecurities. In 2015, with eleven years sober, he shared with Barbara Walters that he owes his whole life to sobriety:

"I would never be sitting here with you, no way, no chance [if I hadn't gotten sober,]" he said. "I wouldn't have been able to have access to myself or other people, or even been able to take in other people, if I hadn't changed my life. I never would have been able to have the relationships that I do. I never would have been able to take care of my father the way I did when he was sick. So many things."

PACE Recovery Center Young Adult Rehab

Our clinical team specializes in working with young adult males battling chemical dependency and behavioral health issues. Since more than half of individuals living with addiction also struggle with co-occurring mental illness, it is critical to seek help from a center that can treat the entire patient. PACE Recovery Center provides young men with a structured program: one that teaches clients how to live balanced lives free from drugs and alcohol. We invite you to contact us for yourself or a loved one to discuss treatment options.

“We believe that incorporating sound clinical interventions and a lifestyle that encourages health and wellness, in a shame-free setting that encourages accountability and responsibility, will help foster long term recovery.”

Addiction Recovery Opens Career Doors

addiction recovery

When mind-altering substances are out of a person’s system, and a program of addiction recovery is established, many will ask, “What’s next?” Of course, the answer to that question is purely subjective. What is certain is that whatever people in recovery put their minds to can be accomplished.

Another truism for a good number of people in recovery is that they can’t go back to doing what they did before they broke the cycle of addiction. After undergoing treatment, there are some who find their previous lines of work or study untenable when leading a life in recovery. That’s not to say that there are not sober bartenders, for instance, but it’s not challenging to see why certain types of employment could jeopardize progress.

There are also young men and women in sobriety who have never held down a job. There are others who started college only to have their disease stymie the endeavor. So, with few points to jump off from in life after treatment, it is only natural that young adults will consider working in the field of addiction medicine. Moreover, people in recovery learn early on that to keep what they have they must also give it away—pay it forward. What better way to give back to the addiction recovery community than to help others find serenity, too?

In fact, it is quite common for treatment alums to volunteer their services at the very center that had a hand in saving their lives. Such individuals realize that by staying close to the source of their addiction recovery, they strengthen the foundation of their recovery. Going back home – for many people – is not always the best option following treatment.

Giving Back to The Addiction Recovery Community

Over time, volunteers or just those dedicated to sobriety often decide that the field of addiction medicine is a viable career path. One can be a productive member of society, reciprocate the gift of recovery to other willing people, and safeguard their sobriety in one fell swoop.

As one would expect, working in the substance use disorder workforce will require some education; or, a lot of schooling depending on how far one wants to go. Doctors in recovery, after all, are not unheard of, which is again a testament to the door-opening potential of working a program.

It goes without saying that attending college to become a counselor or a medical doctor will cost a significant amount of money. Except for a small demographic in America, higher education will call for student loans; and, such debts can accumulate quickly. However, we have some excellent news for anyone who is interested in working in the field of addiction recovery and medicine.

The Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Workforce Loan Repayment Program can help addiction treatment clinicians repay up to $75K in student loans, in exchange for a three-year commitment to provide substance use disorder treatment services at National Health Service Corps-approved sites. The Health Resources and Services Administration, an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, writes:

The purpose of the National Health Service Corps (NHSC) Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Workforce Loan Repayment Program (LRP) (hereafter referred to as the NHSC SUD Workforce LRP) is to recruit and retain medical, nursing, and behavioral/mental health clinicians with specific training and credentials to provide evidence-based SUD treatment and counselling [sic] in eligible communities of need designated as Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSAs).

A Career In Addiction Medicine

HSC SUD Workforce LRP participants have a choice between three years of full-time or part-time service. Those eligible will receive funds to repay their outstanding, qualifying, educational loans. One caveat is that those serving in a private facility are not eligible to practice half-time.

Dr. Gabriel Wishik, who works for Boston Health Care for the Homeless, took part in a loan repayment program from the same federal agency, according to MassLive. He points out that such programs do two things: help lure qualified candidates and increase the number of clinicians in a field that struggles to fill positions in many areas. He said, “there is a shortage at every single level in the treatment continuum.”

