Tag Archives: relapse

Addiction Recovery: Brotherhood and Fellowship is Beneficial

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One of the benefits of seeking gender-specific addiction treatment is fostering relationships with people of the same sex. Early recovery is a challenging time, and avoiding distractions is paramount. Men who stick close to other men are better able to stay the course of addiction recovery during this period.

At PACE Recovery Center, we firmly believe that men can more easily stay focused without the distraction of the other sex. Gender-specific treatment provides men the opportunity to bond and work closely with relatable people. Our facility gives men the ability to address the factors that contributed to their addiction from the male perspective.

Addiction is a complex disease that affects men and women in different ways. Adult males face unique societal, familial, and environmental pressures, some of which play a role in developing alcohol and substance use disorders.

Being in the company of individuals who have faced similar pressures as you is hugely beneficial. Men understand each other better, and in ways that women cannot, which is why choosing gender-specific treatment is ideal for achieving successful outcomes.

Some of the fellows you go through addiction treatment with will become lifelong brothers in recovery. Brotherhood and fellowship are essential to sustain lasting recovery.

A Recovery Brotherhood

After treatment, you will work closely with other men to achieve common goals. Your sponsor will also be male, which means he can understand what you’re going through when working the steps. What’s more, your deep bench of support will consist primarily of men; these are the people you will turn to when obstacles arise.

While you will inevitably foster platonic relationships with women in the program by attending meetings, building strong bonds with men must come first. If you prioritize establishing a strong sense of community with other men, then you will be better able to always put your recovery first.

Early addiction recovery is a fragile time that requires dedication and focus. Members of the opposite sex can be a significant distraction during your first year. Friendships with women can quickly morph into something more. You may have heard by now that it’s best to steer clear of romantic entanglements during your first year.

You will have a much better understanding of how you perceive and connect with the opposite sex once you have worked all 12 Steps. Many men in early recovery do not know how to be only friends with women. Moreover, female interactions can be triggers for some individuals; romance has been a factor for many a relapse in early recovery. So is rejection!

If you develop feelings for another member of the program and it’s unrequited, it can lead to negative self-talk and a sense of unworthiness. You can avoid such occurrences by sticking close to other men in the program.

As you become more stable in your recovery, you will learn how to have healthy relationships with women. There is no need to rush because there will be plenty of time down the road for romance, provided that recovery comes first always.

Lifelong Friendships with Men in Addiction Recovery

Finding long-term recovery depends upon your ability to work closely with other men. Achieving milestones in the program doesn’t happen without help. If you bond with men in your homegroup – both inside and outside the meeting rooms – they will become your sober friend group.

After working with such people for an extended period, you will feel a connection. There will not be anything that you will not feel comfortable sharing with your brothers in recovery. Your male friends will provide you with valuable feedback and help you stay accountable. They will also let you know if they think you are putting something before your recovery.

Simply put, having friends is essential to sustaining your program, and having friends of the same sex is best in early recovery. If you stay the course and follow directions, you are guaranteed to develop lifelong friendships with men in addiction recovery.

Southern California Gender-Specific Addiction Treatment

While beginning a journey of recovery at a co-ed facility is possible, those hoping to break the cycle of addiction for good often find gender-specific treatment the best starting point. If you are an adult male who is struggling with addiction, co-occurring disorder, or a standalone mental illness, the PACE Recovery is here to help.

Please contact us today to learn more about our evidence-based treatment center and the benefits of gender-specific therapies. We are available to answer your questions or begin the admissions process around the clock, 365 days a year. You can reach out to us today at 800-526-1851 to start the journey of addiction recovery.

Addiction Recovery: Always Make Time for Your Program

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Most people in addiction recovery would agree that the first years are the most challenging. If you are in early recovery, then you have probably dealt with some tricky situations already. Hopefully, you were equipped with tools to cope with whatever obstacles you faced.

Addiction recovery often begins with detox and a residential or an intensive outpatient program. Such settings position the newly sober for success by providing individuals with a stable support network. In treatment, people learn the importance of maintaining a positive attitude and always work to put recovery first.

Many would argue that the real tests of one’s ability to stay clean and sober begin after treatment. When you no longer have the close supervision of guidance counselors and clinicians, it’s up to you to be accountable to your program.

After rehab, the first course of action should always be finding a homegroup and a sponsor. Diving right into steps is essential to achieving the goals you set for yourself while in treatment. Those who put off getting to meetings and establishing a support network after treatment place their progress in jeopardy.

Always Make Time for Your Addiction Recovery

Completing an addiction treatment program is a significant accomplishment. Committing oneself to stay clean and sober, no matter what, is a considerable feat. Still, it’s common for men and women to leave treatment and think they can take a break from doing the work. It’s vital that you do not find yourself in such a mindset because there are no vacations from recovery.

Addiction is a disease that never rests; it is always attempting to reassert control over your life. Naturally, you do not want to find yourself back where you were before treatment. If that is indeed the case, then you will always make time for your recovery.

Once back in the real world, it would help if you remembered that the safety net you had while in treatment is no longer under you. With that in mind, you must rely on a mutual support group like Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous to protect your program.

Time is of the essence in the first days following discharge. You worked hard in treatment, and you must keep it up, or old behaviors and old ways of thinking will return. One has to get in the practice of attending meetings every day of the week; 90 meetings in 90 days is an excellent commitment after treatment.

Once you are in the habit of making 12 Step recovery the primary focus of each day, everything else will fall into place. You may have desires to dive back into school or your career immediately after treatment, which is OK. Provided, however, that you always make addiction recovery your number one priority. You put sobriety first to make it last; without it, you will inevitably encounter problems at work or school and risk losing your progress.

Being Ready for Anything is Essential

Treatment centers teach individuals how to cope with stress and how to spot risky situations. Surely, you learned about the common pitfalls that people face in early recovery. People, places, and things from your past should be avoided to vigilance.

Finding long-term recovery means adopting a new way of living that includes being responsible and accountable to your program and others in your support network. Life is unpredictable, which is why having trusted peers is so crucial. You never know when you’ll have to reach out for help.

A failure to prioritize attending meetings and fostering a deep-bench of support after treatment could spell disaster should you encounter an obstacle. If you don’t make time for your recovery, then you can rest assured that your disease will find time for you. Not making recovery a priority is like playing with fire, and you have no way of knowing how bad the burn will be should you relapse.

It’s easier to see the importance of finding time for your addiction recovery if you always remember life before treatment. Don’t lose sight of the depths of despair that addiction brought you to or where you would like to see yourself in the future.

You made the courageous decision to seek assistance for an alcohol or substance use disorder. Now, you have the power to build a healthy life of recovery upon the foundation laid in treatment. You did not get sober alone, so you can’t expect to maintain your sobriety without continued effort and support.

Addiction Recovery for Adult Males

At PACE Recovery Center, we help men break the cycle of addiction and adopt new principles and traditions. Our clients learn what needs to be done following discharge to keep the gains they made and protect their progress.

We offer an Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP), extended residential treatment, and transitional living for men who desire to lead a positive life free from drugs and alcohol. Please contact us today to learn about the PACE difference.

Addiction Recovery: Clean and Sober Celebrities Inspire Hope

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Celebrities who struggle with mental health and substance use disorders experience many of the same problems as average citizens. However, unlike average Americans, moviestars’ and musicians’ addictions make the headlines. A lack of anonymity can lead to shame and disgrace that can hinder one’s ability to find addiction recovery.

Famous individuals who battle addictive disorders become controversial figures regularly. Stars may do things while under the influence that can mar their reputations irrevocably at times. Addiction jeopardizes many careers or can end them entirely if steps to recover are not taken.

Sadly, many beloved pop icons have succumbed to their disease or taken their lives. We are all familiar with movie stars, television actors, comedians, and musicians whose lives ended in tragedy.

While society mourns the loss of beloved celebrities and remembers the joy such people brought to the lives of millions, it’s also vital to acknowledge those who battled addiction and found recovery. Some even go on to share their stories with the world and inspire others to seek addiction recovery.

Numerous people employed in Hollywood are working programs and championing causes to help end the misconceptions about addiction. Whenever someone who is looked up to by millions of people shares their story, it erodes the stigma of mental and behavioral health disorders.

Some of you may have read articles about Brad Pitt’s road to recovery recently. He has openly shared about the impact alcohol had on his life, what it cost him, and how addiction recovery saved his life. In interviews, he’s mentioned how other celebrities helped him in recovery, such as Bradley Cooper. Pitt and Cooper’s honesty is not rare; many other cultural icons are doing their part to inspire hope in others.

Addiction: A Family Disease that Doesn’t Discriminate

Some of our readers may know that the multiple-Grammy award-winning artist James Taylor had a long battle with addiction. Perhaps you know that he sought the help of addiction treatment centers on several occasions and experienced many relapses before finding long-term recovery.

TIME published an article on Taylor recently that brings to light many of the factors that impacted his life. When James was a teenager, he was admitted to a mental health facility, according to the article. He says that music saved his life, but he would go on to become addicted to drugs and alcohol as a nascent musician.

Addiction is a family disease. Like many people who are touched by alcohol and substance use disorders, Taylor’s family struggled with addiction too. His parents and all four siblings each battled with drugs and alcohol.

Taylor shared that he was addicted to opiates for about 18 years on an episode of Oprah’s Master Class in 2015. He finally found recovery and began working the 12 Steps in 1983 and has been sober ever since. That same year he released his 16th album, Before This World, which included songs that dealt with addiction recovery and salvation.