There are lots of competing career paths. It’s one way to get people into this career,” he said.

People in their first years of addiction recovery who have an interest in working in the field can benefit from looking to the HSC SUD Workforce LRP. At PACE Recovery Center, we encourage our clients to pursue higher education and know that men in their first years of recovery can make excellent substance use disorder technicians and clinicians. In fact, we have current team members who were once PACE Recovery Center clients.

PACE Academy

We understand that that pursuing higher education in recovery can be complicated; university culture, for instance, can put a person’s sobriety at risk. With that in mind, our PACE Academy program helps young men in early sobriety pursue their dreams and protect their sobriety. PACE Academy also provides Certified Alcohol Drug & Alcohol Associate credentialing for those interested in working in the field of addiction medicine.

Please contact us today to learn more about how you can reach your recovery and academic goals at Pace Academy.

Addiction Recovery Comes First On Holidays

addiction recovery

Last week, we wrote at length about people in addiction recovery making flexible and adjustable resolutions. We also included a brief section about observing major holidays as one might any other day of the year. It is critical to avoid giving specific days of the year more power than they deserve. Stress and emotional turmoil can accompany holidays, but such feelings should not be an excuse to use drugs and alcohol.

Christmas is drawing near, and New Year's Eve is close behind. It is vital to go over some techniques for keeping your recovery intact into 2019. Each person working a program of recovery has tools at their disposal for coping with trying situations. For many people, being around family can precipitate mental strain. Fortunately, individuals who practice the principles of recovery can make it through any holiday.

Conversely, some individuals whose families are not currently a part of their lives are prone to melancholy. Active addiction steals much from a person. The choices one makes in service to their disease can result in familial estrangement. Having the knowledge that you are not welcome at a holiday gathering can lead to mental fatigue. Such people are more apt to start feeling sorry for themselves and are at a heightened risk of experiencing problems.

Protecting Your Addiction Recovery During The Holidays

Each individual in addiction recovery has different life circumstances, and nothing is set in stone. Recovering addicts' lives change regularly. One must do their best to manage and cope with family-induced stress or loneliness. It's possible to avoid recovery pitfalls during Christmas and New Year's, and your support network can help. Those who stay close to their circle and are honest about their limitations can stay on track. Below you will find some helpful tips for preventing relapse this Christmas and New Year's Eve.

First, develop tactics for attending family gatherings. Also, have a plan for weathering the blues that can come from not being in the company of relatives. A strategy for either for each must include attending meetings of recovery. Groups are held around the clock during every significant holiday. Prioritize catching a meeting both before and after attending family events. Those who are not expected at the Christmas dinner can use the free time to be in the company of recovery peers. People in addiction recovery will often host sober holiday gatherings, too. It is imperative to ask around and find ways to fill your holiday schedule.

Second, the holiday season is notorious for overeating and lounging around the house. Prioritizing self-care is helpful. People in recovery can never lose sight of the importance of maintaining their spiritual and physical exercise routines. Addiction recovery is about balance, and prayer and meditation help keep one's equilibrium. Individuals who exercise daily can benefit from finding time for light exercise on Christmas. Not giving certain days of the year power means sticking to one's normal recovery routine as much as possible.

Positive Attitude Changes Everything

Each person is at a different point in addiction recovery. Meaning, some people may not yet be where they want to be. The gifts of uninterrupted sobriety, after all, come when the time is right—not a moment sooner. In the meantime, it is essential to maintain a positive attitude regardless of having family in your life or not.

Those not yet where they would like to be in life can take comfort in recognizing the progress made thus far. Each day clean and sober is a source of pride. People in their first year of sobriety should be able to easily remember how unfortunate life was just a short time ago. The coming holidays may not look the way one hopes, but it will seem significantly better than what would be without recovery.