With more than 30 years of sobriety, James Taylor is proof that long-term recovery is possible even for the most severely addicted. Moreover, he does not shy away from carrying the message to those still in the grips of the disease.

The sooner you get over it, the sooner you get on with your life,” Taylor said. “The 12-step programs are the best way we’ve discovered, so far, for recovering from addiction.”

Finding sobriety has led other artists and actors to create works that shine a light on addiction and recovery. People are encouraged to seek help when celebrities courageously share and create music and films about the disease.

From Addiction Recovery to Relapse: The Way Back

As mentioned earlier, addiction can make a person into a controversial figure and take what’s most important from them, and such is the case of Oscar-winner Ben Affleck. The Argo director has been in the news lately a lot due to his divorce, apologizing for groping a talk show host in 2013, and his struggles with alcoholism.

Last year, he relapsed a few months after announcing he had achieved one year of sustained recovery, The New York Times reports. He acknowledges that alcohol use cost him his marriage to Jennifer Garner, the mother of their three children. While his recent relapse was a significant setback and source of shame, he has not given up on breaking the cycle of addiction.

It took me a long time to fundamentally, deeply, without a hint of doubt, admit to myself that I am an alcoholic,” Ben Affleck said. “The next drink will not be different.”

Addiction is a family disease for Ben Affleck; his father is an alcoholic just like James Taylor’s. He shares that his father sobered up when Ben was 19. His younger brother Casey Affleck has spoken openly about his battle with alcoholism and sobriety. The Afflecks’ aunt struggled with heroin addiction, and their grandmother and uncle both committed suicide.

Ben Affleck is back in recovery and is working. He stars in The Way Back, which opens in theaters on March 6, about a man in the grips of alcoholism. The main character’s life echo’s Affleck’s life in several ways.

In the film, Affleck plays Jack Cunningham, an alcoholic construction worker who becomes a high school basketball coach. Cunningham, like Affleck, lost his marriage to drinking, the article reports. He will eventually end up in addiction treatment.

California Addiction Treatment for Men

At PACE Recovery Center, we equip adult men with the tools to lead a healthy and positive life in addiction recovery. Our center utilizes evidence-based therapies to help men break the disease cycle.

Our Masters and Doctorate-level clinicians also specialize in the treatment of stand-alone and co-occurring mental illness. We invite you to contact us today to learn more about the benefits of gender-specific treatment and the PACE Recovery difference.

Addiction and Sadness Connection: Emotions and Addictive Behaviors

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Positive emotions are beneficial for people in recovery; whereas, negative emotions derail one’s program and can lead to relapse. At PACE, we fully subscribe to the power of positivity and its impact on lasting addiction recovery. While we understand that life can be difficult, and challenges can elicit negative feelings, each of us has the power to alter our perspective and move forward productively.

At the core of addictive behaviors are several negative sentiments such as guilt, shame, self-loathing, disgust, anger, sadness, and fear. Some addiction specialists argue that the latter state of being is the crux of addiction. Those who hope to break free from addiction must work tirelessly not to let negative emotions run their lives.

It’s hard to see the sunny side of life when you are in the grips of despair, but no matter how dark your reality appears, there is always hope. Life doesn’t have to be the way it is always, and we humans have an enormous capacity for change both internally and externally. Right now, millions of people around the globe are leading healthy and positive lives in recovery, which means that you can too.

The road to a more positive life is not without potholes, and everyone stumbles from time to time. Still, it’s not the falling that matters; it’s the getting back up and trudging forward and never losing sight of your goals.

Even people with years of sobriety have less than ideal days. A myriad of factors can jeopardize one’s serenity, such as a death in the family or loss of employment, for example. Bad days are normal, but wallowing in misfortune is not, nor is it healthy—especially for people in recovery.

On this blog, we like to discuss the power of positivity on a regular basis; we believe it’s helpful for those in early recovery. The first year of sobriety is a rollercoaster ride of emotions – some good and some bad – and it’s vital not to let the latter take over. It’s easier said than done, but with a support network by your side, you can overcome any obstacle and the accompanying negative emotions.

Sadness In Early Recovery

Learning how to cope with negative emotions is something that many people discover in treatment. It’s vital to have such skills because negative emotions will crop up without warning and must be addressed immediately. One of the more common emotions that people in early recovery contend with is sadness.

You can be sad for a number of reasons. Men and women in early recovery are often consumed by regret. When the fog of drugs and alcohol clears, many have a propensity to look back on their using tenure with sadness. Some will even mourn the loss of the drugs and alcohol, even though they understand that such substances were detrimental.

If you find yourself in a funk and are feeling down, then it’s vital to take action and talk to someone you trust immediately. Such emotions can spread through the mind like wildfire, and the smoke created will cloud your vision for the future.