Whatever one's schedule looks like on December 25th or 31st, family time or not, everything will be copacetic if you keep doing the next right thing for your addiction recovery throughout the day. Remind yourself of the importance of maintaining an open mind. Be accepting of those around you and minimize expectations. Most importantly, remember that a positive attitude changes everything.

Christmas is a season for kindling the fire for hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.” ―Washington Irving

The Gentlemen of PACE Recovery Center would like to wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. We are hopeful that people in recovery will practice the principles and utilize their toolbox for a safe and sober holiday. Please contact us if you require assistance for alcohol or substance use disorder.

Recovery: Attitude Changes Everything

recovery

Attitude can make or break a person’s recovery! Those who fixate on the negative aspects of their life – there are often many in early recovery – are at a significant disadvantage. Conversely, individuals who do everything in their power to find the positive in every situation find themselves more able to stay on track. As we say here at PACE Recovery Center, Positive Attitude Changes Everything.

It is not uncomplicated to find upsides in one’s life in the beginning; guilt and shame are known to accompany early sobriety. When the thick haze of active addiction first settles the wreckage of the past is usually overwhelming. People begin to see the real impact their mental illness has not just in their life but also the lives of those they love when the dust settles after entering treatment. For most, looking at the big picture of addiction is extremely painful; some may find looking in the mirror too much to handle, at first.

Coming to terms with where your life is when recovery is in its infancy could be compared to an emotional rollercoaster. On the one hand, you have the elation that comes with making the courageous decision to address your disease. On the other, there is the reality that putting down the drugs and alcohol may be the least laborious aspect of one’s recovery; clients quickly learn that they will have to face their feelings and delve into the underlying issues of addiction to achieve their goals.

Treatment and working a daily program of recovery asks much of an individual, but each person can take comfort in knowing that they are not alone. Unlike the experience of active alcohol and substance use, you can take pleasure in knowing that you have support today. Some days will be remarkably difficult and maintaining a positive attitude will make all the difference. When a man sets a course for recovery, he comes to realize that his line of thinking can hinder progress.

Searching for Positivity in Recovery

Once detoxification is complete, the mind is clearer which can reveal some unwelcome aspects about oneself. A person has to contend with the outcome of leading the kind of life they once lived before finding treatment, and face – perhaps for the first time – some of the fallout. Simply put, most find it hard to move the facial muscles into the shape of a smile in early recovery and for understandable reasons. However, it is paramount that such men do not let the upsets of their past prognosticate the future.

Each person in long-term recovery was once a newcomer, and they had to make sense of the same types of realizations that those new to the program are wrestling with presently. The mere fact that they were able to skirt the pitfalls of early sobriety can serve as a source of comfort and hope that how you feel today will pass. If you remind yourself that feelings are not facts and that ‘this too shall pass,’ lasting recovery is possible; but, it is paramount that you surround yourself with positive people. Optimism is a guiding force in recovery and sticking close to the people you meet in the program with good attitudes will help you find the strength to spurn negativity.

Some who work a program swear by the aphorism, “fake it till you make it;” in recovery circles, the statement may be held as a platitude, one that you will hear much over the years. Essentially, the above saying suggests that those who imitate confidence and optimism will one day realize such qualities in himself. Simply put, smiling even when you think there is nothing to smile about can have a beneficial impact on your behaviors. Give it a try; you may be surprised.

Tips for Positive Outlook

A good many people new to the program believe they have deficits that need to be addressed. Some are out of work, while others have lost their license due to a DUI. There are those whose families are no longer conversing with them, and it will take time for their loved ones to notice the changes afoot. Still, others are in debt from years or decades of financial mismanagement; the list can go on and on, but what is missing from one’s life is not the salient matter. What’s essential in the first months of recovery is learning to live life on life’s terms and incorporating the principles of the program into everyday life.

Developing life skills in place of self-defeating behaviors allows people to address all the negative aspects of life leftover from the past when the time is right. Learning what it means to be responsible for your actions and accountable to others is a means of affecting the changes men and women desire.

Take stock of the small milestones each day as you plot a course to your broader goals. Each day that doesn’t involve drugs or alcohol is worth being proud about and may even result in a wave of joy, ride it.

Gratitude is an excellent way to improve your outlook. Be grateful for the things you possess right now, and for some of the things that you lack for they give you something to work towards. Tell those who are helpful to you how thankful you are to have their support. Do something kind, even a minute gesture of kindness, can go along way; when you make another person’s day better, you benefit too. Pay it forward!

No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. – Aesop

Positive Changes

Please contact PACE Recovery Center if drugs and alcohol have made your life unmanageable. Our team can assist you in achieving your goals with the help of evidence-based therapies. We offer a safe, sober and supportive environment for making positive changes in your life. We are available at any time to field any questions you have about our program.

It is our great pleasure to be part of your incredible journey into recovery.

Sobriety: Making Positive Life Changes

sobriety

Aside from being a highly acclaimed novella by Franz Kafka, metamorphosis is also a word that holds particular significance for people transforming their lives via programs of addiction recovery. A definition of the noun states a change of the form or nature of a thing or person into an entirely different one, by natural or supernatural means. If that doesn’t nicely sum up sobriety, and the effect it can have on an individual’s life, then what does?

If you read the novel in school or for leisure, you probably remember that at its heart the story is about a man’s struggle for existence. If you are in recovery, you don’t have to read Kafka’s works to understand how arduous altering a single solitary thing in one’s life can be, let alone changing everything. Recovery demands a paradigm shift in thinking, or to steal a line from an even more relevant book, donning “A New Pair of Glasses.” Committing oneself to a program of long-term sobriety gives people a different perception; when the fog of alcohol and drugs lifts, you see things with clarity. When you work a program, it can completely alter your perspective, attitude, and it allows for continual growth in positive directions. A true metamorphosis, in every sense of the word!

With active drug and alcohol use behind us, we choose engagement over isolation. When Self is no longer harboring illusions of total control, one can develop a relationship with something higher. And, that something – while different for each of us – guides us both inside and out toward making the next right decision. In recovery, people have the tools to face their problems with a positive attitude; rather than recoiling from life’s curveballs, we take action. Positive Attitude Changes Everything!

Starting Over In Recovery

Nobody can deny that changing the people, places, and things in life is a difficult task. Even more challenging, is that individuals in recovery also have to change how they look at just about everything. Gone are the days of feeling sorry for one’s self; it is no longer OK to hold other people responsible for how life is today. Recovery teaches us that we have to take responsibility for our decisions and be accountable for the outcome of our choices. Equally vital, placing emphasis on staying accountable to others.

For many people new to working a program, there comes the realization that they cannot take this journey alone—just one of many critical epiphanies. When the seed of recovery is germinating, individuals have the awareness that the way life was before is no longer tenable. One must be present today, always making an effort to connect with men and women in their support network. Such people have to strive to be of service to others; individual sobriety is not mutually exclusive from collective recovery.

Early on in the quest for sobriety, men and women have to come to terms with the fact that life will never be the same. People who you once considered friends and allies, start looking decidedly less so; if recovery is to grow, pruning some of the underbrush of one’s past is a must. People’s environments need to change too; in recovery, going to a bar to catch up with friends isn’t safe. Engaging in activities that are inextricably connected to past substance use often have to go as well. In some cases, that includes places of employment.

Journey to Sobriety

While we specialize in working with men at PACE Recovery Center, there is much wisdom that we can glean from women taking the journey to sobriety. Author Kristi Coulter made a critical decision recently about the line of work she was in; a choice which many men in recovery can probably relate. Before she earned recognition for writing about her life sober, Coulter held several executive positions with Amazon. Kristi held jobs that many people could only dream of, which is why it may come as a surprise that last February Coulter quit working in the tech sector. Now, she is thoroughly committed to writing about the new quest she is on—sobriety.