Always remember that the past is behind you and that you only have the power to change what you do today. Dwelling on the past and breathing air into negative feelings can lead you down a destructive path. It turns out that sadness is an emotion that researchers associate with addictive behaviors.

Sadness and Addictive Substance Use

A new study that mainly focuses on the use of cigarettes could also shed light on all addictive behaviors. Researchers from Harvard University sought to determine which role emotions play in addictive behavior. The findings – appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences – indicate that sadness plays a significant part in triggering addictive behaviors.

The researchers examined four studies which all reinforce the finding that sadness leads to cravings more than any other negative emotion, according to the Harvard Kennedy School. The team believes that their results could help in designing more effective prevention campaigns.

The conventional wisdom in the field was that any type of negative feelings, whether it’s anger, disgust, stress, sadness, fear, or shame, would make individuals more likely to use an addictive drug,” said lead researcher Charles A. Dorison, a Harvard Kennedy School doctoral candidate. “Our work suggests that the reality is much more nuanced than the idea of ‘feel bad, smoke more.’ Specifically, we find that sadness appears to be an especially potent trigger of addictive substance use.”

Gender-Specific Addiction and Mental Health Treatment

Adult males are invited to reach out to PACE Recovery Center to learn more about our evidence-based therapies for the treatment of addiction and mental illness. We offer specialized clinical treatment tracks to address all components of addiction and mental health. If you are struggling with alcohol, drugs, or a mental health disorder, our team of highly trained professionals can help you achieve lasting recovery.

Recovery Re-Evaluation: Your Lifestyle Matters

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Re-evaluating your lifestyle from time to time is essential for making sure you remain on track in early recovery. It’s easy to slip back into old ways of thinking that you learned to rid yourself of in treatment. Before you know it, you can find yourself associating with people who are not beneficial to your continued progress.

In addiction treatment, everyone learns that achieving long-term recovery hinges on doing away with people, places, and things that run counter to your program. It can be hard to say goodbye to old friends and acquaintances, but cut off ties you must to prevent relapse. You learn that staying away from places that can trigger a relapse is also beneficial, as well as anything that can cause you to crave a drink or drug, i.e., no longer listening to a particular band.

Once out of treatment – whether you move on to sober living or returning home – you were instructed to get to a meeting and find a sponsor immediately. Mutual support groups like Alcoholics Anonymous is a great place to start; meetings are ideal locations for fostering healthy relationships and finding a person to walk you through the steps.

Over time one gets comfortable. Having an established routine and following the direction of others with more time makes you feel secure in your recovery. You also benefit from acquiring a deep bench of support comprised of peers who you can count on for assistance if you are struggling. Members of your deep bench also replace your old using buddies; they are the people who you call if you want to have a good time.

Is Your Lifestyle Congruent With Your Recovery?

Unfortunately, many people in early recovery forget how important it is to stick close to their support network both inside meetings and out. Some will feel the urge to re-establish contact with old friends because they feel like their program is strong. They may also start visiting places from their past because they think they can handle being around substances without being tempted to use.

Such behaviors are risky, and if one does not re-evaluate their changes in lifestyle, they can find themselves with a drink or drug in their hands. It’s not just risky people and places that can be the impetus for a relapse. Changing the meeting routine or spending less time with your support network can impact your ability to make progress. Feeling like you no longer need to check in with your sponsor regularly can also be a sign that recovery is losing its priority.

In treatment, you may have begun eating healthier and exercising helps nourish your mind and body. Perhaps you continued to eat right and exercise after discharge. If so, that is excellent, but it’s paramount to stay on track with healthy living. Deviating from your diet and workout routine is a change in lifestyle that could lead to issues down the road. Anything that you do that is not beneficial to your recovery can send you back into the cycle of addiction.

Periodically checking in with yourself to see if you are still leading a recovery-first lifestyle is crucial. Relapse is a process, not an event! Indeed, picking up a drink or drug again after a period of abstinence is an event, but the journey to relapse starts long before one decides to jeopardize all their hard work.

Is Your Recovery Still a Priority?

Have you started to drift away from your support network or stopped calling your sponsor? Are you still going to meetings or therapy sessions? Have you put your dietary and physical fitness needs on the back burner? Lastly, have you begun associating with people who are at odds with your recovery? If any of the above rings a bell, then we strongly advise you to re-evaluate your lifestyle changes and consider how paramount your recovery is in achieving your goals.

It’s much simpler to get back on track before a relapse than it is after. If recovery is still your number one priority, then please call your sponsor or a trusted peer and ask them for guidance. Such conversations may reveal to you that you’ve become complacent about your program and that perhaps you’ve forgotten the fragility of early recovery.

Please know that you have the ability to identify any program deviations and get back on track toward achieving your long-term goals. You have the power to “play the tape forward” and ask yourself, “What happens if I start using again?’ You will probably quickly realize that a return to active addiction is the last thing you want in life.

Southern California Addiction Treatment for Men

We invite you to contact PACE Recovery Center if you are an adult male who is currently in the grips of addiction. PACE also invites the family members with a male loved one who is battling with the symptoms of a behavioral or mental health disorder to reach out to us for help. We offer several programs that are specifically designed to cater to the unique needs of each client.

Our team is available 24 hours a day to answer any questions you have and help you get the ball of addiction or mental illness recovery in motion. 800-526-1851

Addiction Recovery: Protecting Your Progress

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The annual Monitoring the Future survey indicates that teen alcohol, tobacco, and illicit hard drug use is on the decline. However, the decade’s old survey found U.S. teens are vaping more marijuana and nicotine than a year ago. The latter is concerning, and these individuals may be putting themselves at risk of developing addiction down the road.

Some 14 percent of 12th graders reported vaping marijuana in the last month, which is almost double what was reported in the previous year. As we have pointed out in previous posts, marijuana use in one’s teenage years can lead to cannabis use disorder in the future. The condition can severely impact the course of young people’s lives.

While tobacco may be considered more benign regarding harming the mind, it can do severe damage to the body. Tobacco and nicotine use is associated with several forms of cancer and life-threatening disease. There is not enough research yet to determine the long-term health effects of e-cigarettes. Experts have diametrically opposing opinions on the dangers of electronic nicotine devices.

The recent findings have prompted lawmakers to raise the age of buying nicotine products from 18 to 21 years old. The move has bipartisan support among congressional lawmakers, and the White House seems to be behind raising the legal age limit too, The Washington Post reports. Public health advocates support the move, but they are not sure that it goes far enough.

While raising the age to 21 is a positive step, in this case, the tobacco industry supports it to avoid other policies — like removing flavors from e-cigarettes and menthol cigarettes that would have a much greater effect,” said Matthew Myers, president of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

Nicotine Addiction and Your Recovery

Preventing teenage vaping and nicotine initiation is vital to keeping young people off the path toward addiction. Experts stress that nicotine and THC, the primary psychoactive ingredient found in marijuana, can wreak havoc on developing minds. Moreover, both substances are addictive, and teenage use exponentially increases one’s chances of developing use disorders in the future.

We wrote last week about making resolutions for 2020; the subject was how to be a more positive person in recovery. We hope you had a chance to read the post as we believe that following some of our recommendations could enhance your recovery. Protecting your sobriety is of vital importance. Did you know that nicotine can increase the likelihood of relapse?

Research published last year found that people in recovery who use nicotine products are more likely to return to drug and alcohol use. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) reports that cigarette smoking might increase the likelihood of SUD relapse because:

  • Cigarette smoking often accompanies illicit drug use, and cigarettes may serve as a drug cue and relapse trigger.
  • Some studies have linked nicotine exposure to cravings for stimulants and opiates.

So, if you are working a program of addiction recovery and are still using nicotine products, then perhaps a realistic 2020 resolution can be smoking cessation. Working a program takes tremendous effort, and you can benefit from removing from your life anything that can jeopardize your hard-fought progress.

At PACE Recovery Center, we understand that giving up nicotine is challenging. However, there are many resources available to help you achieve the goal. Talk to your physician or call your state’s tobacco hotline for help quitting. 2020 could be the year that you free yourself from nicotine addiction and strengthen your recovery.

Gender-Specific Addiction Treatment

Please contact PACE Recovery Center if you are an adult male in the grips of alcohol or substance use disorder. We offer many programs that can help you get on the path to long-term recovery, and to lead a healthy and positive life. We provide several programs designed to meet the specific needs of each client.

At PACE, we also offer services for men who are battling mental illnesses like depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder. We invite you to phone us today to learn more about our evidence-based practices and begin the journey of lasting recovery. You will also be pleased to know that PACE works with and accepts most insurance carriers. 800-526-1851

Recovery Goal 2020: Being More Positive

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Christmas and Kwanzaa are now behind us, Hanukkah is drawing toward the end, and New Year’s Eve is quickly approaching. At PACE Recovery Center, we hope that everyone in recovery has managed to keep their program secure.

The holiday season is difficult for men and women in sobriety—no matter how much time you have clean and sober. Those who are able to avoid relapse during this emotional time of the year are the individuals who keep a positive attitude and always put their recovery first.

Placing your program before all else means prioritizing meetings and Step work, being of service, and steering clear of risky situations. Men and women in early recovery should stay away from people, places, and things that could trigger a desire to use. The first year is a fragile time, which is why it is vitally critical to stay close to your support network.