Coulter got sober in 2013. Since then she has documented her life on her blog, Off-Dry, Seattle Magazine reports. With five years free from alcohol under her belt, she published a collection of essays titled "Nothing Good Can Come from This" (released August 7). She tells Woolfer in an interview that the book is about “what happens when a high-achieving, deeply unhappy fortysomething woman gives up the ‘one’ thing she really thinks she can’t live without–wine–and has to remake her entire sense of self from the ground up.” She talks about working in the high-stress tech-sector, about how alcohol use and addiction is pervasive in the industry. Like many people new to sobriety, she began penning her thoughts. An essay that she wrote was picked up and led to a book deal. Coulter says she hopes her writing will inspire others to confront their relationship with substances.

I’d love for people to think, ‘What would my life be like after I got rid of the thing that I know I don’t need but [that] I can’t seem to walk away from?’”

Addiction Recovery

At PACE, we take a dynamic approach to our men's addiction and mental health treatment program. We help clients face the underlying issues of their condition(s) and teach men how to discard self-defeating behaviors and adopt attitudes of positivity. Please contact us to learn more about how we can make the dream of recovery your long-term reality.

John Goodman’s Battle With Alcoholism

alcoholism

Before John Goodman was a cultural icon known as Walter, the off-kilter, Jewish convert, Vietnam Vet who ‘doesn’t roll on Shomer Shabbos in “The Big Lebowski,”’ he was best known for his role as Dan Conner in “Roseanne.” Many of our readers may not remember that in the 1990’s, “Roseanne” dominated television ratings thanks to the humorous and touching interplay between Goodman and Roseanne Barr. Those of you who were regular watchers of the show may find it surprising to learn that all was not well on the set of the show during its first nine seasons, owing to John Goodman’s alcoholism.

Those of you familiar with John Goodman's body of work know that he is an immensely capable actor whose roles leave a lasting impression. From Hollywood to Broadway, he is notorious for stealing the scene; a powerhouse actor in Academy award-winning films, such as The Artist (2011) and Argo (2012). His honors for television include both Emmy and Golden Globe Awards.

After 21 years off the air, "Roseanne" returned to television with the original cast. Just to give you an idea of how successful the first show run (1988-1997) was, the current series premiere held the attention of more than 18 million viewers. Naturally, both Roseanne Barr and Goodman are fielding interviews left and right; and some of the questions people are asking Goodman concern his battle with alcoholism.

Addiction Beneath the Surface

In a recent interview with TODAY’s Willie Geist, Goodman discusses what finally occurred for him to seek addiction treatment. The combination of starring in a hit television show and his newfound loss of anonymity, Goodman says he began using alcohol to cope. He says he almost didn't see the series through to its end; he admits that drink on set was a regular occurrence; “My speech would be slurred.”

I got complacent and ungrateful. And after nine years—eight years, I wanted to leave the show,” he said. “I handled it like I did everything else, by sittin' on a bar stool. And that made it worse.

Some ten years ago after going on a severe bender, he found himself with shaking hands in need of help, according to the interview. Goodman called his wife, and from there he went into treatment.

I was shaking, I was still drinking, but I was still shaking," he said, recalling that weekend. "I had the clarity of thought that I needed to be hospitalized.

Please take some time to watch the interview:

If you are having trouble watching, please click here.

Alcoholism Standing in the Way

One takeaway from Goodman’s decade-long sobriety is that life and work are possible without using alcohol as a coping mechanism. He was unable to appreciate life when he was at the top of the world in the 90’s because of his alcoholism; the reboot is an opportunity for him to do things differently, to do things right. It goes to show that when drugs and alcohol are out of the picture, one has the opportunity to be grateful for life and all the many blessings.

If you are a young man caught in the grips of alcoholism, PACE Recovery Center can help you break the cycle of addiction and begin the journey of recovery. Please contact us today to learn more about our program.