With New Year’s Eve on the horizon, we hope that you are making plans for bringing in 2020 safe and sober. Here is Southern California, parties litter the coastline on December 31st; you may find yourself tempted to attend one in your neighborhood. We strongly advise that you make inquiries at your home group about recovery-focused New Year’s Eve gatherings.

People in recovery are not sticks in the mud, and they thoroughly insist on having a good time. What’s more, members of the recovery community understand that one of the best ways to prevent relapse is to stick together. So, after you attend your meetings for the day, get yourself to a place where others in recovery will be celebrating the beginning of 2020.

A More Positive Year in Recovery

At PACE Recovery Center, we remind our clients that a positive attitude changes everything. While we understand that early recovery is daunting, one must do all they can to put their best foot forward.

It’s not always easy to maintain a sunny disposition when you have to face troubling aspects of your past. However, it’s possible to clear your mind of negative thoughts and replace them with things that make you happy.

Remember that the past is behind you; there is nothing that can be done to change what has already happened. If you spend too much time focusing on the negatives of yesterday, it will hinder your ability to make progress, both inside treatment and out.

With a new year brings the promise of achieving novel goals; one realistic and achievable resolution is being more positive. There is a myriad of methods for realizing the goal of being a more positive person. They include, but are not limited to:

  • Being of service to others.
  • Making daily gratitude lists.
  • Introducing a meditation routine into your days.
  • Getting outdoors as much as possible.
  • Being kind to yourself.

Putting Positivity Into Practice

In recovery, there is no shortage of opportunities for being of service to others. Showing up early and leaving meetings late will give you time to talk to newcomers. Showing care and compassion will make you feel better. Before and after meetings also allows you an opportunity to help set up and break down a meeting. You don’t need to have a service position to be useful to your homegroup.

Gratitude is essential to addiction recovery; being grateful for the helpful things and people in your life is invaluable. In 2020, make lists of what is right in your life as often as possible. It helps to see on paper all the people who support you on the path to recovery. When you remind yourself that you are not alone, it enables you to maintain a more positive disposition each day.

Meditation is a proven method of leading a more positive life. There are many resources online to help guide you in this area. Those who meditate feel more grounded throughout their day and are better able to shut out negative thoughts.

Being mindful for just a few minutes a day teaches us that everything changes, making it easier to have hope in dark moments,” explains Jo Eckler, PsyD. “This will also help strengthen your practice of observing—but not always giving into—the negative thoughts your brain likes to conjure.”

Spending more time outside, even for just short intervals, is exceptionally beneficial. Nature has a way of giving us perspective on things that are bothering us. If you are feeling stressed, then pause and walk outside; it will likely make you feel better.

No matter what is happening in your life, be kind to yourself. We all make mistakes but beating yourself up with negative self-talk will not help. Work the problem!

Recovery 2020

We invite adult men to contact PACE Recovery Center if you have an alcohol or substance use disorder. Our dedicated team of behavioral and mental health professionals can also assist men who have a co-occurring mental illness. At PACE, we offer programs for individuals who are not struggling with drugs and alcohol but are plagued by mental health disorders, such as depression.

Please reach out to us today to learn more about our services. We can help you bring in the New Year with healing and recovery and get on the path toward a more positive life.

Recovery and the American Opioid Epidemic

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At PACE Recovery Center, we are hopeful that you were able to make it through Thanksgiving without incident. As we have pointed out previously, the relapse rate tends to elevate during significant holidays. If your addiction recovery was compromised, we understand how you are feeling.

Hopefully, you have already discussed your relapse with your sponsor or a trusted peer. It’s difficult to admit that you slipped up, but it’s essential to get back on the road to recovery immediately.

The shame and guilt that accompanies relapses can be paralyzing; such feelings tend to prompt people to continue using even though they know where it leads. Please do not let relapse morph into an active cycle of addiction.

You are not alone; many people experience a relapse in early recovery. What’s salient is that you quickly identify as a newcomer, talk with your sponsor, or a trusted peer, in private about what happened.

A relapse is not the end of the world, and it can be used as a valuable learning experience. Choosing to go with the opposite route, keeping the matter to yourself, will restart the cycle of addiction. This path may result in you needing to return to an addiction treatment center for more intensive assistance.

We hope that you navigated Thanksgiving without incident, but if you didn’t, then you are at a critical juncture. You have to decide whether you are going to be honest, or let the disease re-exert control over your life. Naturally, we hope that you choose the former. If you do not, then please contact PACE Recovery Center to discuss your options. We have helped many men get back on the road toward lasting recovery following a relapse.

An Exposé On The American Opioid Crisis and Recovery

For the remainder of this week’s post, we would like to take the opportunity to share a timely exposé about the opioid epidemic. While progress has been made in recent years in reining in the scourge of prescription opioid abuse, millions of Americans continue to struggle.

One publication that has dedicated significant resources to shine a light on this deadly public health crisis is The New York Times (NYT). Over the last two decades, the newspaper has published scores of articles covering practically every angle. Everything from how opioids became ubiquitous in America to legislation aimed at tackling the problem has been covered in recent years.

A couple of days ago, NYT released an article titled: “The Class of 2000 ‘Could Have Been Anything.’” At first glance, the title may be nebulous in meaning and appear to have little to do with the opioid epidemic.

Dan Levin covers American youth for The Times’ National Desk. He recently took a close look at one high school class that graduated right as the prescription opioid epidemic began to take hold of communities across America. Now twenty years later, Levin found that many of Minford High School’s Class of 2000, in rural Minford, Scioto County, Ohio, continues to wrestle with opioid use disorder.

There is much to unpack in the article; the author focuses on a select number of students who came of age in town that leads Ohio with fatal drug overdoses, drug-related incarceration, and neonatal abstinence syndrome rates. The students share how they were introduced to opioids in high school, and about how addiction changed the course of their life.

In 2010, Scioto County led the state in the number of opioid prescriptions— enough opioids were prescribed to give 123 pills to each resident.

A Devastating Toll, but Signs of Hope

While several students would succumb to their opioid use disorder, there are others who are now on the road to recovery. Jonathan Whitt became addicted to prescription opioids when he was 16; by 28, he was using heroin intravenously, according to the article. Whitt said that he was incarcerated many times and went to rehab on numerous occasions before choosing a new path. Today, Whitt has four years clean and sober.

The consequences started happening in college. By this point I was physically dependent on OxyContin, but it was very easy to tell myself, ‘I don’t do crack, I don’t shoot up.’ That messed me up for a really long time.” — Jake Bradshaw, Milford Class of 2000

Jake Bradshaw has been in recovery since 2013, the article reports. He is the founder of the “Humans of Addiction” blog. Today, Mr. Bradshaw works in the addiction treatment industry.

There are many more individuals who are highlighted in the story, and we encourage you to read the article at length. The two Milford alum are examples that recovery is possible, even after years of misuse and addiction. It’s critical to remember that the opioid epidemic is still in full force. Efforts to curb this most severe public health crisis are essential.

Since the Milford students graduated in 2000, some 275 people have died of an overdose in rural Scioto County, Ohio. Moreover, in excess of 400,000 Americans have died from opioid overdoses across the country since the turn of the century.

Addiction Treatment for Men

Addiction recovery is possible for any man who desires it, but the first step is reaching out for support. Please contact PACE Recovery Center if you are one of the millions whose life has become unmanageable due to opioid use disorder. Our team utilizes evidence-based therapies to give men the tools for leading a productive, positive life in recovery.

Recovery During Thanksgiving: Maintaining Your Sobriety

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You don’t need to have alcohol for a good Thanksgiving. If you are in addiction recovery, alcohol will not only complicate your day, but it will derail your program. With the significant holiday quickly approaching, there are many things you can do to prepare yourself for keeping your sobriety intact and have an excellent time as well.

Men in the first 365 days of recovery are entering the holiday season for the first time. Such people may not fully know what to expect, but it’s safe to say that many have some concerns. Some will be around family members this Thursday, which means there may be questions about why they are not drinking.

While your recovery is nobody’s business but your own, you may want to think about having something to say for any off-putting questions. Your closest family members may know you are working a program, but others may not. As such, the latter may encourage you to drink or inquire as to why you are teetotaling your way through the celebration.

It is reasonable if you do not feel comfortable divulging information about the path you are on. Having a script in the back of your mind can save you from having to answer uncomfortable questions. It may feel as though you’re dishonest when, in fact, you are merely guarding your personal health information.

You can say that you are taking a medication that doesn’t mix with alcohol. It’s also okay to say that you are working on being healthier and that you are more committed to exercise and diet than drinking. There is a myriad of acceptable responses to explain away your alcohol intake. Talk to your sponsor to discover how they handle unsolicited questions about sobriety.

Recovery Comes First Every Day

Thanksgiving shouldn’t be treated differently than any other day of the year. Those who work a program and are committed to a new path understand that recovery must always be priority number one. As the saying goes, ‘put your sobriety first to make it last.’

It’s challenging to prioritize recovery day in and day out, 365 days a year. However, the task can be even more arduous during the holiday seasons. Thanksgiving and Christmas can be a time of added stress and unwanted emotions. Not everyone looks forward to the holidays, even if they are time for togetherness.

Many people in early recovery associate the holidays with unpleasurable memories. What’s more, not everyone in early recovery has their family back in their lives. The thought of not being welcome at the family table can be hard to stomach. Fortunately, you have your support network to spend time with this coming Thursday.