Addiction Recovery: A Fellowship of Miracles

addiction recovery

“Don’t leave before the miracle happens.” Those of you new to addiction recovery have undoubtedly heard that before. It’s likely you understand what it means: Don’t give up on working a program of recovery before you get to enjoy the fruits of your labor. Anyone who has been in the program for a time will agree that there are no shortages of miracles in the rooms of recovery. Each person dedicated to sobriety is a miracle; resisting one’s programming takes tremendous commitment and fortitude. While there will always be difficult times (even in abstinence), the worst day in recovery is far better than the best day in active addiction.

mir·a·cle
ˈmirək(ə)l/
noun
A highly improbable or extraordinary event, development, or accomplishment that brings very welcome consequences.

It stands to reason that we will all have a different opinion on what constitutes a miracle. Everyone is going to consider the unexplainable subjectively, and that’s OK. However, it’s nearly impossible to look at someone in recovery objectively without being inspired. Going from the depths of despair to the spiritual light of recovery, two realms diametrically opposed, is almost unbelievable. People who’ve been around a while have seen newcomers, once in a dismal state of being, turn their lives around via the principles of addiction recovery.

If you were to ask the same newcomers how their recovery was made possible, they might struggle to find an answer. Making sense of how recovery works is challenging in a society that turns to medicine and science for solutions. A group of men and women meeting daily to check in with each other, giving feedback and guidance when asked, can seem likely an unlikely method of promoting healing. It works!

You Are the Miracle of Recovery

When bad things are happening in one’s life it’s noticeable right away. When good things are happening, it’s often difficult to recognize. Early in recovery determining how one’s life has improved is challenging, miracles can be both subtle and elusive. Taking stock of one’s progress isn’t easy when you are new to the program but rest assured, if you are staying sober and doing the work a transformation is taking place. If you are willing to do the Work, are open and honest with yourself and others, it’s a miracle in itself.

After an extended period of going to meetings and doing step work with a sponsor you might realize that you are the miracle for which you were waiting patiently. Sure, the program might bring about getting the family back in one’s life, financial security, and anyone of a multitude of gifts; but the fact that you have gone a string of 24-hour periods without a drink is a miracle. It’s a real achievement if you woke up today and asked yourself how you can be of service to your fellows in recovery. Rather than setting a selfish course for your day, you are focused on how you can act selflessly, helping others achieve the common goal of recovery.

One of the most satisfying feats is getting through a day without thinking about using drugs or alcohol. Cravings and fixations wax and wane in recovery, but early on they can be pretty intense. As time passes, you will think about using less and less; instead of looking for an escape from daily life you’ll find a desire to be a part of your existence. Urges to isolate will be replaced by a yen for inclusion in the happenings of other people’s lives.

As Long as It Takes

You can become blind by seeing each day as a similar one. Each day is a different one, each day brings a miracle of its own. It's just a matter of paying attention to this miracle.” — Paul Coelho

Nobody finds recovery by accident. When one’s life is discordant, a need for change is self-evident. Realizing that action is required to bring about such a change doesn’t always come quickly. People can toil in the misery of addiction for unconscionable lengths of time. When the choice is finally made to seek help and efforts are taken to bring it about, individuals experience their first miracle in recovery.

Much is required of any person looking to break the cycle of addiction and transform their life for the better. There will be times when you question why you are going to meetings day-in-and-day-out. You might find yourself doubting the miracles promised by your peers in the program, but for different reasons than you might think.

Perhaps you had the thought that the gifts of recovery would originate externally? If that is the case, you might consider changing your perspective. The real miracles of addiction recovery come from within, connecting with the spiritual realm is the gift, and in recovery, you are the miracle. You can see evidence of that when considering your existence before finding addiction recovery and after. The transformation may not be evident right away, in time all shall reveal itself to you—as long as you are willing to work the program for as long as it takes. Although, if you ask your peers who have been around longer, such realizations will come sooner than you think.

Taking Certain Steps for Addiction Recovery

Do you want something different for your life than living in a cycle of addictive and self-defeating behavior? Addiction recovery is possible, and we at PACE Recovery Center can help you realize the dream of serenity. Armed with tools and skills for keeping addiction at bay, you too can live a life of lasting recovery. Please contact us today to begin the transformative journey of addiction recovery.

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