Whenever a holiday comes around, you can rest assured that a member of your support group (homegroup) will be hosting a get-together. If you have not heard anything yet, ask your sponsor or share at your next meeting that you are wondering how others are planning for Thanksgiving. Your support network will be able to guide you on safe and sober ways to occupy your time.

On Thursday, please resist the temptation to isolate and ensure that you make it to at least one meeting. It never hurts to go to multiple meetings during a holiday, either. Do your best to start your day how you would any other day of the year, i.e., prayer/meditation, exercise, a healthy breakfast, reading, or step work. Know what meetings you plan to attend ahead of time!

Protect Your Sobriety

While it’s best to spend your holidays in sobriety with other sober people, you may feel obligated to make an appearance at Thanksgiving dinner. People who plan to attend an event that involves alcohol should see if that can bring a friend for support, preferably someone else in the program. If that is not possible, and you still plan to attend, then keep your phone charged so that you can always reach out for help.

It’s a helpful practice to show up a little late and leave early from holiday gatherings. Doing so can spare you from being cornered into answering unwanted questions and prevent you from being around drunk people.

You do not owe anyone an explanation for why you are leaving early. It also helps if you can be responsible for your transportation. Those who do not drive can benefit from making preparations to be dropped off and picked up by a friend in the program; this practice is an extra level of accountability.

Once you leave a holiday event, get yourself to meeting to decompress. There may be things that you saw, heard, or felt that need to be processed. At the very least, make plans with friends from your support network to close out the day.

A Safe and Sober Thanksgiving

The Gentlemen of PACE Recovery Center would like to wish everyone a safe and sober Thanksgiving. Never hesitate to reach out for support; always call before your fall. If you experience challenges, such a relapse, get to a meeting ASAP to recommit yourself to the program.

We invite men to contact PACE to discuss your options if you may feel like you need more significant assistance. We are available at any time to answer your questions and help you get back on the road to lasting recovery.

Recovery During Independence Day: Having a Plan

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The Fourth of July is less than 24 hours away, which means that people in addiction recovery are making plans. It’s vital to have a schedule during major holidays, especially the ones synonymous with heavy alcohol consumption. Leaving things up to chance is never a sound practice in sobriety.

Like any holiday, it’s imperative to fill up the day with recovery-centered activities. The goal is to prevent finding oneself in any situation that could compromise progress. Accruing any length of clean and sober time is an enormous undertaking that requires steadfast dedication and vigilance. Nobody wants to jeopardize their hard work, which is why showing deference to the dangers of holidays is paramount.

Men and women who are in the first year of sobriety are often tempted to test the strength of their program. Some are convinced that they can attend holiday functions, barbeques, and parties just like everyone else. While it is possible to go to an Independence Day party without picking up a drink, in most early recovery cases, it’s not worth the risk.

The Fourth is not Christmas; there aren’t the same familial expectations to attend functions. With that in mind, people in recovery are free to forge a safe path from one side of the holiday to the other. Structuring one’s day similar to any other day is beneficial: prayer or meditation, attending home groups, being of service and engaging with one’s peers. Those who put their program first make it last!

Occupying Your Time on the Fourth

Since most businesses are closed on the Fourth of July, many people don’t have to work. It is not uncommon to attend several recovery meetings during holidays, it’s even advised in fact. Meetings are held around the clock to ensure everyone in sobriety has a safe harbor to wait out the turbulent seas that holidays bring. Moreover, recovery communities organize Independence Day events that are a fun time.

When given the option to attend an event that involves alcohol use or one whose guests are in recovery, deciding which is healthier is not challenging. People in early recovery might think that it’s boring to attend a program-related holiday gathering, but please do not knock it until you try it.

Those committed to abstaining from drugs and alcohol are not sticks in the mud, and they know how to have a good time. Another benefit of attending an event hosted by people in the program is that one has the opportunity to bond with their peers outside the rooms. Meeting new men and women out in the world could lead to lasting friendships.

If you haven’t taken the opportunity to make a plan for the holiday, please take action. Another holiday pitfall is isolation; spending too much time alone can be detrimental. Reach out to some of your peers today to find out what they are planning for tomorrow. They may know of something exciting happening that you will want to attend.

Independence from Addiction, Finding Recovery

Tomorrow, we acknowledge our nation’s rich history. On July 4, 1776, the Continental Congress declared independence. The Gentlemen of PACE Recovery Center hope that everyone working a program has a safe and sober Independence Day.

We also understand that millions of American men are in the grips of the disease of addiction and would like to find freedom. We can help adult males break the cycle and transform their lives through working a program of recovery. Please contact us today to take the first steps toward living independently from drugs and alcohol.

Young men who are struggling with non-substance-related mental illness, such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder, are encouraged to reach out to us as well.

The PACE Mental Health Program can treat and help you navigate mood disorders and life obstacles arising during college and young adulthood. Click the link to learn more about our Huntington Beach Mental Health Program.

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